Main
Date: 27 Jan 2008 14:16:01
From:
Subject: Worst/Best Display of Sportsmanship at a Tournament by Opponent
The worst display was at a tournament in Atlanta where my opponent had
a lost position with 30 minutes on his clock. Instead of resigning, he
grabbed his coat and his hat, didn't look at me at all, and walked
away.

Now mind you, I've never had this happen to me before. I was 18 at the
time and confused as to what was going on. I got the tournament
director and after seeing what happened, he stopped the clock and gave
me the point.

Best Display: "Good game!" + handshake + objective post mortem = Best
display

Comments?




 
Date: 28 Jan 2008 10:00:32
From: Taylor Kingston
Subject: Re: Worst/Best Display of Sportsmanship at a Tournament by Opponent
On Jan 28, 12:44=A0pm, raven1 <quoththera...@nevermore.com > wrote:
> On Mon, 28 Jan 2008 09:24:36 -0800 (PST), Taylor Kingston
>
>
>
>
>
> <tkings...@chittenden.com> wrote:
> >On Jan 28, 10:55=A0am, raven1 <quoththera...@nevermore.com> wrote:
> >> On Sun, 27 Jan 2008 16:30:11 -0800 (PST), Taylor Kingston
>
> >> <tkings...@chittenden.com> wrote:
> >> >On Jan 27, 6:46=A0pm, raven1 <quoththera...@nevermore.com> wrote:
>
> >> >> "Faith may not move mountains, but you should see what it does to sk=
yscrapers..."
>
> >> > =A0That strikes me as being in very poor taste.
>
> >> Perhaps, but it's meant to make a point that unfortunately probably
> >> goes over the heads of the people it's directed at.
>
> > =A0Well, I guess I'm one of those. To me, it's like saying to Americans
> >circa 1942 something like "Pearl Harbor may be lousy for swimming, but
> >it's great place for torpedos!"
>
> It's an observation meant to point out to those Americans who want to
> see religion play a greater role in public life and politics that this
> may not always be a good idea. The 9/11 hijackers were no doubt
> shouting "Allah Akbar" as they crashed the planes into the buildings,
> anticipating their 72 virgins in Paradise.

Ah, now I see your point. Thanks for the clarification. By the way,
the 72 virgins thing didn't work out for them, as you can read here:

http://www.theonion.com/content/node/38673



 
Date: 28 Jan 2008 09:47:45
From: Larry Tapper
Subject: Re: B+N vs. K ending (was: Worst/Best Display of Sportsmanship at a
On Jan 28, 11:45=A0am, David Richerby <dav...@chiark.greenend.org.uk >
wrote:

> There are several methods. =A0`Deletang's triangles' seems to be the
> simplest to me but I'll admit I've never sat down and learnt this.
>
> Dave.

Deletang's triangles! A delightful bit of obscure chess jargon, new to
me.

While looking this up on the Web, I found a 1994 Melody Amber game in
which Judit Polgar had to execute this mate blindfolded. She finished
the job quite efficiently:

http://www.chessgames.com/perl/chessgame?gid=3D1092636

LT


 
Date: 28 Jan 2008 12:43:40
From: Hugh Brodie
Subject: Re: Worst/Best Display of Sportsmanship at a Tournament by Opponent
How about an IM being suddenly awakened from a drunken stupor minutes before
a round - and them deciding to piss all over a convenient chessboard? This
really happened in a tournament in Ottawa (Canada).

<briern@aol.com > wrote in message
news:051af4a6-59ed-4703-8657-1da9f034f1c9@d70g2000hsb.googlegroups.com...
> The worst display was at a tournament in Atlanta where my opponent had
> a lost position with 30 minutes on his clock. Instead of resigning, he
> grabbed his coat and his hat, didn't look at me at all, and walked
> away.
>
> Now mind you, I've never had this happen to me before. I was 18 at the
> time and confused as to what was going on. I got the tournament
> director and after seeing what happened, he stopped the clock and gave
> me the point.
>
> Best Display: "Good game!" + handshake + objective post mortem = Best
> display
>
> Comments?




 
Date: 28 Jan 2008 09:24:36
From: Taylor Kingston
Subject: Re: Worst/Best Display of Sportsmanship at a Tournament by Opponent
On Jan 28, 10:55=A0am, raven1 <quoththera...@nevermore.com > wrote:
> On Sun, 27 Jan 2008 16:30:11 -0800 (PST), Taylor Kingston
>
> <tkings...@chittenden.com> wrote:
> >On Jan 27, 6:46=A0pm, raven1 <quoththera...@nevermore.com> wrote:
>
> >> "Faith may not move mountains, but you should see what it does to skysc=
rapers..."
>
> > =A0That strikes me as being in very poor taste.
>
> Perhaps, but it's meant to make a point that unfortunately probably
> goes over the heads of the people it's directed at.

Well, I guess I'm one of those. To me, it's like saying to Americans
circa 1942 something like "Pearl Harbor may be lousy for swimming, but
it's great place for torpedos!"


  
Date: 28 Jan 2008 12:44:33
From: raven1
Subject: Re: Worst/Best Display of Sportsmanship at a Tournament by Opponent
On Mon, 28 Jan 2008 09:24:36 -0800 (PST), Taylor Kingston
<tkingston@chittenden.com > wrote:

>On Jan 28, 10:55 am, raven1 <quoththera...@nevermore.com> wrote:
>> On Sun, 27 Jan 2008 16:30:11 -0800 (PST), Taylor Kingston
>>
>> <tkings...@chittenden.com> wrote:
>> >On Jan 27, 6:46 pm, raven1 <quoththera...@nevermore.com> wrote:
>>
>> >> "Faith may not move mountains, but you should see what it does to skyscrapers..."
>>
>> >  That strikes me as being in very poor taste.
>>
>> Perhaps, but it's meant to make a point that unfortunately probably
>> goes over the heads of the people it's directed at.
>
> Well, I guess I'm one of those. To me, it's like saying to Americans
>circa 1942 something like "Pearl Harbor may be lousy for swimming, but
>it's great place for torpedos!"

It's an observation meant to point out to those Americans who want to
see religion play a greater role in public life and politics that this
may not always be a good idea. The 9/11 hijackers were no doubt
shouting "Allah Akbar" as they crashed the planes into the buildings,
anticipating their 72 virgins in Paradise.

It is, however, inappropriate in a chess NG, as I have no desire to
provoke either a religious or political flame war, so I won't use it
here in the future.
--

"O Sybilli, si ergo
Fortibus es in ero
O Nobili! Themis trux
Sivat sinem? Causen Dux"


 
Date: 28 Jan 2008 07:21:40
From: Taylor Kingston
Subject: B+N vs. K ending (was: Worst/Best Display of Sportsmanship at a
On Jan 28, 9:49=A0am, "Chess One" <OneCh...@comcast.net > wrote:
> "Larry Tapper" <larry_tap...@yahoo.com> wrote in message
>
>
> In the New York Open about 25 years ago, I got a position with bishop
> and knight vs. lone king against a 2300 player I won't name. First he
> tried to convince me that this was a theoretical draw; then he
> disappeared with his clock still ticking, an hour away from a time
> forfeit.
>
> And who, computer or human opponent, is going to do better in this scenari=
o?
> Since the position, and hence any known technique, is rare, I would say
> chances for draw are quire reasonable.

Many instructional books have described the method for mating with B
+N. A few from my library:

"Basic Chess Endings" by Reuben Fine, pp. 4-5
"Dvoretsky's Endgame Manual" (2nd edition) by k Dvoretsky, p. 279
"How I Became a Grandmaster at Age 14" by Alexandra Kosteniuk, pp.
86-90. This discussion, based on a Russian book by Zhuravlev, is the
clearest and best I have seen on the B+N ending. Kosteniuk's father
would drill her by setting up a random position on the board, and
giving her one minute to checkmate him. She says that by the time she
was a second-category player (about 1800 Elo, I think) she could
accomplish this consistently. Rev. Walker apparently has found this
drill useful too.

Personally, I've never had the position in any of my games, and have
seen it only once in rated play, in a club tournament in Cincinnati.
The closest I came was an ending I was winning handily, when my
opponent suddenly realized he could sacrifice down to a position where
all I had left was two knights. Unfortunately for him, he still had
one pawn left, which made a win for me theoretically possible. I
didn't mate him, but he did lose on time.


  
Date: 28 Jan 2008 12:59:33
From: Chess One
Subject: Re: B+N vs. K ending (was: Worst/Best Display of Sportsmanship at a Tournament by Opponent)

"Taylor Kingston" <tkingston@chittenden.com > wrote in message
news:77e27651-250f-4fda-9568-1c30c454a143@q77g2000hsh.googlegroups.com...
On Jan 28, 9:49 am, "Chess One" <OneCh...@comcast.net > wrote:
> "Larry Tapper" <larry_tap...@yahoo.com> wrote in message
>
>
> In the New York Open about 25 years ago, I got a position with bishop
> and knight vs. lone king against a 2300 player I won't name. First he
> tried to convince me that this was a theoretical draw; then he
> disappeared with his clock still ticking, an hour away from a time
> forfeit.
>
> And who, computer or human opponent, is going to do better in this
> scenario?
> Since the position, and hence any known technique, is rare, I would say
> chances for draw are quire reasonable.

Many instructional books have described the method for mating with B
+N. A few from my library:

"Basic Chess Endings" by Reuben Fine, pp. 4-5
"Dvoretsky's Endgame Manual" (2nd edition) by k Dvoretsky, p. 279
"How I Became a Grandmaster at Age 14" by Alexandra Kosteniuk, pp.
86-90. This discussion, based on a Russian book by Zhuravlev, is the
clearest and best I have seen on the B+N ending. Kosteniuk's father
would drill her by setting up a random position on the board, and
giving her one minute to checkmate him. She says that by the time she
was a second-category player (about 1800 Elo, I think) she could
accomplish this consistently. Rev. Walker apparently has found this
drill useful too.

Personally, I've never had the position in any of my games, and have
seen it only once in rated play, in a club tournament in Cincinnati.

**Isn't it rare! Anyway, I accept all the general points made here about the
worth of drills. My example though, is an untypical set-up, and I wonder how
many readers would be confident in delivering a sub-50 mate from the given
position? PI

The closest I came was an ending I was winning handily, when my
opponent suddenly realized he could sacrifice down to a position where
all I had left was two knights. Unfortunately for him, he still had
one pawn left, which made a win for me theoretically possible. I
didn't mate him, but he did lose on time.




  
Date: 28 Jan 2008 16:45:01
From: David Richerby
Subject: Re: B+N vs. K ending (was: Worst/Best Display of Sportsmanship at a
Taylor Kingston <tkingston@chittenden.com > wrote:
> Many instructional books have described the method for mating with B
>+N. A few from my library:
>
> "Basic Chess Endings" by Reuben Fine, pp. 4-5
> "Dvoretsky's Endgame Manual" (2nd edition) by k Dvoretsky, p. 279
> "How I Became a Grandmaster at Age 14" by Alexandra Kosteniuk, pp.
> 86-90.

There are several methods. `Deletang's triangles' seems to be the
simplest to me but I'll admit I've never sat down and learnt this.


Dave.

--
David Richerby Swiss Beer (TM): it's like a
www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~davidr/ refreshing lager but it's made in
Switzerland!


 
Date: 28 Jan 2008 07:05:28
From: Larry Tapper
Subject: Re: Worst/Best Display of Sportsmanship at a Tournament by Opponent
On Jan 28, 9:41=A0am, David Richerby <dav...@chiark.greenend.org.uk >
wrote:
> Larry Tapper <larry_tap...@yahoo.com> wrote:
> > In the New York Open about 25 years ago, I got a position with
> > bishop and knight vs. lone king against a 2300 player I won't
> > name. First he tried to convince me that this was a theoretical
> > draw; then he disappeared with his clock still ticking, an hour
> > away from a time forfeit.
>
> Talk to the TD, who will almost certainly award you the win by time
> forfeit. =A0Not relevant in a US tournament but FIDE Law 12.5 says,
> ``The player having the move is not allowed to leave the playing area
> without permission of the arbiter.''
>
> Dave.
>

Actually this is what happened. The TD, Bill Goichberg, noticed what
was going on and awarded me the win. Not knowing the relevant rule, I
had just been hanging around the playing hall waiting for the flag to
fall.

To be honest, I felt relieved not having to demonstrate my B+N
technique. This was the only time I've ever had that endgame in
tournament play, even including blitz tournaments. Even so, I thought
my opponent actually trying to persuade me that it was a draw was an
unusually churlish touch.

LT


 
Date: 28 Jan 2008 06:02:54
From: Larry Tapper
Subject: Re: Worst/Best Display of Sportsmanship at a Tournament by Opponent
On Jan 27, 5:16=A0pm, bri...@aol.com wrote:
> The worst display was at a tournament in Atlanta where my opponent had
> a lost position with 30 minutes on his clock. Instead of resigning, he
> grabbed his coat and his hat, didn't look at me at all, and walked
> away.

In the New York Open about 25 years ago, I got a position with bishop
and knight vs. lone king against a 2300 player I won't name. First he
tried to convince me that this was a theoretical draw; then he
disappeared with his clock still ticking, an hour away from a time
forfeit.

LT



>
> Now mind you, I've never had this happen to me before. I was 18 at the
> time and confused as to what was going on. I got the tournament
> director and after seeing what happened, he stopped the clock and gave
> me the point.
>
> Best Display: "Good game!" + handshake + objective post mortem =3D Best
> display
>
> Comments?



  
Date: 28 Jan 2008 09:49:27
From: Chess One
Subject: Re: Worst/Best Display of Sportsmanship at a Tournament by Opponent

"Larry Tapper" <larry_tapper@yahoo.com > wrote in message
news:ebc30107-e0a3-4db4-ad56-4a34072c11aa@p69g2000hsa.googlegroups.com...
On Jan 27, 5:16 pm, bri...@aol.com wrote:
> The worst display was at a tournament in Atlanta where my opponent had
> a lost position with 30 minutes on his clock. Instead of resigning, he
> grabbed his coat and his hat, didn't look at me at all, and walked
> away.

In the New York Open about 25 years ago, I got a position with bishop
and knight vs. lone king against a 2300 player I won't name. First he
tried to convince me that this was a theoretical draw; then he
disappeared with his clock still ticking, an hour away from a time
forfeit.

LT


---
He should have played it out. I asked a local player who has been actively
playing for 35 years recently if he had ever had this position himself, and
he said no. Neither have I.

Anyway... here's a test for chess computer fans - or are people better at
this?

But White Bishop in a corner, the White King in the opposite corner, and the
White Knight in a third - place the Black King in the center [obviously on
an unchecked square, otherwise the position is impossible] and mate within
50 moves.

I can think of 2 black strategies, (a) to hang out in the middle as long as
possible before being forced to the 'bad' corner opposite the White Knights
starting square [so the knight takes more time to arrive on the scene], or
(b) hang out in the middle until the knight advances, then chase the knight
around a bit before choosing either corner.

Since in the 'bad' corner it takes, what? 17 moves to drive the king to the
mate-able corner [??] this would leave 32 moves to get it to the bad corner
and begin to force it to the good one.

Evidently, if White slips up at about move 20, letting the King out of a net
so it can head towards the other bad corner, then likelihood of a draw is
obtained under 50 move rule.

And who, computer or human opponent, is going to do better in this scenario?
Since the position, and hence any known technique, is rare, I would say
chances for draw are quire reasonable.

Phil Innes




   
Date: 28 Jan 2008 11:06:26
From: Mike Murray
Subject: Re: Worst/Best Display of Sportsmanship at a Tournament by Opponent
On Mon, 28 Jan 2008 09:49:27 -0500, "Chess One" <OneChess@comcast.net >
wrote:

>He should have played it out. I asked a local player who has been actively
>playing for 35 years recently if he had ever had this position himself, and
>he said no. Neither have I.

I've never had this occur in OTB play, but have had it twice in online
blitz in the last year, once on the winning side, once on the losing
side. Problem: when I was on the winning side, I was only able to
draw it! And, when I was on the losing side, the winner banged his
moves out to checkmate at about a 2-second per-move clip.

But, I agree. He should have played it out.


   
Date: 28 Jan 2008 06:55:38
From: J.D. Walker
Subject: Re: Worst/Best Display of Sportsmanship at a Tournament by Opponent
Chess One wrote:
> "Larry Tapper" <larry_tapper@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:ebc30107-e0a3-4db4-ad56-4a34072c11aa@p69g2000hsa.googlegroups.com...
> On Jan 27, 5:16 pm, bri...@aol.com wrote:
>> The worst display was at a tournament in Atlanta where my opponent had
>> a lost position with 30 minutes on his clock. Instead of resigning, he
>> grabbed his coat and his hat, didn't look at me at all, and walked
>> away.
>
> In the New York Open about 25 years ago, I got a position with bishop
> and knight vs. lone king against a 2300 player I won't name. First he
> tried to convince me that this was a theoretical draw; then he
> disappeared with his clock still ticking, an hour away from a time
> forfeit.
>
> LT
>
>
> ---
> He should have played it out. I asked a local player who has been actively
> playing for 35 years recently if he had ever had this position himself, and
> he said no. Neither have I.
>
> Anyway... here's a test for chess computer fans - or are people better at
> this?
>
> But White Bishop in a corner, the White King in the opposite corner, and the
> White Knight in a third - place the Black King in the center [obviously on
> an unchecked square, otherwise the position is impossible] and mate within
> 50 moves.
>
> I can think of 2 black strategies, (a) to hang out in the middle as long as
> possible before being forced to the 'bad' corner opposite the White Knights
> starting square [so the knight takes more time to arrive on the scene], or
> (b) hang out in the middle until the knight advances, then chase the knight
> around a bit before choosing either corner.
>
> Since in the 'bad' corner it takes, what? 17 moves to drive the king to the
> mate-able corner [??] this would leave 32 moves to get it to the bad corner
> and begin to force it to the good one.
>
> Evidently, if White slips up at about move 20, letting the King out of a net
> so it can head towards the other bad corner, then likelihood of a draw is
> obtained under 50 move rule.
>
> And who, computer or human opponent, is going to do better in this scenario?
> Since the position, and hence any known technique, is rare, I would say
> chances for draw are quire reasonable.
>
> Phil Innes
>

I used to have an exercise I did for blitz play. Place the pieces (B,
N, and Ks) on random squares. Then with a competent opponent, mate the
black king in two or three minutes. It becomes second nature if you
practice it enough.
--

Cordially,
Rev. J.D. Walker, MsD, U.C.


  
Date: 28 Jan 2008 14:41:24
From: David Richerby
Subject: Re: Worst/Best Display of Sportsmanship at a Tournament by Opponent
Larry Tapper <larry_tapper@yahoo.com > wrote:
> In the New York Open about 25 years ago, I got a position with
> bishop and knight vs. lone king against a 2300 player I won't
> name. First he tried to convince me that this was a theoretical
> draw; then he disappeared with his clock still ticking, an hour
> away from a time forfeit.

Talk to the TD, who will almost certainly award you the win by time
forfeit. Not relevant in a US tournament but FIDE Law 12.5 says,
``The player having the move is not allowed to leave the playing area
without permission of the arbiter.''


Dave.

--
David Richerby Laptop Dish (TM): it's like a fine
www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~davidr/ ceramic dish that you can put on
your lap!


 
Date: 28 Jan 2008 10:18:08
From: e4.c5
Subject: Re: Worst/Best Display of Sportsmanship at a Tournament by Opponent

<briern@aol.com > wrote in message
news:051af4a6-59ed-4703-8657-1da9f034f1c9@d70g2000hsb.googlegroups.com...
> The worst display was at a tournament in Atlanta where my opponent had
> a lost position with 30 minutes on his clock. Instead of resigning, he
> grabbed his coat and his hat, didn't look at me at all, and walked
> away.
>
> Now mind you, I've never had this happen to me before. I was 18 at the
> time and confused as to what was going on. I got the tournament
> director and after seeing what happened, he stopped the clock and gave
> me the point.
>
> Best Display: "Good game!" + handshake + objective post mortem = Best
> display
>
> Comments?


I think internet chess is worse, you know the routine, won position,
opponent decides not to move and you have to wait until the time runs out :)



 
Date: 27 Jan 2008 16:30:11
From: Taylor Kingston
Subject: Re: Worst/Best Display of Sportsmanship at a Tournament by Opponent
On Jan 27, 6:46=A0pm, raven1 <quoththera...@nevermore.com > wrote:
>
> "Faith may not move mountains, but you should see what it does to skyscrap=
ers..."

That strikes me as being in very poor taste.



  
Date: 28 Jan 2008 10:55:13
From: raven1
Subject: Re: Worst/Best Display of Sportsmanship at a Tournament by Opponent
On Sun, 27 Jan 2008 16:30:11 -0800 (PST), Taylor Kingston
<tkingston@chittenden.com > wrote:

>On Jan 27, 6:46 pm, raven1 <quoththera...@nevermore.com> wrote:
>>
>> "Faith may not move mountains, but you should see what it does to skyscrapers..."
>
> That strikes me as being in very poor taste.

Perhaps, but it's meant to make a point that unfortunately probably
goes over the heads of the people it's directed at.
---

"Faith may not move mountains, but you should see what it does to skyscrapers..."


  
Date: 27 Jan 2008 17:41:28
From: J.D. Walker
Subject: Re: Worst/Best Display of Sportsmanship at a Tournament by Opponent
Taylor Kingston wrote:
> On Jan 27, 6:46 pm, raven1 <quoththera...@nevermore.com> wrote:
>> "Faith may not move mountains, but you should see what it does to skyscrapers..."
>
> That strikes me as being in very poor taste.
>

Yes, but it is much milder than what they claim Bobby Fischer has said
about it...

Bobby Fischer and Andre' the Giant (who died on this day), may they both
rest in peace.
--

Cordially,
Rev. J.D. Walker, MsD, U.C.


   
Date: 28 Jan 2008 11:15:21
From: Mike Murray
Subject: Re: Worst/Best Display of Sportsmanship at a Tournament by Opponent
On Sun, 27 Jan 2008 17:41:28 -0800, "J.D. Walker"
<j.d.walker@comcast.net > wrote:


>Bobby Fischer and Andre' the Giant (who died on this day), may they both
>rest in peace.

Watching Wrestling From Chicago on TV as a kid, I was always a fan of
Yukon Eric, who it turns out grew up in Monroe, WA. Shoeless, his
face stayed blank and expressionless as he lumbered forward, shaking
off kicks and blows, trying to lock his opponent in his famous
bear-hug. Maybe that's why I've always been partial to the White side
of the Closed Sicilian.

I had always wondered what happened to him. Recently, I found out.
When his wife left him, he returned to the church where they'd been
ried and blew his brains out.


 
Date: 27 Jan 2008 18:46:57
From: raven1
Subject: Re: Worst/Best Display of Sportsmanship at a Tournament by Opponent
On Sun, 27 Jan 2008 14:16:01 -0800 (PST), briern@aol.com wrote:

>The worst display was at a tournament in Atlanta where my opponent had
>a lost position with 30 minutes on his clock. Instead of resigning, he
>grabbed his coat and his hat, didn't look at me at all, and walked
>away.
>
>Now mind you, I've never had this happen to me before. I was 18 at the
>time and confused as to what was going on. I got the tournament
>director and after seeing what happened, he stopped the clock and gave
>me the point.
>
>Best Display: "Good game!" + handshake + objective post mortem = Best
>display
>
>Comments?

Nimzovich jumping on the table shouting "why must I lose to this
idiot?" has to be up there...
---

"Faith may not move mountains, but you should see what it does to skyscrapers..."


  
Date: 28 Jan 2008 01:00:57
From: Ralf Callenberg
Subject: Re: Worst/Best Display of Sportsmanship at a Tournament by Opponent
28.01.2008 00:46, raven1:


> Nimzovich jumping on the table shouting "why must I lose to this
> idiot?" has to be up there...

On which side of the slash?

Greetings,
Ralf


 
Date: 27 Jan 2008 14:48:43
From: Taylor Kingston
Subject: Re: Worst/Best Display of Sportsmanship at a Tournament by Opponent
On Jan 27, 5:27=A0pm, "J.D. Walker" <j.d.wal...@comcast.net > wrote:
> bri...@aol.com wrote:
> > The worst display was at a tournament in Atlanta where my opponent had
> > a lost position with 30 minutes on his clock. Instead of resigning, he
> > grabbed his coat and his hat, didn't look at me at all, and walked
> > away.
>
> > Now mind you, I've never had this happen to me before. I was 18 at the
> > time and confused as to what was going on. I got the tournament
> > director and after seeing what happened, he stopped the clock and gave
> > me the point.
>
> > Best Display: "Good game!" + handshake + objective post mortem =3D Best
> > display
>
> > Comments?
>
> Once upon a time, a certain well-known, if infamous, chess master in the
> Pacific NW was playing a game with future-to-be grandmaster Duncan
> Suttles. =A0Let's just call the master "Dirty J." =A0Dirty J had reached a=

> losing position against Suttles. =A0He pulled out some hair, and threw his=

> hands in the air. =A0He looked at Suttles and growled, "We may as well go
> get some breakfast. =A0Care to join me on my dollar?" =A0Suttles agreed an=
d
> they made their way out to the stairway while McCormick's clock kept
> ticking. =A0Suddenly Dirty J turned to Suttles and said, "just a minute, I=

> need to grab my coat." =A0He rushed back in, made a quick move, punched
> his clock, grabbed his coat, and returned to a fine breakfast with Mr.
> Suttles.
>
> When they returned, Suttles learned that he had forfeited on time. =A0That=

> was a great lesson in un-sportsmanship...

It's because of such stories that I always insist on any ambiguous
statement being clarified in a serious game. In Suttles' shoes, I
would have replied to the breakfast invitation with "Does that mean
you resign the game?" The same applies to unclear actions like
stopping the clock, or extending a hand and saying "Nice game." Best
to insist on a signed scoresheet, just to have some physical evidence
in case of a dispute.


 
Date: 27 Jan 2008 14:27:35
From: J.D. Walker
Subject: Re: Worst/Best Display of Sportsmanship at a Tournament by Opponent
briern@aol.com wrote:
> The worst display was at a tournament in Atlanta where my opponent had
> a lost position with 30 minutes on his clock. Instead of resigning, he
> grabbed his coat and his hat, didn't look at me at all, and walked
> away.
>
> Now mind you, I've never had this happen to me before. I was 18 at the
> time and confused as to what was going on. I got the tournament
> director and after seeing what happened, he stopped the clock and gave
> me the point.
>
> Best Display: "Good game!" + handshake + objective post mortem = Best
> display
>
> Comments?

Once upon a time, a certain well-known, if infamous, chess master in the
Pacific NW was playing a game with future-to-be grandmaster Duncan
Suttles. Let's just call the master "Dirty J." Dirty J had reached a
losing position against Suttles. He pulled out some hair, and threw his
hands in the air. He looked at Suttles and growled, "We may as well go
get some breakfast. Care to join me on my dollar?" Suttles agreed and
they made their way out to the stairway while McCormick's clock kept
ticking. Suddenly Dirty J turned to Suttles and said, "just a minute, I
need to grab my coat." He rushed back in, made a quick move, punched
his clock, grabbed his coat, and returned to a fine breakfast with Mr.
Suttles.

When they returned, Suttles learned that he had forfeited on time. That
was a great lesson in un-sportsmanship...
--

Cordially,
Rev. J.D. Walker, MsD, U.C.


  
Date: 27 Jan 2008 16:14:13
From: Mike Murray
Subject: Re: Worst/Best Display of Sportsmanship at a Tournament by Opponent
On Sun, 27 Jan 2008 14:27:35 -0800, "J.D. Walker"
<j.d.walker@comcast.net > wrote:

>When they returned, Suttles learned that he had forfeited on time. That
>was a great lesson in un-sportsmanship...

Not quite in the same league, but a few weeks ago, Ernst Rasmussen,
playing in a Tacoma tournament, reached a winning position against
some kid. Without a word, the kid left for well over an hour,
returning with a couple minutes on his clock. He then started playing
blitz speed, evidently hoping to rattle Ernst. Unflappable, Ernst
slowly and deliberately cashed in his win. The kid then offered to
shake hands. Ernst declined, telling him "I don't shake hands with
assholes".