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Date: 27 May 2005 10:36:32
From: Jud McCranie
Subject: Tip the king in checkmate?


Does it make sense to tip the king over if he is checkmated? Is it
commonly done?

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Date: 27 May 2005 18:27:48
From: David Richerby
Subject: Re: Tip the king in checkmate?


Jud McCranie <youknowwhat.mccranie@adelphia.net > wrote:
> Does it make sense to tip the king over if he is checkmated? Is it
> commonly done?

Knocking over the king has no status in the rules of chess, except that,
if deliberate, the touch-move rule comes into play. It's commonly
accepted as a gesture of resignation but, since the game is over at the
point of checkmate, there's nothing to resign. It would seem strange to
knock over a checkmated king.


Dave.

--
David Richerby Surprise Book (TM): it's like a
www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~davidr/ romantic novel but not like you'd
expect!


  
Date: 27 May 2005 13:42:28
From: Jud McCranie
Subject: Re: Tip the king in checkmate?


On 27 May 2005 18:27:48 +0100 (BST), David Richerby
<davidr@chiark.greenend.org.uk > wrote:

>Knocking over the king has no status in the rules of chess, except that,
>if deliberate, the touch-move rule comes into play. It's commonly
>accepted as a gesture of resignation but, since the game is over at the
>point of checkmate, there's nothing to resign. It would seem strange to
>knock over a checkmated king.

I think so to. There's no point in resigning if your already
checkmated.

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Date: 27 May 2005 15:13:03
From: =?iso-8859-1?Q?Frisbee=AE?=
Subject: Re: Tip the king in checkmate?


Jud McCranie wrote:
> On 27 May 2005 18:27:48 +0100 (BST), David Richerby
> <davidr@chiark.greenend.org.uk> wrote:
>
>> Knocking over the king has no status in the rules of chess, except
>> that, if deliberate, the touch-move rule comes into play. It's
>> commonly accepted as a gesture of resignation but, since the game is
>> over at the point of checkmate, there's nothing to resign. It would
>> seem strange to knock over a checkmated king.
>
> I think so to. There's no point in resigning if your already
> checkmated.

It's not unlike stating "I quit!" immediately after being fired.



    
Date: 27 May 2005 15:28:55
From: Jud McCranie
Subject: Re: Tip the king in checkmate?


On Fri, 27 May 2005 15:13:03 -0400, FrisbeeŽ <discgolfdad@gEEmail.com >
wrote:

>It's not unlike stating "I quit!" immediately after being fired.

I agree.


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Date: 27 May 2005 11:17:35
From: Harold Buck
Subject: Re: Tip the king in checkmate?


It is customary to tip the king 15%, or 20% for exceptional service.
Your spouse may write a check if you don't have any cash.


--Harold Buck


"I used to rock and roll all night,
and party every day.
Then it was every other day. . . ."
-Homer J. Simpson


 
Date: 27 May 2005 09:07:02
From: Dan-the-K
Subject: Re: Tip the king in checkmate?


Does it make sense to tip the king over if he is checkmated? Is it
commonly done?

AFAIK, tipping the king means "I resign." It's used, I think, somewhat
prevalantly in such circumstances.

Please confirm or correct.

Dan



 
Date: 27 May 2005 07:43:21
From: Mark Houlsby
Subject: Re: Tip the king in checkmate?


No and no.



 
Date: 27 May 2005 12:33:14
From:
Subject: Re: Tip the king in checkmate?


In my OTB tournament games, I would lay my King down as a sign of
resignation. In fact, I was taught by my dad as a beginner that this
was proper chess ettiquette. I'm not sure where this practice
originated, but it may serve as a kind of "laying down arms in
surrender" gesture, a physical acknowledgment that you have been
defeated by your opponent in a fair battle. I have never had anyone
object to this practice, so I assume it is permissible.

In my experience, however, stopping the clocks (usually accompanied by
some statement such as "I resign" or "Nice game" or "You were so
busted, you lucky blankety blank") is the most common form of
resignation in OTB. I have also seen people who resign with their arms
(knocking the pieces off the table) and with their feet (people who
just leave and let their time run out), and even a few people who seem
to always play on to mate (at some point, these people were stalemated
by someone who had a K + Q against their K).

The funniest resignation I have ever seen was accompanied by a loud but
short statement which contained a profanity unsuitable for republishing
in a forum such as this one, frequented by large numbers of small
children.

I think this is quite an interesting topic, as resignations play a key
role in OTB chess and, occur at a time of psychic disturbance, and take
diverse forms. Perhaps a brief history of the etiquette of
resignations (and breaches thereof) might be an interesting topic for
one of the fine resident historians (Mr. Brennen or Mr. Kingston spring
to mind), as my desultory research on the Web reveals a rich body of
anecdotal evidence but no serious attempts at historical research.

Or perhaps one of the more philosphically-inclined frequenters of rgc
(say, Mr. Bourbaki), would consider penning a short "Prolegomena to Any
Future Resignations" as a guide to future inquiries into the
metaphysics of resignation.

In any event, my personal experience has been that most OTB players
resign with considerable dignity and grace, and the rare exceptions are
more amusing (and, for obvious reasons, forgivable) than anything else.

- Geof



  
Date: 27 May 2005 17:12:29
From: Jud McCranie
Subject: Re: Tip the king in checkmate?


On 27 May 2005 12:33:14 -0700, Equinorm@AOL.com wrote:

>The funniest resignation I have ever seen was accompanied by a loud but
>short statement which contained a profanity unsuitable for republishing
>in a forum such as this one, frequented by large numbers of small
>children.

The most unusual one I had, he tore the scoresheet in half and ran out
of the room. There were tears on the scoresheet. I was a kid and he
was an adult.

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