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Date: 31 Dec 2008 07:41:56
From:
Subject: Number 1 US Chess Magazine had good year
Chessville had another great year, despite being down for 8 weeks
because of floods and other disasters. Even so, it continues to surge
ahead as #1 US based chess magazine - though is received in 104
countries.

This last edition of 2008 features:

New column by Larry Tamarkin, and I recommend a look at his game
versus Maurice Ashley where if only he found that odd looking Q move,
he would have 'untangled' to achieve an equal game. He writes, ""After
a long pause I am back with annotated games from the Marshall Chess
Club's excellent 4-Rated Games Tonight! tournament. This event, run
by director Steve Immitt (and his subs when he is not available), is
one of the longest running continuing weekly chess tournaments in
America..." Includes Larry's "money-round" game against GM Maurice
Ashley."

Alekhine's Parrot notices a new world simul attempt, and also suggest
outsourcing all USCF functions except the ones it was created to
promote. Just for fun it also discusses beating Morphy, using Anand's
recent comment that Fischer wouldn't stand a chance these days.

Chessville also reports news in Spanish; as in; (12/27) Nuestro
C=EDrculo #334: 27 de deciembre de 2008, dedicado al ajedrecista ingl=E9s
Victor L. Wahltuch, cuya vida transcurri=F3 entre 1875 y 1953. Adem=E1s
de su biograf=EDa y partidas, puedes ver en este n=FAmero partidas de los
torneos Nanqu=EDn 2008, ganado por el G.M. Veselin Topalov, y Brasil
2008 cuyo primer lugar lo ocup=F3 el joven Maestro Internacional
brasile=F1o Andr=E9 Diamant. =A1Que en el a=F1o 2009 puedas cosechar todo =
lo
que sembraste durante el 2008! Nuestro C=EDrculo, un bolet=EDn semanal de
ajedrez editado en Argentina en lenguaje espa=F1ol.

There is a review by Rick Kennedy: (12/28) Review: Winning with the
Krazy Kat and Old Hippo, by Gary K. Gifford, Davide Rozzoni and Bill
Wall (Lulu Press, 2008), reviewed by Rick Kennedy. "Gifford, Rozzoni
and Wall have created quite a t =96 to Hippo players and to explorers
of the unorthodox equally. Club players who have wanted to add that
=93push your pawns defense=94 to their repertoire (isn=92t it annoying when
the local Expert does that to you?) but who would like a pathway
through the swamp of variations can rejoice with this resource: the
Kat ain=92t Krazy after all, and the Hippo ain=92t near being old=85"

Ray Keene publishes a new book about a fascinating game: (12/28) 2008
World Championship Game Three - Kramnik vs Anand: GM Raymond Keene
(Keene On Chess) looks deeply into the "surreal" game three from this
year's World Chess Championship match, played out in Bonn, Germany, in
October 2008. Keene also discusses the ideal number of games for such
a match, and discusses the reasons behind Anand's victory.

(12/29) Review: Zuke 'Em - the Colle-Zukertort Revolutionized by
David Rudel, reviewed by NM Bill McGeary. "The basic sequence for the
Zukertort is 1.d4 2.Nf3, 3.e3, 4.b3, creating the impression of a
smart compact formation. It would seem that such a simple approach
would hardly need many pages to describe, but players of this opening
know it isn't nearly that simple. Author David Rudel takes his turn
at tackling the problems that occur in playing this opening for
White..."

A collection of MAMS articles by Chessville's Belgian researcher
Albert Albert's also contains reviews of his first book by two writers
here at chess.misc His new title is also out for review - Chessville
has arranged grandmaster attention to it, and in 3 continents.

Ray Keene has yet another new book out on Anand Kramnik: In his
Chessville column her writes: Comparing the champion's moves with
those of the best computer programs, such as RYBKA and FRITZ , it
became clear that Anand's rate of confluence with the unerring silicon
brains was unprecedentedly high. As I followed every game, observing
the computer predictions as we went along, which were, of course,
forbidden fruit for the protagonists while at the board, almost every
move in the first half of the match made by Anand duplicated best
practice, as adumbrated by the thinking machines themselves."

Our doughty news editor from Madrid Pablo Sierra covers 5 current
major tournaments.

Graham Clayton writes an anecdote about Alekhine I never heard before:
What Might Have Been: In October 1932 Alexander Alekhine advised the
Australian Chess Federation that he was touring the Far East, giving
simultaneous exhibitions in cities such as Tokyo, Shanghai, Hong Kong,
Singapore, and Djakarta in the first half of 1934. If 500 pounds
could be guaranteed, he would come to Australia to give ten
simultaneous exhibitions and a blindfold exhibition. The ACF declined
the offer. Alekhine again wrote to the ACF in February 1933 with a
better offer. He would give 20 simultaneous exhibitions over a period
of 6 weeks for 200 pounds plus expenses. Alekhine stated in an
interview on Dutch radio in April 1934 that he would tour Australia
later that year, and play in the Melbourne Centenary Tournament. The
ACF attempted to work out conditions, but nothing came of Alekhine's
offer.

What Might Have Been, Part Two: Icelandic GM Johnann Hjartarson cut
short his honeymoon to play in the 1988 Tilburg GM tournament.

(12/23) Training: Recon64. A new Move Prediction Exercise from Jim
Mitch (aka Professor Chester Nuhmentz.) Known as Rubenstein's
Immortal, the game chosen for the December 2008 Move Prediction
exercise features one of the most beautiful combinations of all time.
Even if you won't be working through the exercise, treat yourself to
viewing the game starting with Black's 22nd move. The sequence that
develops from there is stunning, and a real challenge to find for this
exercise...

For Philidor fans: (12/21) Free eBook: A Selection of Games At
Chess, Actually Played by Philidor and His Contemporaries. Now First
Published from the Original Manuscripts with Notes and Additions by
George Walker, (English chess master and writer, born March 1803 =96
died April 1879). Published at London in 1835 by Sherwood, Gilbert &
Piper, it includes an Appendix: On the Pawn and Three Moves, and The
Game of the Pawns. This Public Domain eBook is presented as a zipped
PDF file; find it and many others on our always-free Downloadable
eBooks page.

main site: www.chessville.com

While you are there check out articles from our regular columnists for
the past month:

GM Nigel Davis
IM Igor Khmelnitsky
ICCF IM Keith Hayward
NM Peter Wong
FM Amatzia Avni
The Fabulous JanXena, darlings!
Clyde Nakamura
Bill Wall
Bob Long

I may have missed a few.

Chessville is a free chess site with optionally subscribed weekly news
letter.

Phil Innes
Business Manager
Chessville





 
Date: 31 Dec 2008 20:47:38
From: help bot
Subject: Re: Number 1 US Chess Magazine had good year
On Dec 31, 10:41=A0am, onech...@comcast.net wrote:

> Chessville had another great year, despite being down for 8 weeks
> because of floods and other disasters. Even so, it continues to surge
> ahead as #1 US based chess magazine


Who ranks the chess magazines based on
nationality, like this?

I always considered Chess Life to be the number
one in terms of circulation (just guessing here), but
in terms of /quality/, other magazines seemed to
out-class CL by a country mile. At one time, I
read Inside Chess by Yasser Seirawan and John
Donaldson, but there was too much focus on
openings-theory battles at the highest levels, in
openings I did not even play. I really liked the
few issues I saw of Jan Timman's magazine, but
by golly I just could not justify subscribing, as I
then made less than a hundred grand per year
from chess.

As far as the internet goes, I would not want
the job of accounting for all the multitude of
sites pertaining to chess, let alone trying to
rank them in any way. In fact, the way in
which Dr. IMnes has stated his sweeping
claim is so vague as to defy any attempt at
refutation. For all we know, he may have
ranked chessville.com #1 in horseshoe
tossing, or in crochet... .

Anyway, I am surprised to learn that the
great flood has somehow affected the Web
site. In most parts of the world, the waters
reportedly receeded thousands of years ago,
with the sole surviving ship making safe
landing at Mount Ararat. How they missed
the much higher summits of the Himalayas
is a mystery to this very day; but the
important thing is that all the dinosaurs and
other creatures were safe.


-- help bot



 
Date: 31 Dec 2008 18:06:24
From: raylopez99
Subject: Re: Number 1 US Chess Magazine had good year
On Dec 31, 10:41=A0am, onech...@comcast.net wrote:

Looks good. I'll bookmark it. I like the idiosyncric look of it--
nice touch, like a hidden gem.

RL