Main
Date: 08 Feb 2009 12:34:29
From: Gianluca Cisana
Subject: New address for JBremboCE
I've put the applet JBremboCE on a new website because the old one is
often slow or off-line. The new web address is:

http://bremboce.altervista.org

Bye, Gianluca




 
Date: 11 Feb 2009 11:37:53
From: Taylor Kingston
Subject: Re: New address for JBremboCE
On Feb 8, 6:34=A0am, Gianluca Cisana <g...@nospam.com > wrote:
> I've put the applet JBremboCE on a new website because the old one is
> often slow or off-line. The new web address is:
>
> http://bremboce.altervista.org
>
> Bye, Gianluca

Gianluca, in case you're interested in any games, observations and/
or recommendations, here are a few:

I can't stress enough that it needs at least a simple opening book,
one with some variety to it. By trial and error I've found some very
unsound lines it will always play, invariably leading to lost
positions. Some examples (applet is Black in each case):

1. d4 c5 2. d5 Qa5+ 3. Bd2 Qb6 4. Nc3 Qxb2?? 5. Rb1 Qa3 6. Nb5 Qxa2 7.
Nc7+ Kd8 8. Nxa8 Na6 9. Ra1 Qb2 10. Rxa6 bxa6 11. Ba5+ Ke8 12. Nc7+
Kd8 13. Nxa6+ Ke8 14. Nc7+ Kd8 15. Nb5+ Ke8 and White has an easily
won game.

1. d4 c5 2. e4 cxd4 3. c3 Transposing to the Smith-Morra Gambit of the
Siclian, a tricky line where an unbooked opponent can easily get into
trouble. 3...dxc3 4. Nxc3 Nc6 5. Nf3 d6 6. Bc4 f5?? Dreadfully
weakening to the kingside, and further opening up the game when Black
is badly behind in development. White has a great advantage after
either 7.Ng5, 7.exf5, 7.0-0, or 7.Qb3.

1. e4 d5 2. e5 Nc6?! =97 2...c5 seems more logical, to counteract
White's next move. Black ends up getting an inferior form of Nimzovich
Defense. 3. d4 f6 4. f4 Be6?! =97 Very strange. The program deploys in a
very awkward manner over the next several moves. 5. Nf3 Nh6 6. Be3 Qd7
7. Nbd2 Nf5 8. Bf2 O-O-O =97 It seems too early to commit to queenside
castling. White is in a better position to open lines on that wing
than Black is on the kingside. 9. c3 g6 10. g4 Nh6 11. h3 Nf7 =97
Black's postion is becoming seriously cramped. 12. b4 Bh6 13. Nb3 =97
Threatening 14.Nc5+-. If Black tries to prevent this by 13... b6 14.
Ba6+ Kb8 15. b5 wins the Nc6 and perhaps more. 13...Nb8 =97 But this is
even worse. 14. Nc5 Qc6 15. b5 Qb6 16. a4 a5 17. bxa6 bxa6 18. Rb1 Qc6
19. Qb3 and massive material loss is imminent. The program plays
19...Qxc5 at this point, tantamount to resigning.

Besides early pawn-grabbing queen sorties, ill-advised
counterthrusts, and awkward play in closed positions, it's also fond
of unnecessary, counter-productive checks. For example, against a
Colle System it plays 1.Nf3 e6 2.d4 Nf6 3.e3 Bb4+?! =97 A waste of time,
allowing White to gain a tempo with a move he'd play anyway in this
opening. 4.c3 Bd6? =97 Why put the bishop here? 5.Bd3 0-0 6.e4 Be7 and
due to the moves Black has wasted with the bishop, White already has a
definite advantage.

I don't want to give a misleading impression here. The program has
beaten me a number of times, when I was too careless or inept to think
at least 6-ply deep, as it always does. But once these flawed lines
are discovered, one can just repeat them to beat the program over and
over.



  
Date: 13 Feb 2009 10:12:36
From: Taylor Kingston
Subject: Re: New address for JBremboCE

I hope I'm not overdoing this, Gianluca, but here's one more opening
trap that I've found it falls into:

1.g3 e5 2.c4 Nf6 3.Bg2 Bc5 4.Nc3 Nc6 =97 We've transposed into a Reverse
Sicilian. Black uses a naive sort of deployment I've seen
inexperienced players use often. =97 5.e3 0-0 6.Nge2 d6 7.0-0 Be6?? =97
This loses a piece. =97 8.d4 exd4 9.exd4 Nxd4 =97 If the Bc5 retreats,
then 10.d5. =97 10.Nxd4 Bxc4 11.Re1, and the two pawns are not enough
compensation for the lost piece.

On Feb 13, 10:13=A0am, Taylor Kingston <tkings...@chittenden.com > wrote:
> =A0 The applet likes to go hunting for knight pawns on either wing. I've
> already shown the refutation when it goes after the b-pawn. Here's a
> game where it goes after the g-pawn, with equally dire consequences:
>
> Kingston-JBremboCE, 2/13/2009:
>
> 1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Qxd5 3. Nc3 Qe6+ 4. Be2
>
> =A0 Checking ChessBase, I was interested to find out that this very line
> was played in a game between Kasparov and talk-show host David
> Letterman in 1989.
>
> 4...Qg6
>
> =A0 Letterman played 4...Nc6 and lost quickly: 1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Qxd5 3.
> Nc3 Qe6+ 4. Be2 Nc6 5. d4 Qg6 6. Nf3 Qxg2 7. Rg1 Qh3 8. d5 Na5 9. Nb5
> Qd7 10. Bf4 Nf6 11. Nxc7+ Kd8 12. Ne5 Qxc7 13. Nxf7+ Ke8 14.Bxc7 Kxf7
> 15. Bxa5 Bf5 16. Qd4 Bxc2 17. Rc1 Be4 18. Rc7 Rd8 19. d6 b6 20. Bc3
> Bd5 21. Qe5 Be6 22. Qxf6+ gxf6 23. Bh5# 1-0.
> =A0 The text move forestalls an immediate assault on c7, but the game
> still develops along similar lines.
>
> 5. Nf3!
>
> =A0 As in the line 1.d4 c5 2.d5 Qa5+ 3.Bd2 Qb6, the knight pawn is
> disposable, White getting great development in compensation.
>
> 5...Qxg2 6. Rg1 Qh3 7. d4 Nf6 8. Bf4 c6 9. Qd2 Bg4
>
> =A0 Up to this point the game had matched Alsina Leal - Daniel, World
> Youth Stars 2003. That game continued =A09...Na6 10. a3 Qd7 11. Ne5 Qd8
> 12. Bxa6 bxa6 13. Nxc6 Qb6 14. Ne5 Bf5 15. Nc4 Qe6+ 16. Ne3 Ne4 17.
> Nxe4 Bxe4 18. d5 Qb6 19. O-O-O Rc8 20. Qd4 Bf3 21. Rd3 Be2 22. Rd2
> Qxd4 23. Rxd4 g6 24. Rb4 Bg7 25. Rb7 Bd4 26. Re1 Bf3 27. c3 e6 28. Kd2
> Bb6 29. c4 O-O 30. b4 exd5 31. Nxd5 Rxc4 32. Nxb6 axb6 0-1, one of the
> few times Black won with this opening in the CB database.
>
> 10. Ng5 Qh5 11. Rxg4
>
> Also good is 11. Bxg4 Nxg4 12. Bxb8 Rxb8 13. Qf4, forking the Rb8 and
> Ng4.
>
> 11... Nxg4 12. O-O-O
>
> =A0 No need to hurry, the pinned Ng4 isn't going anywhere for now.
>
> 12...f6 13. Ne6 Kf7 14. Nc7
>
> =A0 The knight gets to c7 after all. White now has several ways to win.
>
> 14...e5 15. dxe5 fxe5 16. Bc4+
>
> =A0 Abandoning the pin of the knight, because now White can win the
> queen.
>
> 16...Kg6 17. Qd3+ Qf5 18. Bf7+ Kf6 19. Ne8+ Kxf7 20. Qxf5+ Kxe8 21.
> Qe6+ Be7 22. Ne4 Kf8 23.Rd8+ Bxd8 24.Nd6 exf4 25.Qf7#. Notice how in
> the final position Black still has three pieces that never moved. The
> wages of pawn-grabbing is stunted development, which is often fatal.
>
> On Feb 11, 5:54=A0pm, Taylor Kingston <tkings...@chittenden.com> wrote:
>
>
>
> > =A0 Here's another game where the applet's defeat is caused by poor
> > opening play:
>
> > 1. Nf3 e6 2. e4 Bc5?! =97 It should continue into a French Defense with
> > 2...d5. The text just lets White dominate the center with gain of
> > time. 3. d4 Bb4+ =97 Another useless check. 4. c3 Be7 5.Bd3 Nf6 6. c4 O=
-
> > O 7. Nc3 Bb4? =97 The third time this bishop has moved, and now it
> > really costs. 8. e5! Ne8? =97 The lesser evil was 8...Ng4, though after
> > 9.h3 Nh6 10.Bxh6 gxh6 11.Qc1 Black is still in big trouble. But now he
> > falls prey to the oldest sac in the book: 9. Bxh7+! Kxh7 10. Ng5+ Kg8
> > =97 Or 10...Kg6 11.h4 and 12.h5+ winning. 11. Qh5 Qxg5 =97 Forced. 12.
> > Qxg5 Nc6 13. Be3 Na5 14. c5 b6 15. O-O Nc4 16. Ne4 Bb7 17. Nf6+! Nxf6
> > 18. exf6 g6 19. Qh6 Nxb2 20. Qg7# 1-0
>
> > On Feb 11, 2:37=A0pm, Taylor Kingston <tkings...@chittenden.com> wrote:
>
> > > On Feb 8, 6:34=A0am, Gianluca Cisana <g...@nospam.com> wrote:
>
> > > > I've put the applet JBremboCE on a new website because the old one =
is
> > > > often slow or off-line. The new web address is:
>
> > > >http://bremboce.altervista.org
>
> > > > Bye, Gianluca
>
> > > =A0 Gianluca, in case you're interested in any games, observations an=
d/
> > > or recommendations, here are a few:
>
> > > =A0 I can't stress enough that it needs at least a simple opening boo=
k,
> > > one with some variety to it. By trial and error I've found some very
> > > unsound lines it will always play, invariably leading to lost
> > > positions. Some examples (applet is Black in each case):
>
> > > 1. d4 c5 2. d5 Qa5+ 3. Bd2 Qb6 4. Nc3 Qxb2?? 5. Rb1 Qa3 6. Nb5 Qxa2 7=
.
> > > Nc7+ Kd8 8. Nxa8 Na6 9. Ra1 Qb2 10. Rxa6 bxa6 11. Ba5+ Ke8 12. Nc7+
> > > Kd8 13. Nxa6+ Ke8 14. Nc7+ Kd8 15. Nb5+ Ke8 and White has an easily
> > > won game.
>
> > > 1. d4 c5 2. e4 cxd4 3. c3 Transposing to the Smith-Morra Gambit of th=
e
> > > Siclian, a tricky line where an unbooked opponent can easily get into
> > > trouble. 3...dxc3 4. Nxc3 Nc6 5. Nf3 d6 6. Bc4 f5?? Dreadfully
> > > weakening to the kingside, and further opening up the game when Black
> > > is badly behind in development. White has a great advantage after
> > > either 7.Ng5, 7.exf5, 7.0-0, or 7.Qb3.
>
> > > 1. e4 d5 2. e5 Nc6?! =97 2...c5 seems more logical, to counteract
> > > White's next move. Black ends up getting an inferior form of Nimzovic=
h
> > > Defense. 3. d4 f6 4. f4 Be6?! =97 Very strange. The program deploys i=
n a
> > > very awkward manner over the next several moves. 5. Nf3 Nh6 6. Be3 Qd=
7
> > > 7. Nbd2 Nf5 8. Bf2 O-O-O =97 It seems too early to commit to queensid=
e
> > > castling. White is in a better position to open lines on that wing
> > > than Black is on the kingside. 9. c3 g6 10. g4 Nh6 11. h3 Nf7 =97
> > > Black's postion is becoming seriously cramped. 12. b4 Bh6 13. Nb3 =A0=
=97
> > > Threatening 14.Nc5+-. If Black tries to prevent this by 13... b6 14.
> > > Ba6+ Kb8 15. b5 wins the Nc6 and perhaps more. 13...Nb8 =97 But this =
is
> > > even worse. 14. Nc5 Qc6 15. b5 Qb6 16. a4 a5 17. bxa6 bxa6 18. Rb1 Qc=
6
> > > 19. Qb3 and massive material loss is imminent. The program plays
> > > 19...Qxc5 at this point, tantamount to resigning.
>
> > > =A0 Besides early pawn-grabbing queen sorties, ill-advised
> > > counterthrusts, and awkward play in closed positions, it's also fond
> > > of unnecessary, counter-productive checks. For example, against a
> > > Colle System it plays 1.Nf3 e6 2.d4 Nf6 3.e3 Bb4+?! =97 A waste of ti=
me,
> > > allowing White to gain a tempo with a move he'd play anyway in this
> > > opening. 4.c3 Bd6? =97 Why put the bishop here? 5.Bd3 0-0 6.e4 Be7 an=
d
> > > due to the moves Black has wasted with the bishop, White already has =
a
> > > definite advantage.
>
> > > =A0 I don't want to give a misleading impression here. The program ha=
s
> > > beaten me a number of times, when I was too careless or inept to thin=
k
> > > at least 6-ply deep, as it always does. But once these flawed lines
> > > are discovered, one can just repeat them to beat the program over and
> > > over.


   
Date: 14 Feb 2009 00:59:54
From: Gianluca Cisana
Subject: Re: New address for JBremboCE
Taylor Kingston ha scritto:
> I hope I'm not overdoing this, Gianluca, but here's one more opening
> trap that I've found it falls into:
>

Hello Taylor,

I'm archiving all your analysis in order to use them in the next future
for improving the evaluation function.
By now I've added a simple opening book!

Gianluca

http://bremboce.altervista.org


  
Date: 13 Feb 2009 07:13:07
From: Taylor Kingston
Subject: Re: New address for JBremboCE

The applet likes to go hunting for knight pawns on either wing. I've
already shown the refutation when it goes after the b-pawn. Here's a
game where it goes after the g-pawn, with equally dire consequences:

Kingston-JBremboCE, 2/13/2009:

1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Qxd5 3. Nc3 Qe6+ 4. Be2

Checking ChessBase, I was interested to find out that this very line
was played in a game between Kasparov and talk-show host David
Letterman in 1989.

4...Qg6

Letterman played 4...Nc6 and lost quickly: 1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Qxd5 3.
Nc3 Qe6+ 4. Be2 Nc6 5. d4 Qg6 6. Nf3 Qxg2 7. Rg1 Qh3 8. d5 Na5 9. Nb5
Qd7 10. Bf4 Nf6 11. Nxc7+ Kd8 12. Ne5 Qxc7 13. Nxf7+ Ke8 14.Bxc7 Kxf7
15. Bxa5 Bf5 16. Qd4 Bxc2 17. Rc1 Be4 18. Rc7 Rd8 19. d6 b6 20. Bc3
Bd5 21. Qe5 Be6 22. Qxf6+ gxf6 23. Bh5# 1-0.
The text move forestalls an immediate assault on c7, but the game
still develops along similar lines.

5. Nf3!

As in the line 1.d4 c5 2.d5 Qa5+ 3.Bd2 Qb6, the knight pawn is
disposable, White getting great development in compensation.

5...Qxg2 6. Rg1 Qh3 7. d4 Nf6 8. Bf4 c6 9. Qd2 Bg4

Up to this point the game had matched Alsina Leal - Daniel, World
Youth Stars 2003. That game continued 9...Na6 10. a3 Qd7 11. Ne5 Qd8
12. Bxa6 bxa6 13. Nxc6 Qb6 14. Ne5 Bf5 15. Nc4 Qe6+ 16. Ne3 Ne4 17.
Nxe4 Bxe4 18. d5 Qb6 19. O-O-O Rc8 20. Qd4 Bf3 21. Rd3 Be2 22. Rd2
Qxd4 23. Rxd4 g6 24. Rb4 Bg7 25. Rb7 Bd4 26. Re1 Bf3 27. c3 e6 28. Kd2
Bb6 29. c4 O-O 30. b4 exd5 31. Nxd5 Rxc4 32. Nxb6 axb6 0-1, one of the
few times Black won with this opening in the CB database.

10. Ng5 Qh5 11. Rxg4

Also good is 11. Bxg4 Nxg4 12. Bxb8 Rxb8 13. Qf4, forking the Rb8 and
Ng4.

11... Nxg4 12. O-O-O

No need to hurry, the pinned Ng4 isn't going anywhere for now.

12...f6 13. Ne6 Kf7 14. Nc7

The knight gets to c7 after all. White now has several ways to win.

14...e5 15. dxe5 fxe5 16. Bc4+

Abandoning the pin of the knight, because now White can win the
queen.

16...Kg6 17. Qd3+ Qf5 18. Bf7+ Kf6 19. Ne8+ Kxf7 20. Qxf5+ Kxe8 21.
Qe6+ Be7 22. Ne4 Kf8 23.Rd8+ Bxd8 24.Nd6 exf4 25.Qf7#. Notice how in
the final position Black still has three pieces that never moved. The
wages of pawn-grabbing is stunted development, which is often fatal.

On Feb 11, 5:54=A0pm, Taylor Kingston <tkings...@chittenden.com > wrote:
> =A0 Here's another game where the applet's defeat is caused by poor
> opening play:
>
> 1. Nf3 e6 2. e4 Bc5?! =97 It should continue into a French Defense with
> 2...d5. The text just lets White dominate the center with gain of
> time. 3. d4 Bb4+ =97 Another useless check. 4. c3 Be7 5.Bd3 Nf6 6. c4 O-
> O 7. Nc3 Bb4? =97 The third time this bishop has moved, and now it
> really costs. 8. e5! Ne8? =97 The lesser evil was 8...Ng4, though after
> 9.h3 Nh6 10.Bxh6 gxh6 11.Qc1 Black is still in big trouble. But now he
> falls prey to the oldest sac in the book: 9. Bxh7+! Kxh7 10. Ng5+ Kg8
> =97 Or 10...Kg6 11.h4 and 12.h5+ winning. 11. Qh5 Qxg5 =97 Forced. 12.
> Qxg5 Nc6 13. Be3 Na5 14. c5 b6 15. O-O Nc4 16. Ne4 Bb7 17. Nf6+! Nxf6
> 18. exf6 g6 19. Qh6 Nxb2 20. Qg7# 1-0
>
> On Feb 11, 2:37=A0pm, Taylor Kingston <tkings...@chittenden.com> wrote:
>
>
>
> > On Feb 8, 6:34=A0am, Gianluca Cisana <g...@nospam.com> wrote:
>
> > > I've put the applet JBremboCE on a new website because the old one is
> > > often slow or off-line. The new web address is:
>
> > >http://bremboce.altervista.org
>
> > > Bye, Gianluca
>
> > =A0 Gianluca, in case you're interested in any games, observations and/
> > or recommendations, here are a few:
>
> > =A0 I can't stress enough that it needs at least a simple opening book,
> > one with some variety to it. By trial and error I've found some very
> > unsound lines it will always play, invariably leading to lost
> > positions. Some examples (applet is Black in each case):
>
> > 1. d4 c5 2. d5 Qa5+ 3. Bd2 Qb6 4. Nc3 Qxb2?? 5. Rb1 Qa3 6. Nb5 Qxa2 7.
> > Nc7+ Kd8 8. Nxa8 Na6 9. Ra1 Qb2 10. Rxa6 bxa6 11. Ba5+ Ke8 12. Nc7+
> > Kd8 13. Nxa6+ Ke8 14. Nc7+ Kd8 15. Nb5+ Ke8 and White has an easily
> > won game.
>
> > 1. d4 c5 2. e4 cxd4 3. c3 Transposing to the Smith-Morra Gambit of the
> > Siclian, a tricky line where an unbooked opponent can easily get into
> > trouble. 3...dxc3 4. Nxc3 Nc6 5. Nf3 d6 6. Bc4 f5?? Dreadfully
> > weakening to the kingside, and further opening up the game when Black
> > is badly behind in development. White has a great advantage after
> > either 7.Ng5, 7.exf5, 7.0-0, or 7.Qb3.
>
> > 1. e4 d5 2. e5 Nc6?! =97 2...c5 seems more logical, to counteract
> > White's next move. Black ends up getting an inferior form of Nimzovich
> > Defense. 3. d4 f6 4. f4 Be6?! =97 Very strange. The program deploys in =
a
> > very awkward manner over the next several moves. 5. Nf3 Nh6 6. Be3 Qd7
> > 7. Nbd2 Nf5 8. Bf2 O-O-O =97 It seems too early to commit to queenside
> > castling. White is in a better position to open lines on that wing
> > than Black is on the kingside. 9. c3 g6 10. g4 Nh6 11. h3 Nf7 =97
> > Black's postion is becoming seriously cramped. 12. b4 Bh6 13. Nb3 =A0=
=97
> > Threatening 14.Nc5+-. If Black tries to prevent this by 13... b6 14.
> > Ba6+ Kb8 15. b5 wins the Nc6 and perhaps more. 13...Nb8 =97 But this is
> > even worse. 14. Nc5 Qc6 15. b5 Qb6 16. a4 a5 17. bxa6 bxa6 18. Rb1 Qc6
> > 19. Qb3 and massive material loss is imminent. The program plays
> > 19...Qxc5 at this point, tantamount to resigning.
>
> > =A0 Besides early pawn-grabbing queen sorties, ill-advised
> > counterthrusts, and awkward play in closed positions, it's also fond
> > of unnecessary, counter-productive checks. For example, against a
> > Colle System it plays 1.Nf3 e6 2.d4 Nf6 3.e3 Bb4+?! =97 A waste of time=
,
> > allowing White to gain a tempo with a move he'd play anyway in this
> > opening. 4.c3 Bd6? =97 Why put the bishop here? 5.Bd3 0-0 6.e4 Be7 and
> > due to the moves Black has wasted with the bishop, White already has a
> > definite advantage.
>
> > =A0 I don't want to give a misleading impression here. The program has
> > beaten me a number of times, when I was too careless or inept to think
> > at least 6-ply deep, as it always does. But once these flawed lines
> > are discovered, one can just repeat them to beat the program over and
> > over.- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -



  
Date: 11 Feb 2009 14:54:32
From: Taylor Kingston
Subject: Re: New address for JBremboCE

Here's another game where the applet's defeat is caused by poor
opening play:

1. Nf3 e6 2. e4 Bc5?! =97 It should continue into a French Defense with
2...d5. The text just lets White dominate the center with gain of
time. 3. d4 Bb4+ =97 Another useless check. 4. c3 Be7 5.Bd3 Nf6 6. c4 O-
O 7. Nc3 Bb4? =97 The third time this bishop has moved, and now it
really costs. 8. e5! Ne8? =97 The lesser evil was 8...Ng4, though after
9.h3 Nh6 10.Bxh6 gxh6 11.Qc1 Black is still in big trouble. But now he
falls prey to the oldest sac in the book: 9. Bxh7+! Kxh7 10. Ng5+ Kg8
=97 Or 10...Kg6 11.h4 and 12.h5+ winning. 11. Qh5 Qxg5 =97 Forced. 12.
Qxg5 Nc6 13. Be3 Na5 14. c5 b6 15. O-O Nc4 16. Ne4 Bb7 17. Nf6+! Nxf6
18. exf6 g6 19. Qh6 Nxb2 20. Qg7# 1-0



On Feb 11, 2:37=A0pm, Taylor Kingston <tkings...@chittenden.com > wrote:
> On Feb 8, 6:34=A0am, Gianluca Cisana <g...@nospam.com> wrote:
>
> > I've put the applet JBremboCE on a new website because the old one is
> > often slow or off-line. The new web address is:
>
> >http://bremboce.altervista.org
>
> > Bye, Gianluca
>
> =A0 Gianluca, in case you're interested in any games, observations and/
> or recommendations, here are a few:
>
> =A0 I can't stress enough that it needs at least a simple opening book,
> one with some variety to it. By trial and error I've found some very
> unsound lines it will always play, invariably leading to lost
> positions. Some examples (applet is Black in each case):
>
> 1. d4 c5 2. d5 Qa5+ 3. Bd2 Qb6 4. Nc3 Qxb2?? 5. Rb1 Qa3 6. Nb5 Qxa2 7.
> Nc7+ Kd8 8. Nxa8 Na6 9. Ra1 Qb2 10. Rxa6 bxa6 11. Ba5+ Ke8 12. Nc7+
> Kd8 13. Nxa6+ Ke8 14. Nc7+ Kd8 15. Nb5+ Ke8 and White has an easily
> won game.
>
> 1. d4 c5 2. e4 cxd4 3. c3 Transposing to the Smith-Morra Gambit of the
> Siclian, a tricky line where an unbooked opponent can easily get into
> trouble. 3...dxc3 4. Nxc3 Nc6 5. Nf3 d6 6. Bc4 f5?? Dreadfully
> weakening to the kingside, and further opening up the game when Black
> is badly behind in development. White has a great advantage after
> either 7.Ng5, 7.exf5, 7.0-0, or 7.Qb3.
>
> 1. e4 d5 2. e5 Nc6?! =97 2...c5 seems more logical, to counteract
> White's next move. Black ends up getting an inferior form of Nimzovich
> Defense. 3. d4 f6 4. f4 Be6?! =97 Very strange. The program deploys in a
> very awkward manner over the next several moves. 5. Nf3 Nh6 6. Be3 Qd7
> 7. Nbd2 Nf5 8. Bf2 O-O-O =97 It seems too early to commit to queenside
> castling. White is in a better position to open lines on that wing
> than Black is on the kingside. 9. c3 g6 10. g4 Nh6 11. h3 Nf7 =97
> Black's postion is becoming seriously cramped. 12. b4 Bh6 13. Nb3 =A0=97
> Threatening 14.Nc5+-. If Black tries to prevent this by 13... b6 14.
> Ba6+ Kb8 15. b5 wins the Nc6 and perhaps more. 13...Nb8 =97 But this is
> even worse. 14. Nc5 Qc6 15. b5 Qb6 16. a4 a5 17. bxa6 bxa6 18. Rb1 Qc6
> 19. Qb3 and massive material loss is imminent. The program plays
> 19...Qxc5 at this point, tantamount to resigning.
>
> =A0 Besides early pawn-grabbing queen sorties, ill-advised
> counterthrusts, and awkward play in closed positions, it's also fond
> of unnecessary, counter-productive checks. For example, against a
> Colle System it plays 1.Nf3 e6 2.d4 Nf6 3.e3 Bb4+?! =97 A waste of time,
> allowing White to gain a tempo with a move he'd play anyway in this
> opening. 4.c3 Bd6? =97 Why put the bishop here? 5.Bd3 0-0 6.e4 Be7 and
> due to the moves Black has wasted with the bishop, White already has a
> definite advantage.
>
> =A0 I don't want to give a misleading impression here. The program has
> beaten me a number of times, when I was too careless or inept to think
> at least 6-ply deep, as it always does. But once these flawed lines
> are discovered, one can just repeat them to beat the program over and
> over.



 
Date: 10 Feb 2009 09:45:34
From: Taylor Kingston
Subject: Re: New address for JBremboCE
On Feb 8, 6:34=A0am, Gianluca Cisana <g...@nospam.com > wrote:
> I've put the applet JBremboCE on a new website because the old one is
> often slow or off-line. The new web address is:
>
> http://bremboce.altervista.org
>
> Bye, Gianluca

Gianluca, I noticed one other improvement you should make:
underpromotion. Right now pawns are automatically promoted to queen.
While this is the usual choice, you should also give the player the
possibility of rook, bishop or knight, as required by the rules.


  
Date: 10 Feb 2009 20:05:26
From: Gianluca Cisana
Subject: Re: New address for JBremboCE
Actually the computer can underpromote, the opponent can't because I
haven't implemented the interface for the choice! I've written this on
my to do list.
Thankyou for your advice and testing.

Bye, Gianluca

http://bremboce.altervista.org

Taylor Kingston ha scritto:
> On Feb 8, 6:34 am, Gianluca Cisana <g...@nospam.com> wrote:
>
> Gianluca, I noticed one other improvement you should make:
> underpromotion. Right now pawns are automatically promoted to queen.
> While this is the usual choice, you should also give the player the
> possibility of rook, bishop or knight, as required by the rules.


 
Date: 09 Feb 2009 17:03:29
From: Taylor Kingston
Subject: Re: New address for JBremboCE
On Feb 8, 6:34=A0am, Gianluca Cisana <g...@nospam.com > wrote:
> I've put the applet JBremboCE on a new website because the old one is
> often slow or off-line. The new web address is:
>
> http://bremboce.altervista.org
>
> Bye, Gianluca

This address works much better than the other. Thank you.