Main
Date: 17 Nov 2006 05:52:44
From: jsfromynr
Subject: Capablanca Rule
Hello All,

While going through one of the books ,it said in order to create a
passed
pawn you should move the unopposed pawn first.
One book says it is Cheron's Rule other says it is Capa's rule. No
matter who suggested it . It is meaningful for situtaions that arise
mostly in chess game.
Are there any more such rules a player can follow to make progress??


With Warm regards
Jatinder Singh





 
Date: 22 Nov 2006 04:04:33
From: tOmmetje
Subject: Re: Capablanca Rule

Antonio Torrecillas schreef:

> En/na tOmmetje ha escrit:
> > I'm very curious about his book on openings though. I hope it will be
> > distributed free as a pdf? :-)
>
> you can be disapointed twice!
>
> In first place because I suppose it will be not free (nor pdf) and in
> second place reading it.
>
> Antonio

If it was free I would definately read it. Just to know how good he is
and how well he can teach others the game.



 
Date: 21 Nov 2006 16:05:16
From: tOmmetje
Subject: Re: Capablanca Rule
Then I'm not interested in your book.



  
Date: 22 Nov 2006 12:20:08
From: Ray Gordon, creator of the \pivot\
Subject: Re: Capablanca Rule
> Then I'm not interested in your book.

Never thought you were.


--
Money is not "game."
Looks are not "game."
Social status or value is not "game."
Those are the things that game makes unnecessary.

A seduction guru who teaches you that looks, money or status is game is not
teaching you "game," but how to be an AFC. He uses his students' money to
get women and laughs that "AFCs pay my rent."




 
Date: 21 Nov 2006 08:42:52
From: [email protected]
Subject: Re: Capablanca Rule

jsfromynr wrote:
> Hello All,
>
> While going through one of the books ,it said in order to create a
> passed
> pawn you should move the unopposed pawn first.
> One book says it is Cheron's Rule other says it is Capa's rule. No
> matter who suggested it . It is meaningful for situtaions that arise
> mostly in chess game.
> Are there any more such rules a player can follow to make progress??
>
>
> With Warm regards
> Jatinder Singh

Join us!

http://chess-training.blogspot.com

Read entire blog and learn how to study chess effectively on your own.



 
Date: 20 Nov 2006 13:53:51
From: tOmmetje
Subject: Re: Capablanca Rule
I'm very curious about his book on openings though. I hope it will be
distributed free as a pdf? :-)



  
Date: 22 Nov 2006 10:56:59
From: Antonio Torrecillas
Subject: Re: Capablanca Rule
En/na tOmmetje ha escrit:
> I'm very curious about his book on openings though. I hope it will be
> distributed free as a pdf? :-)

you can be disapointed twice!

In first place because I suppose it will be not free (nor pdf) and in
second place reading it.

Antonio



  
Date: 21 Nov 2006 17:45:25
From: Ray Gordon, creator of the \pivot\
Subject: Re: Capablanca Rule
> I'm very curious about his book on openings though. I hope it will be
> distributed free as a pdf? :-)

Not legally, though I was tempted to release some dummy versions that hung
pieces for the pirates.

In fact, there will likely be no e-version of the book in order to ensure
that any PDFs that do surface are absolutely illegal.


--
Money is not "game."
Looks are not "game."
Social status or value is not "game."
Those are the things that game makes unnecessary.

A seduction guru who teaches you that looks, money or status is game is not
teaching you "game," but how to be an AFC. He uses his students' money to
get women and laughs that "AFCs pay my rent."




  
Date: 20 Nov 2006 17:31:55
From: Chris F.A. Johnson
Subject: Re: Capablanca Rule
On 2006-11-20, tOmmetje wrote:
> I'm very curious about his book on openings though. I hope it will be
> distributed free as a pdf? :-)

If I wanted to read it, I'd want it in almost anything except PDF.

--
Chris F.A. Johnson <http://cfaj.freeshell.org >
===================================================================
Author:
Shell Scripting Recipes: A Problem-Solution Approach (2005, Apress)


 
Date: 17 Nov 2006 09:59:58
From: Ray Gordon, creator of the \pivot\
Subject: Re: Capablanca Rule
> Hello All,
>
> While going through one of the books ,it said in order to create a
> passed
> pawn you should move the unopposed pawn first.
> One book says it is Cheron's Rule other says it is Capa's rule. No
> matter who suggested it . It is meaningful for situtaions that arise
> mostly in chess game.
> Are there any more such rules a player can follow to make progress??

Don't move any piece twice until you've moved every piece once.

Don't castle until your king needs safety and you have nothing more
productive to do.


--
Money is not "game."
Looks are not "game."
Social status or value is not "game."
Those are the things that game makes unnecessary.

A seduction guru who teaches you that looks, money or status is game is not
teaching you "game," but how to be an AFC. He uses his students' money to
get women and laughs that "AFCs pay my rent."




  
Date: 17 Nov 2006 16:39:22
From: Terry
Subject: Re: Capablanca Rule

"Ray Gordon, creator of the "pivot"" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>> Hello All,
>>
>> While going through one of the books ,it said in order to create a
>> passed
>> pawn you should move the unopposed pawn first.
>> One book says it is Cheron's Rule other says it is Capa's rule. No
>> matter who suggested it . It is meaningful for situtaions that arise
>> mostly in chess game.
>> Are there any more such rules a player can follow to make progress??
>
> Don't move any piece twice until you've moved every piece once.
>
> Don't castle until your king needs safety and you have nothing more
> productive to do.
>
>

Your last suggestion looks a little suspect.

Regards




  
Date: 17 Nov 2006 16:30:36
From: Antonio Torrecillas
Subject: Re: Capablanca Rule
En/na Ray Gordon, creator of the "pivot" ha escrit:
> Don't castle until your king needs safety and you have nothing more
> productive to do.

This rule is a sign of Ray chess understanding.

Any low-level player knows that to castle is a development move, in many
cases the center is open and our rooks would like to ocuppy "e" or "d"
lines to be active.

Antonio



   
Date: 17 Nov 2006 19:00:34
From: Ray Gordon, creator of the \pivot\
Subject: Re: Capablanca Rule
>> Don't castle until your king needs safety and you have nothing more
>> productive to do.
>
> This rule is a sign of Ray chess understanding.
>
> Any low-level player knows that to castle is a development move, in many
> cases the center is open and our rooks would like to ocuppy "e" or "d"
> lines to be active.

Castling is not always the ideal development. Sometimes not castling can
throw the opponent off.

Ed Mednis said more or less what I did in "King Power In Chess."

When I publish my book on openings I'll explain my position more thoroughly.

--
Money is not "game."
Looks are not "game."
Social status or value is not "game."
Those are the things that game makes unnecessary.

A seduction guru who teaches you that looks, money or status is game is not
teaching you "game," but how to be an AFC. He uses his students' money to
get women and laughs that "AFCs pay my rent."




    
Date: 18 Nov 2006 10:17:31
From: Antonio Torrecillas
Subject: Re: Capablanca Rule
En/na Ray Gordon, creator of the "pivot" ha escrit:

>>>Don't castle until your king needs safety and you have nothing more
>>>productive to do.
>>
>>This rule is a sign of Ray chess understanding.
>>
>>Any low-level player knows that to castle is a development move, in many
>>cases the center is open and our rooks would like to ocuppy "e" or "d"
>>lines to be active.
>
> Castling is not always the ideal development. Sometimes not castling can
> throw the opponent off.
> Ed Mednis said more or less what I did in "King Power In Chess."
> When I publish my book on openings I'll explain my position more thoroughly.

People which compare my "in many cases" with your "not allways ...
sometimes" distingish between a rule and the exceptions. You provide a
wrong rule and now you claim the rule can be the opposite and there are
exceptions. Ray, ... be serious!!

Can you provide us exact Mednis words?

...........

Here an old example from my experience: In that game played long ago you
can see how 0-0 can help white development. Looking at final position
you will recognize that 0-0 and Re1 actually were development moves.
There are millions similar examples not only from GM practice but only
from amateur play.

[Event "Barcelona"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "1979.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Torrecillas tinez, Antonio"]
[Black "Carrillo, Pepe"]
[Result "1-0"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5 4. c3 Nf6 5. d4 exd4 6. e5 Qe7 7. O-O Ng8
8. cxd4 Bb6 9. d5 Na5 10. d6 cxd6 11.exd6 Qf6 12. Qe2+ Kf8 13. Re1 Qd8
14. Ne5 Nxc4 15. Qxc4 Qf6 16. Qxc8+ Rxc8 17. Nxd7# 1-0

Antonio

Ps: I have no hope you would say anything interesting in that treath (as
usual, you state a wrong rule and do not enter in the following
discussion apart of to menace with legal actions toward honest people
who claims you are wrong and provide examples and explanations)



     
Date: 25 Nov 2006 06:13:46
From: Ray Gordon, creator of the \pivot\
Subject: Re: Capablanca Rule
>>>This rule is a sign of Ray chess understanding.
>>>
>>>Any low-level player knows that to castle is a development move, in many
>>>cases the center is open and our rooks would like to ocuppy "e" or "d"
>>>lines to be active.
>>
>> Castling is not always the ideal development. Sometimes not castling can
>> throw the opponent off.
>> Ed Mednis said more or less what I did in "King Power In Chess."
>> When I publish my book on openings I'll explain my position more
>> thoroughly.
>
> People which compare my "in many cases" with your "not allways ...
> sometimes" distingish between a rule and the exceptions. You provide a
> wrong rule and now you claim the rule can be the opposite and there are
> exceptions. Ray, ... be serious!!

Exceptions can be extremely powerful and lead to wins over the world's
strongest players, especially if they are playing by rote against someone
weaker.

Not castling is a common theme in several openings I play, and should always
be considered as an option.

> Can you provide us exact Mednis words?

If I can find my copy of "King Power In Chess" sure. I don't use chess
books anymore, just software. This was from the 1980s.

Medins spoke of players who have a "prima donna king" who doesn't get
involved in the action. I did once manage to win a game (and an u-2000
prize) by getting three pieces for my queen and walking my king out into an
open fourth rank before retreating him (barely), consolidating, and winning.

> Here an old example from my experience: In that game played long ago you
> can see how 0-0 can help white development. Looking at final position you
> will recognize that 0-0 and Re1 actually were development moves. There are
> millions similar examples not only from GM practice but only from amateur
> play.
>
> 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5

3...Nf6 and we never see your line.


--
Money is not "game."
Looks are not "game."
Social status or value is not "game."
Those are the things that game makes unnecessary.

A seduction guru who teaches you that looks, money or status is game is not
teaching you "game," but how to be an AFC. He uses his students' money to
get women and laughs that "AFCs pay my rent."




      
Date: 25 Nov 2006 13:31:10
From: Antonio Torrecillas
Subject: Re: Capablanca Rule
En/na Ray Gordon, creator of the "pivot" ha escrit:

>>Can you provide us exact Mednis words?
>
> If I can find my copy of "King Power In Chess" sure. I don't use chess
> books anymore, just software. This was from the 1980s.

As usual Ray giving us concrete data and helping our discusions.

>>Here an old example from my experience: In that game played long ago you
>>can see how 0-0 can help white development. Looking at final position you
>>will recognize that 0-0 and Re1 actually were development moves. There are
>>millions similar examples not only from GM practice but only from amateur
>>play.
>>
>>1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Bc5
>
> 3...Nf6 and we never see your line.

If that is your best contribution to that example I posted to show how
to castle is a developing move. I ask me if you did not see that 1...g6
or 1...b6 are shorter contributions (lol).

But I will continue posting here examples of the same subject (to castle
usually is a developing move. It was a bit difficult because you are
retraining my opening choices but I will try:

[Event "Trieste"]
[Site "?"]
[Date "1923.??.??"]
[Round "?"]
[White "Canal"]
[Black "Johner"]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "C56"]
[PlyCount "25"]
[EventDate "1923.??.??"]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6 4. d4 exd4 5. O-O Nxe4 6. Re1 d5 7. Nc3
dxc4 8.Rxe4+ Be6 9. Nxd4 Nxd4 10. Rxd4 Qc8 11. Bg5 Bd6 12. Ne4 O-O 13.
Nf6+ {and white won later 1-0 Here that move was possible thank to the
line} 13 ...Kh8 14.Qh5 Bf5 15.Rh4 Bg6 16.Qxh7 Bxh7 17.Rxh7 {observe the
participation of that rook was possible thanks to 5.0-0}

Not hoping anything interesting from Ray,
Antonio



      
Date: 25 Nov 2006 13:05:30
From: Antonio Torrecillas
Subject: Re: Capablanca Rule
En/na Ray Gordon, creator of the "pivot" ha escrit:
>>>>This rule is a sign of Ray chess understanding.
>>>>
>>>>Any low-level player knows that to castle is a development move, in many
>>>>cases the center is open and our rooks would like to ocuppy "e" or "d"
>>>>lines to be active.
>>>
>>>Castling is not always the ideal development. Sometimes not castling can
>>>throw the opponent off. (...)


Sometimes I ask me why I try to discuss chess with you, if you never
provide us any constructive opinion.

Here we were discussing abou general rules and you now write "not
allways and "sometimes".

This situation is like explaining "honey taste" to pigs (Spaninh
traslation is a know Spanish expression)

Antonio