Main
Date: 29 Jan 2008 12:38:27
From: J.D. Walker
Subject: Planning the Defense
PLANNING THE DEFENSE


Benjamin Franklin wrote in "The Morals of Chess" (1750):

"The Game of Chess is not merely an idle amusement; several very
valuable qualities of the mind, useful in the course of human life, are
to be acquired and strengthened by it, so as to become habits ready on
all occasions; for life is a kind of Chess, in which we have often
points to gain, and competitors or adversaries to contend with, and in
which there is a vast variety of good and ill events, that are, in some
degree, the effect of prudence, or the want of it. By playing at Chess
then, we may learn:

1st, Foresight, which looks a little into futurity, and considers
the consequences that may attend an action ...

2nd, Circumspection, which surveys the whole Chess-board, or scene
of action: - the relation of the several Pieces, and their situations; ...

3rd, Caution, not to make our moves too hastily...."

To these attributes we might add Calculation, Strategic Planning,
Tactical Operations and perhaps others.

This all sounds pretty good for an aspiring chess player. Not only will
they have some fun but they will improve their minds as well. Yet, this
rosy view is open to criticism.

Will chess players actually use these improved mental faculties in the
real world, or are they only relevant in the world of sixty-four
squares. Some players do seem to go overboard with chess obsession.
One need only consider the life of Bobby Fischer for a case in point.

Without doubt, we live in a rapidly changing world. One good test of
our chess-acquired mental talents would be to properly analyze a limited
but complicated real world situation and make a proper plan of action.
Let us consider the following hypothetical scenario that is similar to
what many chess players may encounter at one time or another.

Here are some assumptions for our scenario:

1) We have a dedicated chess player of growing strength and optimistic
outlook.

2) She works as nurse in a local doctor's clinic and has saved up a fair
amount of mad money, and vacation time with the express purpose of
attending a large chess tournament.

3) There may be as many as a thousand players at this tournament from
around the world.

4) The tournament will be held in a large convention center frequented
by many guests, and serviced by a large staff.

5) There will be plenty of local media coverage, and many visitors
dropping by to watch.

6) The convention center is located in a dense modern urban setting.

7) The tournament goes on for almost two weeks, with attendant festivities.

8) Let us call our hypothetical player "Irina."

9) Over the past year Irina has spent many hours of many days studying
the games of her potential high level opponents and has plans for each
of them.

10) Irina lives in a remote part of the country that is thinly populated.

11) She has been informed that at this tournament they will be enforcing
the FIDE handshake rule.


GOAL: Irina wants to have the best result possible at the tournament.
After all, she has planned, studied, and saved up for a year for this event.

ANALYZE THIS! Irina has prepared for the trip and the event in many
ways, but she is left with one nagging question. What provisions should
she make regarding health risks?

She begins to think through the problem trying to recollect all the
relevant facts. As a health professional she knows that since she comes
from a thinly populated area that her immune system may not have faced
as many tests as those of people from densely populated areas. She also
is well aware that even a simple cold could ruin as many four or five of
her games in a row. She also considers, that as a world-wide gathering
place, the tournament provides an excellent opportunity for new versions
of old germs, or completely new diseases to make an appearance. With
all of the people and foot traffic at the tournament it is quite likely
that a number of incidents will occur where people suddenly and
uncontrollably sneeze -- spraying large clouds of infectious matter into
the air. This in turn means that one or more cases of "a cold going
around" are likely to occur at the tournament.

She knows that a cold is not the only threat, but it along with
influenza are probably the most likely threats. Still, any caution
expended to prevent a cold or the flu will also help to prevent less
frequent but more serious diseases. She also reflects that people do
have varying habits of personal cleanliness -- a fact that has been
reinforced by her years of working as a nurse.

She also knows that the most likely routes for the transmission of
disease at her tournament are the hands, the mouth, the nose, and the eyes.

Alrightee now, that is the start of this problem situation. I challenge
you to solve it for Irina. Protect her health so that she can have a
great performance and a memorable vacation! What are your thoughts and
what will your plan be?
--

Cordially,
Rev. J.D. Walker, MsD, U.C.




 
Date: 29 Jan 2008 15:48:52
From: raven1
Subject: Re: Planning the Defense
On Tue, 29 Jan 2008 12:38:27 -0800, "J.D. Walker"
<j.d.walker@comcast.net > wrote:

>PLANNING THE DEFENSE
>
>
>Benjamin Franklin wrote in "The Morals of Chess" (1750):
>
> "The Game of Chess is not merely an idle amusement; several very
>valuable qualities of the mind, useful in the course of human life, are
>to be acquired and strengthened by it, so as to become habits ready on
>all occasions; for life is a kind of Chess, in which we have often
>points to gain, and competitors or adversaries to contend with, and in
>which there is a vast variety of good and ill events, that are, in some
>degree, the effect of prudence, or the want of it. By playing at Chess
>then, we may learn:
>
> 1st, Foresight, which looks a little into futurity, and considers
>the consequences that may attend an action ...
>
> 2nd, Circumspection, which surveys the whole Chess-board, or scene
>of action: - the relation of the several Pieces, and their situations; ...
>
> 3rd, Caution, not to make our moves too hastily...."
>
>To these attributes we might add Calculation, Strategic Planning,
>Tactical Operations and perhaps others.
>
>This all sounds pretty good for an aspiring chess player. Not only will
>they have some fun but they will improve their minds as well. Yet, this
>rosy view is open to criticism.
>
>Will chess players actually use these improved mental faculties in the
>real world, or are they only relevant in the world of sixty-four
>squares. Some players do seem to go overboard with chess obsession.
>One need only consider the life of Bobby Fischer for a case in point.
>
>Without doubt, we live in a rapidly changing world. One good test of
>our chess-acquired mental talents would be to properly analyze a limited
>but complicated real world situation and make a proper plan of action.
>Let us consider the following hypothetical scenario that is similar to
>what many chess players may encounter at one time or another.
>
>Here are some assumptions for our scenario:
>
>1) We have a dedicated chess player of growing strength and optimistic
>outlook.
>
>2) She works as nurse in a local doctor's clinic and has saved up a fair
>amount of mad money, and vacation time with the express purpose of
>attending a large chess tournament.
>
>3) There may be as many as a thousand players at this tournament from
>around the world.
>
>4) The tournament will be held in a large convention center frequented
>by many guests, and serviced by a large staff.
>
>5) There will be plenty of local media coverage, and many visitors
>dropping by to watch.
>
>6) The convention center is located in a dense modern urban setting.
>
>7) The tournament goes on for almost two weeks, with attendant festivities.
>
>8) Let us call our hypothetical player "Irina."
>
>9) Over the past year Irina has spent many hours of many days studying
>the games of her potential high level opponents and has plans for each
>of them.
>
>10) Irina lives in a remote part of the country that is thinly populated.
>
>11) She has been informed that at this tournament they will be enforcing
>the FIDE handshake rule.
>
>
>GOAL: Irina wants to have the best result possible at the tournament.
>After all, she has planned, studied, and saved up for a year for this event.
>
>ANALYZE THIS! Irina has prepared for the trip and the event in many
>ways, but she is left with one nagging question. What provisions should
>she make regarding health risks?
>
>She begins to think through the problem trying to recollect all the
>relevant facts. As a health professional she knows that since she comes
>from a thinly populated area that her immune system may not have faced
>as many tests as those of people from densely populated areas. She also
>is well aware that even a simple cold could ruin as many four or five of
>her games in a row. She also considers, that as a world-wide gathering
>place, the tournament provides an excellent opportunity for new versions
>of old germs, or completely new diseases to make an appearance. With
>all of the people and foot traffic at the tournament it is quite likely
>that a number of incidents will occur where people suddenly and
>uncontrollably sneeze -- spraying large clouds of infectious matter into
>the air. This in turn means that one or more cases of "a cold going
>around" are likely to occur at the tournament.
>
>She knows that a cold is not the only threat, but it along with
>influenza are probably the most likely threats. Still, any caution
>expended to prevent a cold or the flu will also help to prevent less
>frequent but more serious diseases. She also reflects that people do
>have varying habits of personal cleanliness -- a fact that has been
>reinforced by her years of working as a nurse.
>
>She also knows that the most likely routes for the transmission of
>disease at her tournament are the hands, the mouth, the nose, and the eyes.
>
>Alrightee now, that is the start of this problem situation. I challenge
>you to solve it for Irina. Protect her health so that she can have a
>great performance and a memorable vacation! What are your thoughts and
>what will your plan be?

An adequate supply of surgical gloves, to be discarded after each
handshake, would be a good start. A surgical mask and goggles would be
an additional help. Or, she could just recognize that her opponents
face exactly the same potential handicap, and play the game, already.
---

"Faith may not move mountains, but you should see what it does to skyscrapers..."


  
Date: 29 Jan 2008 12:52:24
From: J.D. Walker
Subject: Re: Planning the Defense
raven1 wrote:
> On Tue, 29 Jan 2008 12:38:27 -0800, "J.D. Walker"
> <j.d.walker@comcast.net> wrote:
>
>> PLANNING THE DEFENSE
>>
>>
>> Benjamin Franklin wrote in "The Morals of Chess" (1750):
>>
>> "The Game of Chess is not merely an idle amusement; several very
>> valuable qualities of the mind, useful in the course of human life, are
>> to be acquired and strengthened by it, so as to become habits ready on
>> all occasions; for life is a kind of Chess, in which we have often
>> points to gain, and competitors or adversaries to contend with, and in
>> which there is a vast variety of good and ill events, that are, in some
>> degree, the effect of prudence, or the want of it. By playing at Chess
>> then, we may learn:
>>
>> 1st, Foresight, which looks a little into futurity, and considers
>> the consequences that may attend an action ...
>>
>> 2nd, Circumspection, which surveys the whole Chess-board, or scene
>> of action: - the relation of the several Pieces, and their situations; ...
>>
>> 3rd, Caution, not to make our moves too hastily...."
>>
>> To these attributes we might add Calculation, Strategic Planning,
>> Tactical Operations and perhaps others.
>>
>> This all sounds pretty good for an aspiring chess player. Not only will
>> they have some fun but they will improve their minds as well. Yet, this
>> rosy view is open to criticism.
>>
>> Will chess players actually use these improved mental faculties in the
>> real world, or are they only relevant in the world of sixty-four
>> squares. Some players do seem to go overboard with chess obsession.
>> One need only consider the life of Bobby Fischer for a case in point.
>>
>> Without doubt, we live in a rapidly changing world. One good test of
>> our chess-acquired mental talents would be to properly analyze a limited
>> but complicated real world situation and make a proper plan of action.
>> Let us consider the following hypothetical scenario that is similar to
>> what many chess players may encounter at one time or another.
>>
>> Here are some assumptions for our scenario:
>>
>> 1) We have a dedicated chess player of growing strength and optimistic
>> outlook.
>>
>> 2) She works as nurse in a local doctor's clinic and has saved up a fair
>> amount of mad money, and vacation time with the express purpose of
>> attending a large chess tournament.
>>
>> 3) There may be as many as a thousand players at this tournament from
>> around the world.
>>
>> 4) The tournament will be held in a large convention center frequented
>> by many guests, and serviced by a large staff.
>>
>> 5) There will be plenty of local media coverage, and many visitors
>> dropping by to watch.
>>
>> 6) The convention center is located in a dense modern urban setting.
>>
>> 7) The tournament goes on for almost two weeks, with attendant festivities.
>>
>> 8) Let us call our hypothetical player "Irina."
>>
>> 9) Over the past year Irina has spent many hours of many days studying
>> the games of her potential high level opponents and has plans for each
>> of them.
>>
>> 10) Irina lives in a remote part of the country that is thinly populated.
>>
>> 11) She has been informed that at this tournament they will be enforcing
>> the FIDE handshake rule.
>>
>>
>> GOAL: Irina wants to have the best result possible at the tournament.
>> After all, she has planned, studied, and saved up for a year for this event.
>>
>> ANALYZE THIS! Irina has prepared for the trip and the event in many
>> ways, but she is left with one nagging question. What provisions should
>> she make regarding health risks?
>>
>> She begins to think through the problem trying to recollect all the
>> relevant facts. As a health professional she knows that since she comes
>>from a thinly populated area that her immune system may not have faced
>> as many tests as those of people from densely populated areas. She also
>> is well aware that even a simple cold could ruin as many four or five of
>> her games in a row. She also considers, that as a world-wide gathering
>> place, the tournament provides an excellent opportunity for new versions
>> of old germs, or completely new diseases to make an appearance. With
>> all of the people and foot traffic at the tournament it is quite likely
>> that a number of incidents will occur where people suddenly and
>> uncontrollably sneeze -- spraying large clouds of infectious matter into
>> the air. This in turn means that one or more cases of "a cold going
>> around" are likely to occur at the tournament.
>>
>> She knows that a cold is not the only threat, but it along with
>> influenza are probably the most likely threats. Still, any caution
>> expended to prevent a cold or the flu will also help to prevent less
>> frequent but more serious diseases. She also reflects that people do
>> have varying habits of personal cleanliness -- a fact that has been
>> reinforced by her years of working as a nurse.
>>
>> She also knows that the most likely routes for the transmission of
>> disease at her tournament are the hands, the mouth, the nose, and the eyes.
>>
>> Alrightee now, that is the start of this problem situation. I challenge
>> you to solve it for Irina. Protect her health so that she can have a
>> great performance and a memorable vacation! What are your thoughts and
>> what will your plan be?
>
> An adequate supply of surgical gloves, to be discarded after each
> handshake, would be a good start. A surgical mask and goggles would be
> an additional help. Or, she could just recognize that her opponents
> face exactly the same potential handicap, and play the game, already.
> ---
>
> "Faith may not move mountains, but you should see what it does to skyscrapers..."

The second part of your answer abandons logic and Irina's goal of having
the best result possible. Shared mediocrity is not a road to success.
At least not in this problem. :)
--

Cordially,
Rev. J.D. Walker, MsD, U.C.


   
Date: 29 Jan 2008 16:06:15
From: raven1
Subject: Re: Planning the Defense
On Tue, 29 Jan 2008 12:52:24 -0800, "J.D. Walker"
<j.d.walker@comcast.net > wrote:

>raven1 wrote:
>> On Tue, 29 Jan 2008 12:38:27 -0800, "J.D. Walker"
>> <j.d.walker@comcast.net> wrote:
>>
>>> PLANNING THE DEFENSE
>>>
>>>
>>> Benjamin Franklin wrote in "The Morals of Chess" (1750):
>>>
>>> "The Game of Chess is not merely an idle amusement; several very
>>> valuable qualities of the mind, useful in the course of human life, are
>>> to be acquired and strengthened by it, so as to become habits ready on
>>> all occasions; for life is a kind of Chess, in which we have often
>>> points to gain, and competitors or adversaries to contend with, and in
>>> which there is a vast variety of good and ill events, that are, in some
>>> degree, the effect of prudence, or the want of it. By playing at Chess
>>> then, we may learn:
>>>
>>> 1st, Foresight, which looks a little into futurity, and considers
>>> the consequences that may attend an action ...
>>>
>>> 2nd, Circumspection, which surveys the whole Chess-board, or scene
>>> of action: - the relation of the several Pieces, and their situations; ...
>>>
>>> 3rd, Caution, not to make our moves too hastily...."
>>>
>>> To these attributes we might add Calculation, Strategic Planning,
>>> Tactical Operations and perhaps others.
>>>
>>> This all sounds pretty good for an aspiring chess player. Not only will
>>> they have some fun but they will improve their minds as well. Yet, this
>>> rosy view is open to criticism.
>>>
>>> Will chess players actually use these improved mental faculties in the
>>> real world, or are they only relevant in the world of sixty-four
>>> squares. Some players do seem to go overboard with chess obsession.
>>> One need only consider the life of Bobby Fischer for a case in point.
>>>
>>> Without doubt, we live in a rapidly changing world. One good test of
>>> our chess-acquired mental talents would be to properly analyze a limited
>>> but complicated real world situation and make a proper plan of action.
>>> Let us consider the following hypothetical scenario that is similar to
>>> what many chess players may encounter at one time or another.
>>>
>>> Here are some assumptions for our scenario:
>>>
>>> 1) We have a dedicated chess player of growing strength and optimistic
>>> outlook.
>>>
>>> 2) She works as nurse in a local doctor's clinic and has saved up a fair
>>> amount of mad money, and vacation time with the express purpose of
>>> attending a large chess tournament.
>>>
>>> 3) There may be as many as a thousand players at this tournament from
>>> around the world.
>>>
>>> 4) The tournament will be held in a large convention center frequented
>>> by many guests, and serviced by a large staff.
>>>
>>> 5) There will be plenty of local media coverage, and many visitors
>>> dropping by to watch.
>>>
>>> 6) The convention center is located in a dense modern urban setting.
>>>
>>> 7) The tournament goes on for almost two weeks, with attendant festivities.
>>>
>>> 8) Let us call our hypothetical player "Irina."
>>>
>>> 9) Over the past year Irina has spent many hours of many days studying
>>> the games of her potential high level opponents and has plans for each
>>> of them.
>>>
>>> 10) Irina lives in a remote part of the country that is thinly populated.
>>>
>>> 11) She has been informed that at this tournament they will be enforcing
>>> the FIDE handshake rule.
>>>
>>>
>>> GOAL: Irina wants to have the best result possible at the tournament.
>>> After all, she has planned, studied, and saved up for a year for this event.
>>>
>>> ANALYZE THIS! Irina has prepared for the trip and the event in many
>>> ways, but she is left with one nagging question. What provisions should
>>> she make regarding health risks?
>>>
>>> She begins to think through the problem trying to recollect all the
>>> relevant facts. As a health professional she knows that since she comes
>>>from a thinly populated area that her immune system may not have faced
>>> as many tests as those of people from densely populated areas. She also
>>> is well aware that even a simple cold could ruin as many four or five of
>>> her games in a row. She also considers, that as a world-wide gathering
>>> place, the tournament provides an excellent opportunity for new versions
>>> of old germs, or completely new diseases to make an appearance. With
>>> all of the people and foot traffic at the tournament it is quite likely
>>> that a number of incidents will occur where people suddenly and
>>> uncontrollably sneeze -- spraying large clouds of infectious matter into
>>> the air. This in turn means that one or more cases of "a cold going
>>> around" are likely to occur at the tournament.
>>>
>>> She knows that a cold is not the only threat, but it along with
>>> influenza are probably the most likely threats. Still, any caution
>>> expended to prevent a cold or the flu will also help to prevent less
>>> frequent but more serious diseases. She also reflects that people do
>>> have varying habits of personal cleanliness -- a fact that has been
>>> reinforced by her years of working as a nurse.
>>>
>>> She also knows that the most likely routes for the transmission of
>>> disease at her tournament are the hands, the mouth, the nose, and the eyes.
>>>
>>> Alrightee now, that is the start of this problem situation. I challenge
>>> you to solve it for Irina. Protect her health so that she can have a
>>> great performance and a memorable vacation! What are your thoughts and
>>> what will your plan be?
>>
>> An adequate supply of surgical gloves, to be discarded after each
>> handshake, would be a good start. A surgical mask and goggles would be
>> an additional help. Or, she could just recognize that her opponents
>> face exactly the same potential handicap, and play the game, already.

>
>The second part of your answer abandons logic and Irina's goal of having
>the best result possible. Shared mediocrity is not a road to success.
>At least not in this problem. :)

Surgical gloves, mask, and goggles then. Along with an alcohol-based
hand sanitizer. She might also petition the referees to enforce the
guidelines from the Bible's book of Leviticus regarding communicable
diseases, and insist that any visibly sick competitor be asked to
remove themselves to the sidelines, and ring a bell, while shouting
"unclean, unclean!" to warn others away.
---

"Faith may not move mountains, but you should see what it does to skyscrapers..."


    
Date: 29 Jan 2008 13:37:14
From: J.D. Walker
Subject: Re: Planning the Defense
raven1 wrote:
> On Tue, 29 Jan 2008 12:52:24 -0800, "J.D. Walker"
> <j.d.walker@comcast.net> wrote:
>
>> raven1 wrote:
>>> On Tue, 29 Jan 2008 12:38:27 -0800, "J.D. Walker"
>>> <j.d.walker@comcast.net> wrote:
>>>
>>>> PLANNING THE DEFENSE
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Benjamin Franklin wrote in "The Morals of Chess" (1750):
>>>>
>>>> "The Game of Chess is not merely an idle amusement; several very
>>>> valuable qualities of the mind, useful in the course of human life, are
>>>> to be acquired and strengthened by it, so as to become habits ready on
>>>> all occasions; for life is a kind of Chess, in which we have often
>>>> points to gain, and competitors or adversaries to contend with, and in
>>>> which there is a vast variety of good and ill events, that are, in some
>>>> degree, the effect of prudence, or the want of it. By playing at Chess
>>>> then, we may learn:
>>>>
>>>> 1st, Foresight, which looks a little into futurity, and considers
>>>> the consequences that may attend an action ...
>>>>
>>>> 2nd, Circumspection, which surveys the whole Chess-board, or scene
>>>> of action: - the relation of the several Pieces, and their situations; ...
>>>>
>>>> 3rd, Caution, not to make our moves too hastily...."
>>>>
>>>> To these attributes we might add Calculation, Strategic Planning,
>>>> Tactical Operations and perhaps others.
>>>>
>>>> This all sounds pretty good for an aspiring chess player. Not only will
>>>> they have some fun but they will improve their minds as well. Yet, this
>>>> rosy view is open to criticism.
>>>>
>>>> Will chess players actually use these improved mental faculties in the
>>>> real world, or are they only relevant in the world of sixty-four
>>>> squares. Some players do seem to go overboard with chess obsession.
>>>> One need only consider the life of Bobby Fischer for a case in point.
>>>>
>>>> Without doubt, we live in a rapidly changing world. One good test of
>>>> our chess-acquired mental talents would be to properly analyze a limited
>>>> but complicated real world situation and make a proper plan of action.
>>>> Let us consider the following hypothetical scenario that is similar to
>>>> what many chess players may encounter at one time or another.
>>>>
>>>> Here are some assumptions for our scenario:
>>>>
>>>> 1) We have a dedicated chess player of growing strength and optimistic
>>>> outlook.
>>>>
>>>> 2) She works as nurse in a local doctor's clinic and has saved up a fair
>>>> amount of mad money, and vacation time with the express purpose of
>>>> attending a large chess tournament.
>>>>
>>>> 3) There may be as many as a thousand players at this tournament from
>>>> around the world.
>>>>
>>>> 4) The tournament will be held in a large convention center frequented
>>>> by many guests, and serviced by a large staff.
>>>>
>>>> 5) There will be plenty of local media coverage, and many visitors
>>>> dropping by to watch.
>>>>
>>>> 6) The convention center is located in a dense modern urban setting.
>>>>
>>>> 7) The tournament goes on for almost two weeks, with attendant festivities.
>>>>
>>>> 8) Let us call our hypothetical player "Irina."
>>>>
>>>> 9) Over the past year Irina has spent many hours of many days studying
>>>> the games of her potential high level opponents and has plans for each
>>>> of them.
>>>>
>>>> 10) Irina lives in a remote part of the country that is thinly populated.
>>>>
>>>> 11) She has been informed that at this tournament they will be enforcing
>>>> the FIDE handshake rule.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> GOAL: Irina wants to have the best result possible at the tournament.
>>>> After all, she has planned, studied, and saved up for a year for this event.
>>>>
>>>> ANALYZE THIS! Irina has prepared for the trip and the event in many
>>>> ways, but she is left with one nagging question. What provisions should
>>>> she make regarding health risks?
>>>>
>>>> She begins to think through the problem trying to recollect all the
>>>> relevant facts. As a health professional she knows that since she comes
>>> >from a thinly populated area that her immune system may not have faced
>>>> as many tests as those of people from densely populated areas. She also
>>>> is well aware that even a simple cold could ruin as many four or five of
>>>> her games in a row. She also considers, that as a world-wide gathering
>>>> place, the tournament provides an excellent opportunity for new versions
>>>> of old germs, or completely new diseases to make an appearance. With
>>>> all of the people and foot traffic at the tournament it is quite likely
>>>> that a number of incidents will occur where people suddenly and
>>>> uncontrollably sneeze -- spraying large clouds of infectious matter into
>>>> the air. This in turn means that one or more cases of "a cold going
>>>> around" are likely to occur at the tournament.
>>>>
>>>> She knows that a cold is not the only threat, but it along with
>>>> influenza are probably the most likely threats. Still, any caution
>>>> expended to prevent a cold or the flu will also help to prevent less
>>>> frequent but more serious diseases. She also reflects that people do
>>>> have varying habits of personal cleanliness -- a fact that has been
>>>> reinforced by her years of working as a nurse.
>>>>
>>>> She also knows that the most likely routes for the transmission of
>>>> disease at her tournament are the hands, the mouth, the nose, and the eyes.
>>>>
>>>> Alrightee now, that is the start of this problem situation. I challenge
>>>> you to solve it for Irina. Protect her health so that she can have a
>>>> great performance and a memorable vacation! What are your thoughts and
>>>> what will your plan be?
>>> An adequate supply of surgical gloves, to be discarded after each
>>> handshake, would be a good start. A surgical mask and goggles would be
>>> an additional help. Or, she could just recognize that her opponents
>>> face exactly the same potential handicap, and play the game, already.
>
>> The second part of your answer abandons logic and Irina's goal of having
>> the best result possible. Shared mediocrity is not a road to success.
>> At least not in this problem. :)
>
> Surgical gloves, mask, and goggles then. Along with an alcohol-based
> hand sanitizer. She might also petition the referees to enforce the
> guidelines from the Bible's book of Leviticus regarding communicable
> diseases, and insist that any visibly sick competitor be asked to
> remove themselves to the sidelines, and ring a bell, while shouting
> "unclean, unclean!" to warn others away.

Well, those things would certainly help, and you scored some "funny"
points. :) I do think there are other things to think about for a
thorough plan.

I am curious though, what is the FIDE arbiter supposed to do if an
obviously seriously ill person insists on playing?
--

Cordially,
Rev. J.D. Walker, MsD, U.C.


     
Date: 30 Jan 2008 16:53:23
From: David Richerby
Subject: Re: Planning the Defense
J.D. Walker <j.d.walker@comcast.net > wrote:
> I am curious though, what is the FIDE arbiter supposed to do if an
> obviously seriously ill person insists on playing?

As always, whatever he thinks is best for the tournament.


Dave.

--
David Richerby Indelible Love Tree (TM): it's like a
www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~davidr/ tree that you can share with someone
special but it can't be erased!


      
Date: 30 Jan 2008 09:16:45
From: David Kane
Subject: Re: Planning the Defense

"David Richerby" <davidr@chiark.greenend.org.uk > wrote in message
news:pjy*GRc6r@news.chiark.greenend.org.uk...
> J.D. Walker <j.d.walker@comcast.net> wrote:
>> I am curious though, what is the FIDE arbiter supposed to do if an
>> obviously seriously ill person insists on playing?
>
> As always, whatever he thinks is best for the tournament.
>
>

Before you wrote with respect to toiletgate:
"If you're going to blame [arbiter] Gijssen, do you also blame the man who
turned
the key in the lock of the toilet? "

If arbiters are akin to prison janitors, why should they be thinking at all?