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Date: 07 Apr 2005 13:08:03
From: LSD
Subject: Getting the most of Chessbase and CM Analysis.
Who here looks at engine analysis while they're playing a game? I don't mean
cheating against internet players, I mean when you're having a casual game with
your computer for practice. I find the personalities in CM10 to be more varied
and fun to play then against CB 9 or even Fritz 8. But CB 9 provides far better
and more customizable analysis, and annotation options.

Do you analyse the game as you go? Or do you play all the way through only on
your own strength, and analyse afterwards? I usually settle for a middleground
between those two: When I am not sure what move to make, first I start the
engine analysing the position, but keep the results hidden from view while I
spend some time trying to figure out some candidate moves, and then the best
move, and then see if the engine agrees.

Assuming my objective is improve my game as quickly as possible, what's the best
way
to use these programs to achieve that objective?

Thanks in advance,

LSD






 
Date: 08 Apr 2005 09:03:24
From: Dan-the-K
Subject: Re: Getting the most of Chessbase and CM Analysis.
> Assuming my objective is improve my game as quickly as possible,
what's
the best
> way
> to use these programs to achieve that objective?


Pick up GM Kotov's _Think Like a Grandmaster_ for the long answer. :)
I was
inspired to write the Bookup program 21 years ago while reading this
book.

The short answer is to completely document everything you know about a
position, noting every reply you considered in your analysis. THEN
unleash
the silicon beasts to see where you have holes in your thinking.


Correct your thinking. Repeat. You'll improve your game as quickly as

possible IMHO. That approach took Kotov from master to super GM in his

time.


Mike Leahy
"The Database Man!"
www.bookup.com


>From the point of view of a novice: I could never have a reasonably
equal match against any computer software, except, perhaps, Turing or
DelfiT.

Thus, the computer opponent is to learn from. If I don't have a clue
what move to make, I'll ask for a hint or consider the computer's
analysis. I also find it helpful to complete the game, submit it for
analysis, and see where I made a critical error. Then I play the game
again with better moves at those points. I may go through this process
2 or 3 times before I tire of the game. Admittedly, this is less
intensive than Mike Leahy's method.

If I play a computer as a real game, I hide the analysis. That's a
little difficult on the Novag Star Diamond because it displays the
computer's thinking whether you like it or not.

HTTH



 
Date: 07 Apr 2005 17:45:07
From: Mike Leahy
Subject: Re: Getting the most of Chessbase and CM Analysis.

"LSD" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]

> Assuming my objective is improve my game as quickly as possible, what's
the best
> way
> to use these programs to achieve that objective?

Pick up GM Kotov's _Think Like a Grandmaster_ for the long answer. :) I was
inspired to write the Bookup program 21 years ago while reading this book.

The short answer is to completely document everything you know about a
position, noting every reply you considered in your analysis. THEN unleash
the silicon beasts to see where you have holes in your thinking.

Correct your thinking. Repeat. You'll improve your game as quickly as
possible IMHO. That approach took Kotov from master to super GM in his
time.


Mike Leahy
"The Database Man!"
www.bookup.com