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Date: 29 Dec 2008 07:45:48
From: parrthenon@cs.com
Subject: CSI: two dead flies
CHESS WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP 1972: FISCHER VS. SPASSKY by Larry Evans and
Ken Smith.

When Fischer was leading 10-7 Geller lodged an "urgent request that
the playing hall and the things in it should be examined with the
assistance of competent experts and that the possibility of the
presence of any outsiders in the place allocated to the participants
should be excluded." -- August 22, 1972

GAME EIGHTEEN

When Bobby's aide, Fred Cramer, told him about the charges, Bobby let
out a loud guffaw.

"That shows the Russians are as dumb as the Americans. They could have
made a good case if they had only left the electronic and chemical
stuff out," said one grandmaster who went on to assert that Bobby's
assorted protests over filming and crowd noises were more disturbing
to Spassky than to the organizers of the match.

At last, a chemical and x-ray analysis was made of the playing area in
response to Russian charges that the place was "Bobby-trapped." A
checmistry professor who performed the investigation said: "We had
samples from the chairs, the air on the stage, the walls and both
sides of the chessboard. We put them all in plastic bags and named
them 'Fischer's chair' and 'Spassky's chair' and so on. These
specimens were subjected to various fluid and whirled in a centrifuge.
They were exactly alike."

A Reykjavik electrical engineer examined the huge lighting fixture
over the stage. "After a careful examineation I found two dead flies,"
he said.

Richard Stein, a lawyer for movie producer Chester Fox, arrived here
with a court order to attach Fischer's prize money and to serve a 1.75
million dollar damage suit against Bobby, who refused to allow Fox to
film the match. Stein said he would try one more time to persuade
Fischer to allow filming of the remaining games.

There was word here that Soviet officials, incensed at Fischer's pre-
game antics, had ordered Boris to return home, but Spassky politely
refused.




 
Date: 29 Dec 2008 18:53:32
From: help bot
Subject: Re: CSI: two dead flies
On Dec 29, 9:33=A0pm, Offramp <alaneobr...@gmail.com > wrote:

> > A Reykjavik electrical engineer examined the huge lighting fixture
> > over the stage. "After a careful examination I found two dead flies,"
> > he said.

> Two flies seems rather a lot for Iceland. What had they died of?


Obviously, whatever they used on Mr. Spassky
to disrupt his concentration and make him play
impulsively (see Mr. Geller's comments) had an
even worse affect on these unfortunate flies.

The peculiar obsession over which chair was
Mr. Fischer's and which Mr. Spassky's holds a
clue; add in the strange X-ray results: the filled-in
part of Mr. Spassky's chair -- and not a moment
too soon -- and you begin to see the light.

And speaking of lights, I am reminded once
again of the very peculiar goings-on in some
other matches involving Mr. Fischer. One
incident had the lights -- under the control of
the Fischer team -- going out at just the very
moment when Mr. Fischer's face reportedly
turned red, as the result of some home-cookin'
by the Russians in the chess openings battle.

Well, it is easy enough to explain why some
opponents might not have played as well as
usual, but there is no good explanation for the
exceedingly good play by Mr. Fischer, is
there? We have come full-circle, back to the
wild speculations regarding Mr. Botvinnik--
another guy whose opponents mysteriously
"underperformed", in the face of killer moves.


-- help bot




 
Date: 29 Dec 2008 18:33:44
From: Offramp
Subject: Re: CSI: two dead flies

> A Reykjavik electrical engineer examined the huge lighting fixture
> over the stage. "After a careful examination I found two dead flies,"
> he said.

Two flies seems rather a lot for Iceland. What had they died of?


 
Date: 29 Dec 2008 14:23:37
From:
Subject: Re: CSI: two dead flies
On Dec 29, 10:45=A0am, "parrthe...@cs.com" <parrthe...@cs.com > wrote:
> CHESS WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP 1972: FISCHER VS. SPASSKY by Larry Evans and
> Ken Smith.
>
> When Fischer was leading 10-7 Geller lodged an "urgent request that
> the playing hall and the things in it should be examined with the
> assistance of competent experts and that the possibility of the
> presence of any outsiders in the place allocated to the participants
> should be excluded." -- August 22, 1972
>
> GAME EIGHTEEN
>
> When Bobby's aide, Fred Cramer, told him about the charges, Bobby let
> out a loud guffaw.
>
> "That shows the Russians are as dumb as the Americans. They could have
> made a good case if they had only left the electronic and chemical
> stuff out," said one grandmaster who went on to assert that Bobby's
> assorted protests over filming and crowd noises were more disturbing
> to Spassky than to the organizers of the match.
>
> At last, a chemical and x-ray analysis was made of the playing area in
> response to Russian charges that the place was "Bobby-trapped." A
> checmistry professor who performed the investigation said: "We had
> samples from the chairs, the air on the stage, the walls and both
> sides of the chessboard. We put them all in plastic bags and named
> them 'Fischer's chair' and 'Spassky's chair' and so on. These
> specimens were subjected to various fluid and whirled in a centrifuge.
> They were exactly alike."

I have expected at this point in the story for a mysterious residue to
show up as result of the previous stealth visit of Sam "Inspector
Clouseau" Sloan - the chessic version of all 3 Marx brothers.

Maybe Chevy Chase is still interested in making a movie based on the
Adventures of Sloan, subtitled, 'How I almost screwed up a thaw in the
cold war plus the world chess championship"?

> A Reykjavik electrical engineer examined the huge lighting fixture
> over the stage. "After a careful examineation I found two dead flies,"
> he said.

And as we know, there are no flies on our Sam, lookit! -- > they're
on the damned chair!

> Richard Stein, a lawyer for movie producer Chester Fox, arrived here
> with a court order to attach Fischer's prize money and to serve a 1.75
> million dollar damage suit against Bobby, who refused to allow Fox to
> film the match. Stein said he would try one more time to persuade
> Fischer to allow filming of the remaining games.
>
> There was word here that Soviet officials, incensed at Fischer's pre-
> game antics, had ordered Boris to return home, but Spassky politely
> refused.

Laugh. In his own world Boris S was as 'bad' as RJF in his. If he
wasn't a chess genius, and chess so important to Soviet internal
propaganda, it would have been a psychiatric hospital for him, you
know, the ones where they inject really painful stuff into you until
you really do go nuts.

Whatever Kelp-twit misrepresented me as saying - Iceland was a huge
event for everyone - but like a gladitorial contest when one of the
participants must perish.

From a psychological perspective I see the same cynical attitude from
both East and West toward their respective heroes - a complete
indifference to human damage, the result of which was that both
players got out of their native countries as soon as they could manage
someplace to go.

In this sense they both perished.

Phil Innes