Main
Date: 02 Feb 2009 05:31:52
From: John Robis
Subject: Nf3 is the best, perfect first move
1. Nf3

This is the first, perfect initial move that will continue along a path to
solving the game.






 
Date: 19 Feb 2009 06:33:35
From: greg
Subject: Re: Nf3 is the best, perfect first move
On Feb 2, 12:31=A0am, "John Robis" <jro...@spacemail.net > wrote:
> 1. Nf3
>
> This is the first, perfect initial move that will continue along a path t=
o
> solving the game.




what do you think about the moves 1.Nf3 e5?

Is there a name for this opening?


  
Date: 19 Feb 2009 07:28:42
From: Taylor Kingston
Subject: Re: Nf3 is the best, perfect first move
On Feb 19, 9:33=A0am, greg <gregklu...@gmail.com > wrote:
> On Feb 2, 12:31=A0am, "John Robis" <jro...@spacemail.net> wrote:
>
> > 1. Nf3
>
> > This is the first, perfect initial move that will continue along a path=
to
> > solving the game.
>
> what do you think about the moves 1.Nf3 =A0e5?
>
> Is there a name for this opening?

"The Oxford Companion to Chess" (2nd edition) gives the moves and
names for 1,327 openings, variations and sub-variations, but 1.Nf3 e5
is not mentioned. It reminds me a bit of the Irish Gambit (1.e4 e5
2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Nxe5??). I suppose if White is not paying attention it
could transpose into a normal double-KP line or reversed Alekhine's
Defense, but I suspect after the natural 2.Nxe5 most players of the
black side would say "Oh, hell!" or some such expletive, and the line
would be named accordingly.

Interestingly, in the oldest example I can find of this line in
actual play, the black side is handled by none other than world
champion Emanuel Lasker:

[Event "USA tour sim"]
[Site "USA"]
[Date "1907.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "NN"]
[Black "Lasker, Emanuel"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "A04"]
[PlyCount "45"]
[EventDate "1907.??.??"]
[EventType "simul"]
[EventRounds "1"]
[EventCountry "USA"]
[Source "ChessBase"]
[SourceDate "1998.11.10"]

1. Nf3 e5 2. Nxe5 c5 3. d4 cxd4 4. Qxd4 d6 5. Nf3 Nc6 6. Qd1 Nf6 7.
Nc3 d5 8. Bg5 d4 9. Bxf6 gxf6 10. Ne4 f5 11. Ned2 f4 12. c3 dxc3 13.
bxc3 Bg7 14. Ne4 Qa5 15. Qd2 O-O 16. Rc1 Bf5 17. Nd6 Rad8 18. Nxb7 Qa3
19. Nxd8 Rxd8 20. Nd4 Nxd4 21. cxd4 Rxd4 22. Rc3 Qb4 23. Rd3 0-1.
Black has a forced mate: 23...Qb1+ 24.Qd1 Rxd3 25.exd3 Bc3+ 26.Ke2
Bg4+ 27.f3 Qxa2+ 28.Qd2 Qxd2#

The game was played in a simul in Topeka, Kansas on 13 June 1907,
shortly after Lasker's title match with Marshall. Black's play is so
strange that I would normally doubt the game's authenticity, but it
was published in Lasker's own chess magazine, vol. 6 p. 151, according
to Whyld's "Collected Games of Emanuel Lasker."
Lasker is the only really prominent master I can find playing this
line on the CB MegaDatabase 2005. The ChessBase statistics for Black
are not encouraging: in 30 games White scored +22 -7 =3D1, and in the
games where White played 2.Nxe5 the score was +20 -5 =3D0.


 
Date: 05 Feb 2009 16:57:09
From: jefk
Subject: Re: Nf3 is the best, perfect first move
On 2 feb, 06:31, "John Robis" <jro...@spacemail.net > wrote:
> 1. Nf3
>
> This is the first, perfect initial move that will continue along a path to
> solving the game.

1..c5 2.e4 d6 leading to Najdorf;
draw
1..d5 also leads to a draw but thats another story
chess doesnt have to be solved coz its a draw
even Steinitz knew this.


  
Date: 06 Feb 2009 07:14:35
From: Poutnik
Subject: Re: Nf3 is the best, perfect first move
In article <073e85cf-bf26-4f6b-9740-dab4eec66575
@p23g2000prp.googlegroups.com >, kec@wanadoo.nl says...
>
> 1..c5 2.e4 d6 leading to Najdorf;
> draw
> 1..d5 also leads to a draw but thats another story
> chess doesnt have to be solved coz its a draw
> even Steinitz knew this.

Yes, it is draw, unless one makes mistake(s).
Chess is about leading or forcing opponent to do that.

--
Poutnik


 
Date: 02 Feb 2009 07:22:03
From: Poutnik
Subject: Re: Nf3 is the best, perfect first move
In article <czvhl.689$eK2.273@nwrddc01.gnilink.net >,
jrobis@spacemail.net says...
>
> 1. Nf3
>
> This is the first, perfect initial move that will continue along a path to
> solving the game.

Czech GM Dr. Reti invented it and successfully used it against
Capablanca. The first defeat after several years.

--
Poutnik


  
Date: 09 Feb 2009 10:17:37
From: William Hyde
Subject: Re: Nf3 is the best, perfect first move
On Feb 7, 6:04=A0pm, Taylor Kingston <tkings...@chittenden.com > wrote:
> On Feb 7, 3:47=A0pm, William Hyde <wthyde1...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>

>
> =A0 I wonder if your opponent had been reading "An Opening Repertoire
> for the Attacking Player" by Keene and Levy (Batsford, 1976).

Quite possibly. Jacques was determined to get a master rating and
studied quite hard. About this time he was in the habit of winning
the Toronto Reserves (the qualification event for the next year's
Closed) - in fact he won it a few months after this game (we drew in
that event, after he missed a chance to wipe me out brilliantly).

> > 10Bh6

This is really the move I should have called stereotypical. It's true
that I want to eliminate the g7 bishop at some point but this is
premature, resulting in the time lost with the queen. I forget what I
decided was best here, possibly h4 or even some attempt to get my king
into safety. The bishop is doing good work on g5, there's no need to
move it just yet.


> =A0 This is a fascinating position, full of possibilities. I let Fritz8
> go at it for some time, and the move it came up with was intriguing:
> 20...Rbe8. This looks counter-intuitive and illogical compared to the
> text, since it seems more natural to keep the QR on the half-open b-
> file and increase the KR's scope by putting it on the open e-file.
> However, there is a reason to prefer 20...Rbe8, which becomes apparent
> only if we go deep into the variations.

What I saw over the board I can't remember any longer, but I bet it
wasn't even
a fraction of this.

> =A0 After 20...Rbe8, Fritz sees best play as something like this: 21.Qh3
> (if 21.Qg3 Ne4) 21...Re7 (adding a defender to h7) 22.Kf1 Kh8 23.Qf5
> d4! 24.Nd5 Nxd5 25.Qxd5 Qd2!, and White is in serious trouble, viz.
> 26.Bxc4 Qxf4 27.Qg2 Ne5 28.Bf7 (if 28.Bxa6 Nxg6 29.Bd3 [or if 29.Rh3
> Re3 30.Rh5 Nh4 31.Rxh4 Qxh4 32.Bb7 d3 wins] 29...Nh4 30.Qg1 Qe3 31.Rd1
> Rg7-+) 28...Rexf7 29.gxf7 Qxf7 30.Rh3 Ng4 31.Kg1 Nxf2 32.Rb3 c4 33.Rb7
> Qf6 34.Rf1 Rg8-+.
> =A0 The critical difference with 20...Rfe8 is seen if the same five
> moves follow: 21.Qh3 Re7 22.Kf1 Kh8 23.Qf5 d4 24.Nd5 Nxd5 25.Qxd5 Qd2,
> and now White has the amazing 26.Qe4!!. If 26...Rxe4?? ruin follows
> with 27.Rxh7+ Kg8 28.Bxc4+ Re6 (or 28...Kf8 29.g7+ Ke7 30.g8Q+ Kd6
> 31.Qd5+ Kc7 32.Qxd7+ Kb6 33.Qc7#) 29.Bxe6+ Kf8 30.g7+ Ke7 31.g8Q+ Kd6
> 32.Rxd7+ Kc6 33.Qxb8 and mate shortly). Therefore Black would be
> forced into 26...Rg7 27.Bxc4 with considerable advantage to White.
> =A0 In the 20...Rbe8 line, the critical difference is that 26.Qe4
> doesn't work, because after 26...Rxe4 27.Rxh7+ Kg8 28.Bxc4+ Black has
> still has his KR in position to interpose by 28...Rf7!-+. A clear case
> of concrete analysis trumping general principles.

Nimzovich, though, might say that I had violated general principles
earlier, by decentralizing with Bh6. This maneuver of using the
"active" rook instead of the passive one reminds me of a position
given in "My System" where Nimzovich does the same thing. Various
authors tell us that the rook is a lousy defensive piece, but there
are exceptions.


William Hyde


  
Date: 07 Feb 2009 15:04:01
From: Taylor Kingston
Subject: Re: Nf3 is the best, perfect first move
On Feb 7, 3:47=A0pm, William Hyde <wthyde1...@gmail.com > wrote:
> You fiend, Taylor! My games are buried in =A0the detritus of at least
> five moves (and the two boxes of chess papers that mysteriously
> vanished in Halifax). =A0But I'm sure I had a decent NF3 game published
> in the APCT magazine 1991-ish, so I went looking for it.
>
> Result, one very dusty Saturday afternoon. =A0One half-alphabeticized
> chess collection. =A0A ton of ancient corporate reports thrown out, many
> old issues of APCT and Franklin Campbell's team newsletter found, and
> perused with nostalgic pleasure, but not the crucial ones.
>
> Well, I think I will be ready to try again some time in 2010. =A0But I
> did find this, though it is nothing like a neo-Catalan, or even a
> Catalan.
>
> Hyde - J. Van Leusden, in the year of the consulate of Metellus Celer
> and Lucius Afranius (also known as 1980).
>
> Played on a Friday night when I was really more in the mood for a
> pint. =A0On the other hand winning this game would leave me with a good
> shot at a prize. =A0We were both rated about 2000 at the time.

A fascinating game, Bill. Thanks for posting it. Much more
competitive than mine. I'm not going to attempt a full analysis, but I
have a few comments, particularly at move 20.

> 1Nf3 d6
> 2d4
>
> Somewhat hesitantly played. =A0I finally decided that if he wanted to
> transpose to the KID, without the option of the Grunfeld (which I
> didn't know at all) it was OK with me. =A0And if he got into some sort
> of Pirc (which I played) I had some lines I wanted to try out because
> I'd had =A0trouble with them myself. But it was difficult for a
> hypermodern such as myself to actually play d4 so soon. It felt a bit
> like treason.
>
> 2...Nf6
> 3c4 Bg4
> 4Nc3 Bxf3
>
> A master who shall remain nameless told me later that at this point
> black had equalized. =A0I don't think he was drinking, either.

I wonder if your opponent had been reading "An Opening Repertoire
for the Attacking Player" by Keene and Levy (Batsford, 1976). That
book recommended 1...d6 in reply to 1.Nf3, transposing either to the
Pirc in the event White played Nb1-c3 and e2-e4, or if as here 3.c4,
then 3...Bg4, which they called an Old Indian Defense, Tartakower
variation.

> I'd had this pawn formation as black in two recent games against
> stronger players and had won them both (and I was to have it again in
> this event and win). =A0A bishop pair, open file, and slight central
> preponderance has to outweigh the theoretical weakness of the king
> side pawns.
>
> 5gf g6
> 6Bg5
>
> Stereotypical, but this isn't going to be a subtle game. =A0I never
> considered the alternate plan of opening the game for the bishop pair.

K&L don't say much about this, except to note that "Black must take
care to play QN-Q2 at once to avoid doubling of his KB pawn."

> 6... Bg7

Varying from the game K&L cited, Kluger-Petrosian, Leipzig 1960, in
which Black played c7-c6, e7-e6, and developed his KB on e7 and queen
on c7, in a sort of hedgehog formation.

> 7e4 Nbd7
> 8Qd2 c5
> 9d5 a6
> 10Bh6 0-0
> 11Be2 Qa5
> 12h4
>
> Possibly my last reasonable chance to move my king to safety. =A0I'm
> betting that my attack will come first.
>
> 12 ... Bxh6
> 13Qxh6 b5
>
> At this point I thought for a long time. =A0I'm attacking on the king
> side, so surely I want to keep my queen where it is. =A0But I couldn't
> make the variations work, Jacques' counter-play is significant and =A0I
> can't afford to have my queen cut off on h6. =A0So...
>
> 14 Qe3 bc4
> 15f4 Rab8
> 16Rb1 e6
>
> It seems that I am going to have time to get to the pub. =A0Either I win
> on the kingside or die in the centre. =A0This is unlikely to be a long
> game.
>
> 17de fe
> 18h5 d5
> 19ed ed
> 20hg Rfe8

This is a fascinating position, full of possibilities. I let Fritz8
go at it for some time, and the move it came up with was intriguing:
20...Rbe8. This looks counter-intuitive and illogical compared to the
text, since it seems more natural to keep the QR on the half-open b-
file and increase the KR's scope by putting it on the open e-file.
However, there is a reason to prefer 20...Rbe8, which becomes apparent
only if we go deep into the variations.
After 20...Rbe8, Fritz sees best play as something like this: 21.Qh3
(if 21.Qg3 Ne4) 21...Re7 (adding a defender to h7) 22.Kf1 Kh8 23.Qf5
d4! 24.Nd5 Nxd5 25.Qxd5 Qd2!, and White is in serious trouble, viz.
26.Bxc4 Qxf4 27.Qg2 Ne5 28.Bf7 (if 28.Bxa6 Nxg6 29.Bd3 [or if 29.Rh3
Re3 30.Rh5 Nh4 31.Rxh4 Qxh4 32.Bb7 d3 wins] 29...Nh4 30.Qg1 Qe3 31.Rd1
Rg7-+) 28...Rexf7 29.gxf7 Qxf7 30.Rh3 Ng4 31.Kg1 Nxf2 32.Rb3 c4 33.Rb7
Qf6 34.Rf1 Rg8-+.
The critical difference with 20...Rfe8 is seen if the same five
moves follow: 21.Qh3 Re7 22.Kf1 Kh8 23.Qf5 d4 24.Nd5 Nxd5 25.Qxd5 Qd2,
and now White has the amazing 26.Qe4!!. If 26...Rxe4?? ruin follows
with 27.Rxh7+ Kg8 28.Bxc4+ Re6 (or 28...Kf8 29.g7+ Ke7 30.g8Q+ Kd6
31.Qd5+ Kc7 32.Qxd7+ Kb6 33.Qc7#) 29.Bxe6+ Kf8 30.g7+ Ke7 31.g8Q+ Kd6
32.Rxd7+ Kc6 33.Qxb8 and mate shortly). Therefore Black would be
forced into 26...Rg7 27.Bxc4 with considerable advantage to White.
In the 20...Rbe8 line, the critical difference is that 26.Qe4
doesn't work, because after 26...Rxe4 27.Rxh7+ Kg8 28.Bxc4+ Black has
still has his KR in position to interpose by 28...Rf7!-+. A clear case
of concrete analysis trumping general principles.

> 21Qh3 d4
>
> The annotator suggested Re7 or Rb6 as defensive alternatives.
>
> 22 Kf1
>
> This is my favourite move of the game. =A0Not that it is brilliant, but
> the winning move in a middlegame isn't often a king move. =A0The move
> unpins both the Be2 and Nc3.

It is indeed a fine move, the best on the board, one your opponent
probably did not consider.

> 22 ... Rxe2
>
> (22 ...Qxc3 23 bc Rb1+ 24Kg2 Rxh1 25 Bxc4+ Kg7 26Qxh1 +/- or
>
> 22 ... dc3 23Bxc4+ Kf8 24 gh +-
>
> according to the annotator. =A0I no longer recall my analysis.)
>
> 23 Nxe2 Qxa2

This loses immediately. If Black had any hope, it lay in 23...Re8,
though White probably should still win, e.g. 24.Ng3 Qxa2 25.Qf5 Re7
26.gxh7+ Nxh7 27.Qg6+ Rg7 28.Qe6+ Rf7 29.Re1 Ndf8 30.Qd5 etc.

>
> 24Qe6+ Kh8
>
> 25Kg2 =A0Rxb2
>
> 26 Qf7
>
> I spent most of my last few minutes on this move (so much for the trip
> to the pub, but I couldn't really afford it anyway) not because it is
> hard, but because I couldn't believe I'd gotten away with it. =A0I was
> sure I was hallucinating.
>
> 1-0
>
> William Hyde



  
Date: 07 Feb 2009 12:47:45
From: William Hyde
Subject: Re: Nf3 is the best, perfect first move

You fiend, Taylor! My games are buried in the detritus of at least
five moves (and the two boxes of chess papers that mysteriously
vanished in Halifax). But I'm sure I had a decent NF3 game published
in the APCT magazine 1991-ish, so I went looking for it.

Result, one very dusty Saturday afternoon. One half-alphabeticized
chess collection. A ton of ancient corporate reports thrown out, many
old issues of APCT and Franklin Campbell's team newsletter found, and
perused with nostalgic pleasure, but not the crucial ones.

Well, I think I will be ready to try again some time in 2010. But I
did find this, though it is nothing like a neo-Catalan, or even a
Catalan.

Hyde - J. Van Leusden, in the year of the consulate of Metellus Celer
and Lucius Afranius (also known as 1980).

Played on a Friday night when I was really more in the mood for a
pint. On the other hand winning this game would leave me with a good
shot at a prize. We were both rated about 2000 at the time.

1Nf3 d6
2d4

Somewhat hesitantly played. I finally decided that if he wanted to
transpose to the KID, without the option of the Grunfeld (which I
didn't know at all) it was OK with me. And if he got into some sort
of Pirc (which I played) I had some lines I wanted to try out because
I'd had trouble with them myself. But it was difficult for a
hypermodern such as myself to actually play d4 so soon. It felt a bit
like treason.

2...Nf6
3c4 Bg4
4Nc3 Bxf3

A master who shall remain nameless told me later that at this point
black had equalized. I don't think he was drinking, either.

I'd had this pawn formation as black in two recent games against
stronger players and had won them both (and I was to have it again in
this event and win). A bishop pair, open file, and slight central
preponderance has to outweigh the theoretical weakness of the king
side pawns.

5gf g6
6Bg5

Stereotypical, but this isn't going to be a subtle game. I never
considered the alternate plan of opening the game for the bishop pair.

6... Bg7
7e4 Nbd7
8Qd2 c5
9d5 a6
10Bh6 0-0
11Be2 Qa5
12h4

Possibly my last reasonable chance to move my king to safety. I'm
betting that my attack will come first.

12 ... Bxh6
13Qxh6 b5

At this point I thought for a long time. I'm attacking on the king
side, so surely I want to keep my queen where it is. But I couldn't
make the variations work, Jacques' counter-play is significant and I
can't afford to have my queen cut off on h6. So...

14 Qe3 bc4
15f4 Rab8
16Rb1 e6

It seems that I am going to have time to get to the pub. Either I win
on the kingside or die in the centre. This is unlikely to be a long
game.

17de fe
18h5 d5
19ed ed
20hg Rfe8
21Qh3 d4

The annotator suggested Re7 or Rb6 as defensive alternatives.

22 Kf1

This is my favourite move of the game. Not that it is brilliant, but
the winning move in a middlegame isn't often a king move. The move
unpins both the Be2 and Nc3.

22 ... Rxe2

(22 ...Qxc3 23 bc Rb1+ 24Kg2 Rxh1 25 Bxc4+ Kg7 26Qxh1 +/- or

22 ... dc3 23Bxc4+ Kf8 24 gh +-

according to the annotator. I no longer recall my analysis.)

23 Nxe2 Qxa2

24Qe6+ Kh8

25Kg2 Rxb2

26 Qf7

I spent most of my last few minutes on this move (so much for the trip
to the pub, but I couldn't really afford it anyway) not because it is
hard, but because I couldn't believe I'd gotten away with it. I was
sure I was hallucinating.

1-0


William Hyde



  
Date: 03 Feb 2009 15:12:27
From:
Subject: Re: Nf3 is the best, perfect first move
On Feb 3, 4:41=A0pm, William Hyde <wthyde1...@gmail.com > wrote:
> On Feb 2, 6:04=A0pm, taylor.kings...@comcast.net wrote:
>
> > On Feb 2, 5:46=A0pm, William Hyde <wthyde1...@gmail.com> wrote:
> > =A0 I've played it quite a lot myself. It's flexible. Depending on
> > Black's reply, you can go into a Reti, a Colle, a QG, a KIA, an
> > English, a Barry Attack, even a 150 Attack if Black goes Pirc.
>
> Don't forget the Neo-Catalan. =A0I was told by a stronger player about
> the "bargain (1) transpositions into the Neo-Catalan". =A0I had a vague
> idea what the N-C was, but that's all. =A0Then I showed him one of my
> games in which, naturally, I had transposed to a favourable Neo-
> Catalan without knowing it.
>
> Later I found that Keene's "Flank openings" has a good section on the
> Neo-Catalan.

I seldom see a Neo-Catalan, probably because I tend to play Nb1-c3
at an early stage if a favorable transposition is in the offing. Case
in point is this game, from the 2001 USATE, round 6:

T. Kingston - M. McDermott (1948): 1. Nf3 Nf6 2. d4 g6 3. Nc3

Black was probably expecting a nice KID without having to worry
about a Saemisch or Four Pawns Attack. This changes the complexion of
the game, however. Now he basically has to choose between a Barry
Attack after 3...d5 4.Bf4, or a Pirc if he does not advance the d-pawn
two squares. In this case he goes for the Pirc, but he clearly is not
well booked on it.

3...Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. Be3 Ng4?!

Black is clearly ad-libbing here. Anyone playing the 150 Attack
(5.Be3) actually hopes for this.

6. Bg5 h6 7. Bh4 c5 8. h3 cxd4 9. Nxd4 Ne5 10. f4 Nec6

Now the game has become a sort of weird Sicilan in which Black's KN
has migrated to the queenside with notable loss of time. White
definitely stands better.

11. Bf2 a6 12. Qd2 b5 13. O-O-O O-O

As Buffalo Springfield sang, "There's battle lines being drawn."

14. g4

Forward!

14...Qa5 15. Kb1 b4 16. Nd5 Nxd4?? 17. Bxd4?!

I had just gotten back from the restroom and, noticing that my
knight had been captured, I recaptured automatically without thinking.
Of course 17.Nxe7+ was better. I was mentally kicking myself as soon
as I punched my clock, but I kept a poker face.

17...Bxd4??

Thank you, Caissa! I get a second chance. The game is basically over
now.

18. Nxe7+ Kh7 19. Qxd4 Be6 20. Bc4 Re8 21. Bxe6 Rxe7 22. Bd5 Raa7 23.
f5 Rac7 24. Qf6 Qc5 25. Bxf7! Qxc2+

Check, schmeck. He has no real attack, but I do.

26. Ka1 Rxf7 27. fxg6+ Kg8 28. gxf7+ Rxf7 29. Qg6+ Kf8 30. Rhf1

Of course 30.Qxd6+ was playable, but the text allows complete
simplification.

30...Qc4 31. Rxf7+ Qxf7 32. Qxf7+ Kxf7 33. Rxd6 Kg7 34. Rb6 Nd7 35.
Rb7 1-0

> (1) Bargain (n), also Barg, a good move, originally from the concept
> of economical use of force. =A0Eventually coming to mean a good plan or
> good position, also.
>
> William Hyde

How about you show us a good Neo-Catalan game of yours, Bill?



  
Date: 03 Feb 2009 13:41:15
From: William Hyde
Subject: Re: Nf3 is the best, perfect first move
On Feb 2, 6:04=A0pm, taylor.kings...@comcast.net wrote:
> On Feb 2, 5:46=A0pm, William Hyde <wthyde1...@gmail.com> wrote:

> =A0 I've played it quite a lot myself. It's flexible. Depending on
> Black's reply, you can go into a Reti, a Colle, a QG, a KIA, an
> English, a Barry Attack, even a 150 Attack if Black goes Pirc.

Don't forget the Neo-Catalan. I was told by a stronger player about
the "bargain (1) transpositions into the Neo-Catalan". I had a vague
idea what the N-C was, but that's all. Then I showed him one of my
games in which, naturally, I had transposed to a favourable Neo-
Catalan without knowing it.

Later I found that Keene's "Flank openings" has a good section on the
Neo-Catalan.

(1) Bargain (n), also Barg, a good move, originally from the concept
of economical use of force. Eventually coming to mean a good plan or
good position, also.


William Hyde



  
Date: 03 Feb 2009 10:49:31
From:
Subject: Re: Nf3 is the best, perfect first move
On Feb 3, 1:21=A0pm, bull...@gmail.com wrote:
> On 2 Feb, 23:04, taylor.kings...@comcast.net wrote:
>
> > On Feb 2, 5:46=A0pm, William Hyde <wthyde1...@gmail.com> wrote:
> > > Whereas Chernev said that 1e4 is the best move, and that 1d4 is the
> > > best move.
>
> > =A0 And Breyer said that after 1.e4 White's game is in its last throes!
>
> http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/extra/breyer.htmlcasts some doubts
> on this... Tartakower wrote that Breyer had written this, but he had
> apparently been told this by Reti; Reti later quoted Tartakower's
> quotation, which suggests at least that he couldn't remember the
> original source.

True, but not Cartesian Doubt. ;-)


  
Date: 03 Feb 2009 10:21:34
From:
Subject: Re: Nf3 is the best, perfect first move
On 2 Feb, 23:04, taylor.kings...@comcast.net wrote:
> On Feb 2, 5:46=A0pm, William Hyde <wthyde1...@gmail.com> wrote:
> > Whereas Chernev said that 1e4 is the best move, and that 1d4 is the
> > best move.
>
> =A0 And Breyer said that after 1.e4 White's game is in its last throes!

http://www.chesshistory.com/winter/extra/breyer.html casts some doubts
on this... Tartakower wrote that Breyer had written this, but he had
apparently been told this by Reti; Reti later quoted Tartakower's
quotation, which suggests at least that he couldn't remember the
original source.


  
Date: 02 Feb 2009 14:46:28
From: William Hyde
Subject: Re: Nf3 is the best, perfect first move
On Feb 2, 9:31=A0am, taylor.kings...@comcast.net wrote:

> =A0 Before Reti ever pushed a pawn, 1.Nf3 was called the Zukertort
> Opening, from its being played by the great Johannes Hermann Zukertort
> (1842-1888). However, after 1...d5 he tended to play 2.d4,

I seem to remember reading that Zukertort started this way so as to
limit black's choices. I no longer recall the precise line Zukertort
was avoiding but I think it had something to do with an early ... e5.
Albin did not begin his tournament career until late in life, but
possibly someone played the Albin counter gambit before Albin
himself.


> =A0 Debatable. Fischer said 1.e4 was "best by test,"

But now we know Fischer only said that to fool the Soviets!

Whereas Chernev said that 1e4 is the best move, and that 1d4 is the
best move.

1Nf3 has been the best move - for me. I scored much better with
that than with 1e4. Mainly because it would result in positions in
which neither player knew the theory, as opposed to positions where
only I didn't know theory.

William Hyde



  
Date: 02 Feb 2009 15:04:43
From:
Subject: Re: Nf3 is the best, perfect first move
On Feb 2, 5:46=A0pm, William Hyde <wthyde1...@gmail.com > wrote:
> On Feb 2, 9:31=A0am, taylor.kings...@comcast.net wrote:
>
> > =A0 Before Reti ever pushed a pawn, 1.Nf3 was called the Zukertort
> > Opening, from its being played by the great Johannes Hermann Zukertort
> > (1842-1888). However, after 1...d5 he tended to play 2.d4,
>
> I seem to remember reading that Zukertort started this way so as to
> limit black's choices. I no longer recall the precise line Zukertort
> was avoiding but I think it had something to do with an early ... e5.
> Albin did not begin his tournament career until late in life, but
> possibly someone played =A0the Albin counter gambit before Albin
> himself.

Checking ChessBase, I can't find any instance of the Albin
Countergambit prior to Albin himself playing it against Lasker at New
York 1893, 5 years after Zukertort died. I can't find anyone playing
the Englund (1.d4 e5?!) against Zukertort either.
However, CB is hardly the final word on this sort of thing, and
perhaps Zukertort decided on 1.Nf3 based on home analysis and/or
casual games, rather than, say, an unpleasant experience in a formal
tournament game.

> > =A0 Debatable. Fischer said 1.e4 was "best by test,"
>
> But now we know Fischer only said that to fool the Soviets!
>
> Whereas Chernev said that 1e4 is the best move, and that 1d4 is the
> best move.

And Breyer said that after 1.e4 White's game is in its last throes!

> 1Nf3 has been =A0the best move =A0- for me. =A0I scored much better with
> that than with 1e4. =A0Mainly because it would result in positions in
> which neither player knew the theory, as opposed to positions where
> only I didn't know theory.

I've played it quite a lot myself. It's flexible. Depending on
Black's reply, you can go into a Reti, a Colle, a QG, a KIA, an
English, a Barry Attack, even a 150 Attack if Black goes Pirc.


  
Date: 02 Feb 2009 06:31:59
From:
Subject: Re: Nf3 is the best, perfect first move
On Feb 2, 2:18=A0am, Offramp <alaneobr...@gmail.com > wrote:
> On Feb 2, 6:22=A0am, Poutnik <poutnikletspamisoutofa...@atlas.cz> wrote:
>
> > In article <czvhl.689$eK2....@nwrddc01.gnilink.net>,
> > jro...@spacemail.net says...
> > > 1. Nf3
> > Czech GM Dr. Reti invented it and successfully used it against
> > Capablanca. The first defeat after several years.
>
> R=E9ti invented it did he? Had no one else ever played it?

Before Reti ever pushed a pawn, 1.Nf3 was called the Zukertort
Opening, from its being played by the great Johannes Hermann Zukertort
(1842-1888). However, after 1...d5 he tended to play 2.d4, and the
game usually transposed into what we now call the Colle-Zukertort
System (a Colle with a QB fianchetto), or to Queen's Gambit-like
lines.
Reti's innovation was to follow 1.Nf3 d5 with 2.c4, and then the
fianchetto of both bishops.

> This is the first, perfect initial move that will continue along a path t=
o
> solving the game.

Debatable. Fischer said 1.e4 was "best by test," while Berliner
based his book "The System" on the premise that 1.d4 should ultimately
win by force.

Out of historical interest I checked my database for the earliest
example of 1.Nf3 d5 2.c4. Turns out it was played long before Reti was
born, although White here turned it into a sort of reversed Czech
Benoni.


[Event "St Petersburg m1"]
[Site "St Petersburg"]
[Date "1854.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Shumov, Ilia S"]
[Black "Von Jaenisch, Carl Friedrich"]
[Result "0-1"]
[ECO "A09"]
[PlyCount "86"]
[EventDate "1854.??.??"]
[EventType "match"]
[EventRounds "12"]
[EventCountry "RUS"]
[Source "ChessBase"]
[SourceDate "2001.11.25"]

1. Nf3 d5 2. c4 d4 3. e4 c5 4. d3 Nc6 5. Bf4 e6 6. Be2 Bd6 7. Qd2 Qc7
8. Bxd6 Qxd6 9. Qg5 g6 10. Na3 a6 11. O-O f6 12. Qh4 e5 13. Nd2 h5 14.
f4 exf4 15. Qxf4 Qxf4 16. Rxf4 Ne5 17. h3 Be6 18. Nc2 b5 19. b4 bxc4
20. bxc5 cxd3 21. Nxd4 Bxa2 22. Rxa2 dxe2 23. Nxe2 Nd3 24. Rf3 Nxc5
25. Rc3 Nd7 26. Nf4 Ne7 27. Ne6 Kf7 28. Nc7 Rhc8 29. Nxa8 Rxc3 30.
Rxa6 Nc5 31. Rd6 Nc8 32. Rd8 Ne6 33. Rd7+ Ke8 34. Rb7 Rc2 35. Nb3 Nd6
36. Rb8+ Rc8 37. Rxc8+ Nxc8 38. Kf2 Kd7 39. Na5 Kd6 40. Ke3 Kc5 41.
Nb3+ Kc6 42. Nd4+ Nxd4 43. Kxd4 Ne7 {The Chess Players Chronicle 1854,
p. 102} 0-1



  
Date: 01 Feb 2009 23:18:29
From: Offramp
Subject: Re: Nf3 is the best, perfect first move
On Feb 2, 6:22=A0am, Poutnik <poutnikletspamisoutofa...@atlas.cz > wrote:
> In article <czvhl.689$eK2....@nwrddc01.gnilink.net>,
> jro...@spacemail.net says...

> > 1. Nf3

> Czech GM Dr. Reti invented it and successfully used it against
> Capablanca. The first defeat after several years.

R=E9ti invented it did he? Had no one else ever played it?


   
Date: 02 Feb 2009 17:59:04
From: Poutnik
Subject: Re: Nf3 is the best, perfect first move
In article <ebcdee0e-f081-4713-94ad-
492eedb5ec8c@q35g2000vbi.googlegroups.com >, alaneobrien@gmail.com=20
says...
>=20
> On Feb 2, 6:22=A0am, Poutnik <poutnikletspamisoutofa...@atlas.cz> wrote:
> > In article <czvhl.689$eK2....@nwrddc01.gnilink.net>,
> > jro...@spacemail.net says...
>=20
> > > 1. Nf3
>=20
> > Czech GM Dr. Reti invented it and successfully used it against
> > Capablanca. The first defeat after several years.
>=20
> R=E9ti invented it did he? Had no one else ever played it?

OK, I am almost sure wrong.

He could only put it in use among GM class,=20
or improve it and deeper analyze.

The only fact is this opening is named by his name.

--=20
Poutnik


   
Date: 02 Feb 2009 19:11:42
From: HiddenChamp
Subject: Re: Nf3 is the best, perfect first move

"Offramp" <alaneobrien@gmail.com > wrote in message
news:ebcdee0e-f081-4713-94ad-492eedb5ec8c@q35g2000vbi.googlegroups.com...
On Feb 2, 6:22 am, Poutnik <poutnikletspamisoutofa...@atlas.cz > wrote:
> In article <czvhl.689$eK2....@nwrddc01.gnilink.net>,
> jro...@spacemail.net says...

> > 1. Nf3

> Czech GM Dr. Reti invented it and successfully used it against
> Capablanca. The first defeat after several years.

>Réti invented it did he? Had no one else ever played it?

No, Not me. Cant say about other greats.