Main
Date: 28 Apr 2005 17:20:35
From: Sam Sloan
Subject: Nakamura Attack
For centuries it has been an opening that every chess player knows
about and has played against, but has never had a name.

Now, it has a name. Before, it was just the Patzer Opening. Everybody
knew what that was, but that was not an official name.

This solves a problem for me because for years I have had a problem
trying to explain to my students why this opening was no good. Yet, I
could not demonstrate a refutation.

Now we know that there is no refutation. It is an opening played by a
top grandmaster.

It is the Nakamura Attack, and without even an official naming
ceremony, every active chess player in the world already knows what it
is. It is the opening 1. e4 e5 2. Qh5 !!!!

Sam Sloan




 
Date: 14 May 2005 18:39:20
From: Mikko J Piippo
Subject: Re: Nakamura Attack
In article <[email protected] >,
Sam Sloan <[email protected] > wrote:
>Now we know that there is no refutation. It is an opening played by a
>top grandmaster.

Playd by a GM and lost against GM Sasikiran...though in 87 moves.

MP



--
--
Mikko Piippo - Renvall-instituutti - Helsingin yliopisto - Finland
http://www.helsinki.fi/~piippo/



  
Date: 14 May 2005 16:47:11
From: Ron
Subject: Re: Nakamura Attack
In article <[email protected] >,
[email protected] (Mikko J Piippo) wrote:

> >Now we know that there is no refutation. It is an opening played by a
> >top grandmaster.
>
> Playd by a GM and lost against GM Sasikiran...though in 87 moves.

Yes, although if you've looked over the game you'll see that Nakamura
missed a chance in the middlegame to continue his attack more
successfully.


 
Date: 06 May 2005 09:49:30
From: Orange_Chess
Subject: Re: Nakamura Attack - Andy Soltis Comments !!
The kid has an open mind and a good sense of humor.
He lost the game because he was fearless with his attack later
on...which he almost pulled off it appears to me.
Tal didn't start playing "correct and practical" chess until well after
he lost his rematch with Botvinnik. (I believe he said that had he had
the positional skills he aquired later in his career, he would have had
no trouble defending his title)
Naka's positional skills will only grow in time. Just wait and see what
kind of brillaint wins we get when that happens. He'll need them to
play at the Super GM level.



  
Date: 06 May 2005 20:04:11
From: Chess One
Subject: Re: Nakamura Attack - Andy Soltis Comments !!
good post!

and entirely correct about tal, whose 'projects' were very difficult to
refute when the clock was ticking.

i think america has found itself a new pugilist on the fischer-scale

cordially, phil innes

"Orange_Chess" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> The kid has an open mind and a good sense of humor.
> He lost the game because he was fearless with his attack later
> on...which he almost pulled off it appears to me.
> Tal didn't start playing "correct and practical" chess until well after
> he lost his rematch with Botvinnik. (I believe he said that had he had
> the positional skills he aquired later in his career, he would have had
> no trouble defending his title)
> Naka's positional skills will only grow in time. Just wait and see what
> kind of brillaint wins we get when that happens. He'll need them to
> play at the Super GM level.
>




 
Date: 03 May 2005 15:32:17
From: ian
Subject: Re: Nakamura Attack - Andy Soltis Comments !!

Mike Vetto wrote:
> Idiot, its not about my rating. Gm's games are suppsoed to be
masterful, and
> when you go through the moves, you will say wow, i never thought of
that.
> This is not so with Hikaru, he plays typical moves, not stong moves
like
> those of Fischer and Morphy OR OTHER MOST GM'S. They only reason he
has that
> rating is because he PLAYED CHESS FOR 16 YEARS AND HES ONLY 18
NOW!!!!!!!
> ALSO HE LSOT TO A 9 EYAR OLD. SAD. HE NEEDS TO GET A LIFE, AND IAM
PRETTY
> SURE HE WILL QUIT CHESS, THEY ALL DO!!! EX. FISCHER, WAITZKIN,
MORPHY. CHILD
> PLAYERS WILL ALWAYS LOSE INTEREST. ITS A KNOWN FACT. AND DUNT YOU
DARE TELL
> ME TO GET A LIFE, BECAUSE I HAVE ONE, AND I HATE PEOPLE LIKE YOU WHO
MAKE
> JUDGEMENTS WITH NO REASON AT ALL. PEOPLE LIKE YOU SHOULD BE HANGED
UNTIL
> YOUR HEAD COMES OFF FROM THE BODY!!!! I CAN HAVE MY OWN OPINIONS, MY
OWN
> REASONABLE OPINIONS. AND I NEVER THOUGHT OF CHESS AS WINS AND LOSES.
THIS
> EXPLAINS HOW IMMATURE YOU ARE, IF YOUR ONLY CONCERNED ABOUT THE
RATING THEN
> I FEEL SORRY FOR YOU BECAUSE YOUR MISSING THE WHOLE POINT OF PLAYING
CHESS.
> I COULD WRITE PAGES ON THIS, PLEASE DUNT MAKE ME, AND FINALLY LET ME
ASK
> YOU, WHY DO YOU PLAY CHESS?? AND DUNT TRY TO ANSWER IT IN A SIMPLE
WAY LIKE,
> OH! TIS FUN, IT HELPS YOU THINK, ETC. I WANT YOU TO THINK WHY YOU
REALLY
> PLAY CHESS. DO YOU KNOW WHY I PLAY CHESS, BECAUSE I ASPIRE TO BE ONE
OF THE
> CHAMPINOS, I WANT MY NAME IN NEWSPAPERS FORTHE GAME PLAY I DID, NOT
FOR THE
> WINS AND LOSSES. THAT IS WHY UNLIKE YOU, I PLAY CHESS EVERY MOMENT I
CAN
> SPARE. DO YOU KNOW HOW? IN MY MIND. THINK ABOUT IT. AND SO WITH THAT,
I WANT
> TO SAY, STOP WORRYING ABOUT ME, AND WORRY ABOUT YOURSELF. IT MIGHT
HELP YOU
> ON THE LONGRUN!!!!!

you missed BURN IN HELL TROLL



 
Date: 03 May 2005 04:18:30
From: Error Flink
Subject: Re: Nakamura Attack
"It is rubbish."

It depends. There is a surprise effect, useful in internet blitz games.
Not everybody knows the best replies. I usually play against opponents
(much) lower rated than 2000. Once or twice, 2...g6?? was replied. :-))
Chess should be fun.

I like it. When I lose such games, it's certainly not caused by 2.Qh5?!.



 
Date: 02 May 2005 06:13:25
From: ian
Subject: Re: Nakamura Attack

Sam Sloan wrote:
> For centuries it has been an opening that every chess player knows
> about and has played against, but has never had a name.
>
> Now, it has a name. Before, it was just the Patzer Opening. Everybody
> knew what that was, but that was not an official name.
>

What do you mean official? On who's authority has it been named thus,
by a multi million pound maniac who kills dissenters? What a
progression for chess if this is so.

> This solves a problem for me because for years I have had a problem
> trying to explain to my students why this opening was no good. Yet, I
> could not demonstrate a refutation.
>
> Now we know that there is no refutation. It is an opening played by a
> top grandmaster.

What? Ray Keene's voice has just echoed through my brain. The opening
is known as giving a bad position, being played by a grandmaster does
nothing to augment or repudiate this.

>
> It is the Nakamura Attack, and without even an official naming
> ceremony, every active chess player in the world already knows what
it
> is. It is the opening 1. e4 e5 2. Qh5 !!!!
>
It is rubbish.



 
Date: 01 May 2005 07:47:14
From: [email protected]
Subject: Re: Nakamura Attack
Now Mr. Bauer - hah! German is Bauer for pion, and I no need! You stay
focus on other topics, else I get file on you, contact your cheefs and
real father I know from secret meeting at Plum Brandy Lover's Reunion.
I am Internet GM, you nothing, I even know ISP you use and know you buy
women's clothing! Pervesion peeples like you kill Alekhine and Keres,
and now try kill Fischer! Fischer write me, tell me my game brilliant -
although he no like clime device in Iceland and ask me send him one
from former Yugoslavia - never before seen. He also say we naming this
Tomic attack, and no peace loving democratic man try to stop me or I
get him with secrets information! I have files and friend Gordo is
lawyer, only without actual degree or passing bar - who need? Strike a
match! Like passing gas!

GMGOranTOmic
Owner, Tomic/Gordo Chess School for Clinically Insane

Send tuiton check to:

666 Shit Hole I live in
Former Yugoslobia



 
Date: 01 May 2005 08:06:32
From: Bugsy
Subject: Re: Nakamura Attack - Andy Soltis Comments !!
AMERICAN TEEN MAKES GMS LAUGH

By ANDY SOLTIS
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


May 1, 2005 -- Chess Grandmaster


THEY laughed when Hikaru Nakamura, the new star of U.S. chess, sat down
to play his seventh-round game at the recent Sigeman international
tournament in Copenhagen last month.

They laughed because the 18-year-old's opening was a joke — 1 e4 e5 2
Qh5!?.

After Black defended his attacked e-pawn, White continued 3 Bc4,
threatening the oldest trap in the book, the "Scholar's Mate." If Black
falls asleep, White plays 4 Qxf7 mate!.

Nakamura's opponent, Grandmaster Krishnan Sasikiran of India, didn't
snooze. He played 3 . . . g6 and eventually won in 87 moves.

White's opening is so bizarre, it doesn't even have a name.

Virtually every beginner's book warns against moving the queen early in
the game, especially on the second move.

The queen will inevitably be driven back when attacked by lesser pieces,
as Nakamura's was by 3 . . . g6 4 Qf3 Nf6 5 Ne2 Bg7 6 Nbc3 d6 7 d3 Bg4.

Yet below the highest levels in chess, the world championships, almost
any opening can be tried.

A database check shows that 2 Qh5 has been played more than 300 times in
tournament chess since 1991, mainly in junior events — and has scored
about 30 percent.

Then again, 1 h3, has been played nearly 250 times over that period —
and has done even better.


  
Date: 01 May 2005 10:40:39
From: Mike Vetto
Subject: Re: Nakamura Attack - Andy Soltis Comments !!
Qh5 in the 3rd move is not a move that should receive an exclamation k.
After playing Qh5 by white, black can develop almost all his pieces by
threating the queen. And personally i dunt like the games of Hikaru
Nakamura, they are not games you can say WOW! for. He plays like the
conputer, boring moves, but with great positional & tactical advantage, but
still boring. And a move you would expect for a person of that rating.



"Bugsy" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> AMERICAN TEEN MAKES GMS LAUGH
>
> By ANDY SOLTIS
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
>
> May 1, 2005 -- Chess Grandmaster
>
>
> THEY laughed when Hikaru Nakamura, the new star of U.S. chess, sat down to
> play his seventh-round game at the recent Sigeman international tournament
> in Copenhagen last month.
>
> They laughed because the 18-year-old's opening was a joke — 1 e4 e5 2
> Qh5!?.
>
> After Black defended his attacked e-pawn, White continued 3 Bc4,
> threatening the oldest trap in the book, the "Scholar's Mate." If Black
> falls asleep, White plays 4 Qxf7 mate!.
>
> Nakamura's opponent, Grandmaster Krishnan Sasikiran of India, didn't
> snooze. He played 3 . . . g6 and eventually won in 87 moves.
>
> White's opening is so bizarre, it doesn't even have a name.
>
> Virtually every beginner's book warns against moving the queen early in
> the game, especially on the second move.
>
> The queen will inevitably be driven back when attacked by lesser pieces,
> as Nakamura's was by 3 . . . g6 4 Qf3 Nf6 5 Ne2 Bg7 6 Nbc3 d6 7 d3 Bg4.
>
> Yet below the highest levels in chess, the world championships, almost any
> opening can be tried.
>
> A database check shows that 2 Qh5 has been played more than 300 times in
> tournament chess since 1991, mainly in junior events — and has scored
> about 30 percent.
>
> Then again, 1 h3, has been played nearly 250 times over that period — and
> has done even better.




   
Date: 01 May 2005 19:13:34
From: -
Subject: Re: Nakamura Attack - Andy Soltis Comments !!

"Mike Vetto" <[email protected] > wrote:
> ... personally i dunt like the games of Hikaru Nakamura, they are
> not games you can say WOW! for. He plays like the conputer, boring
> moves, but with great positional & tactical advantage, but still boring.
> And a move you would expect for a person of that rating.


Evidently he has that rating. What is your rating, Mr. Vetto?
I'll remind everyone that these games are not about what thrills you
but about establishing their record of wins and losses. Get a life!





- regards
- jb

-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Empire Rising: A Satirical History
http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/horsey/empirerising/
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
David Horsey's 2003 Pulitzer Prize winners
http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/horsey/popup.asp?SubID=430&page=1 >itle=David%20Horsey%27s%202003%20Pulitzer%20Prize%20winners&css=%2Fhorsey%2Fbest%2Ecss
-----------------------------------------------------------------------



    
Date: 03 May 2005 18:05:16
From: Mike Vetto
Subject: Re: Nakamura Attack - Andy Soltis Comments !!
Idiot, its not about my rating. Gm's games are suppsoed to be masterful, and
when you go through the moves, you will say wow, i never thought of that.
This is not so with Hikaru, he plays typical moves, not stong moves like
those of Fischer and Morphy OR OTHER MOST GM'S. They only reason he has that
rating is because he PLAYED CHESS FOR 16 YEARS AND HES ONLY 18 NOW!!!!!!!
ALSO HE LSOT TO A 9 EYAR OLD. SAD. HE NEEDS TO GET A LIFE, AND IAM PRETTY
SURE HE WILL QUIT CHESS, THEY ALL DO!!! EX. FISCHER, WAITZKIN, MORPHY. CHILD
PLAYERS WILL ALWAYS LOSE INTEREST. ITS A KNOWN FACT. AND DUNT YOU DARE TELL
ME TO GET A LIFE, BECAUSE I HAVE ONE, AND I HATE PEOPLE LIKE YOU WHO MAKE
JUDGEMENTS WITH NO REASON AT ALL. PEOPLE LIKE YOU SHOULD BE HANGED UNTIL
YOUR HEAD COMES OFF FROM THE BODY!!!! I CAN HAVE MY OWN OPINIONS, MY OWN
REASONABLE OPINIONS. AND I NEVER THOUGHT OF CHESS AS WINS AND LOSES. THIS
EXPLAINS HOW IMMATURE YOU ARE, IF YOUR ONLY CONCERNED ABOUT THE RATING THEN
I FEEL SORRY FOR YOU BECAUSE YOUR MISSING THE WHOLE POINT OF PLAYING CHESS.
I COULD WRITE PAGES ON THIS, PLEASE DUNT MAKE ME, AND FINALLY LET ME ASK
YOU, WHY DO YOU PLAY CHESS?? AND DUNT TRY TO ANSWER IT IN A SIMPLE WAY LIKE,
OH! TIS FUN, IT HELPS YOU THINK, ETC. I WANT YOU TO THINK WHY YOU REALLY
PLAY CHESS. DO YOU KNOW WHY I PLAY CHESS, BECAUSE I ASPIRE TO BE ONE OF THE
CHAMPINOS, I WANT MY NAME IN NEWSPAPERS FORTHE GAME PLAY I DID, NOT FOR THE
WINS AND LOSSES. THAT IS WHY UNLIKE YOU, I PLAY CHESS EVERY MOMENT I CAN
SPARE. DO YOU KNOW HOW? IN MY MIND. THINK ABOUT IT. AND SO WITH THAT, I WANT
TO SAY, STOP WORRYING ABOUT ME, AND WORRY ABOUT YOURSELF. IT MIGHT HELP YOU
ON THE LONGRUN!!!!!




"-" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> "Mike Vetto" <[email protected]> wrote:
>> ... personally i dunt like the games of Hikaru Nakamura, they are
>> not games you can say WOW! for. He plays like the conputer, boring
>> moves, but with great positional & tactical advantage, but still boring.
>> And a move you would expect for a person of that rating.
>
>
> Evidently he has that rating. What is your rating, Mr. Vetto?
> I'll remind everyone that these games are not about what thrills you
> but about establishing their record of wins and losses. Get a life!
>
>
>
>
>
> - regards
> - jb
>
> -----------------------------------------------------------------------
> Empire Rising: A Satirical History
> http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/horsey/empirerising/
> -----------------------------------------------------------------------
> David Horsey's 2003 Pulitzer Prize winners
> http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/horsey/popup.asp?SubID=430&page=1>itle=David%20Horsey%27s%202003%20Pulitzer%20Prize%20winners&css=%2Fhorsey%2Fbest%2Ecss
> -----------------------------------------------------------------------
>




     
Date: 04 May 2005 06:13:27
From: -
Subject: Re: Nakamura Attack - Andy Soltis Comments !!

"Mike Vetto" <[email protected] > wrote:
> Idiot, its not about my rating. Gm's games are suppsoed to be masterful, and
> when you go through the moves, you will say wow, i never thought of that.


Nope. GMs just win enough of the right games to obtain a high GM rating.




> This is not so with Hikaru, he plays typical moves, not stong moves like
> those of Fischer and Morphy OR OTHER MOST GM'S. They only reason he has that
> rating is because he PLAYED CHESS FOR 16 YEARS AND HES ONLY 18 NOW!!!!!!!


How do you explain the fact that Hikaru Nakamura won enough of the
right stuff with his typical moves to obtain a highly deserved GM rating?




> ... I HATE PEOPLE LIKE YOU WHO MAKE JUDGEMENTS WITH NO REASON AT ALL.


What judgment was that? Has your -destiny- been affected in some way?




> I CAN HAVE MY OWN OPINIONS, MY OWN REASONABLE OPINIONS.


Which does not preclude others from supplying -appropriate- feedback.




> ... AND I NEVER THOUGHT OF CHESS AS WINS AND LOSES.


Hmmm. I wonder how you "calculate" a Chess Rating, then ...




> THIS EXPLAINS HOW IMMATURE YOU ARE, IF YOUR ONLY CONCERNED ABOUT
> THE RATING THEN I FEEL SORRY FOR YOU BECAUSE YOUR MISSING THE WHOLE
> POINT OF PLAYING CHESS.


Amateurs "play" at Chess. For the professionals it's a "job."




> I COULD WRITE PAGES ON THIS, PLEASE DUNT MAKE ME,


Are you kidding? Get to work and don't blame me if you're troll fodder.




> AND FINALLY LET ME ASK YOU, WHY DO YOU PLAY CHESS??


I like to watch them squirm, then I especially like to twist the knife
and watch them bleed on the board; then I produce anime films about it.




> ... I ASPIRE TO BE ONE OF THE CHAMPINOS, I WANT MY NAME IN NEWSPAPERS
> FORTHE GAME PLAY I DID, NOT FOR THE WINS AND LOSSES.


Well, you had better start "improving your rating" any day now...




> ... STOP WORRYING ABOUT ME, AND WORRY ABOUT YOURSELF.


Not worrying about you, but praying for you and just lit 13 candles.





- regards
- jb

-----------------------------------------------------------------------
War Without End
Re-run of Griffin 9/11 Talk on C-Span Sat 5/7
http://www.itszone.co.uk/zone0/viewtopic.php?t=34027
-----------------------------------------------------------------------



      
Date: 04 May 2005 06:47:53
From: Mike Vetto
Subject: Re: Nakamura Attack - Andy Soltis Comments !!
I just lit 14 candles. GOOD LUCK, iam outta here(troll group). Are you
depressed? Kids in my school actually sells Zantax. It was in the news ;-).
There is no reason to talk to you,talking to you is like talking to a deaf &
blind person, they dunt SEE or HEAR the facts but instead makes their own
rules for life. Hey, i hope you win a lot of games because you unfortunately
know what your doing, ahem, right!!! This is my last reply, do you know why,
BECASUE I HAVE A LIFE and i dunt have the time to chat to monkeys. Bye

"-" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> "Mike Vetto" <[email protected]> wrote:
>> Idiot, its not about my rating. Gm's games are suppsoed to be masterful,
>> and
>> when you go through the moves, you will say wow, i never thought of that.
>
>
> Nope. GMs just win enough of the right games to obtain a high GM
> rating.
>
>
>
>
>> This is not so with Hikaru, he plays typical moves, not stong moves like
>> those of Fischer and Morphy OR OTHER MOST GM'S. They only reason he has
>> that
>> rating is because he PLAYED CHESS FOR 16 YEARS AND HES ONLY 18 NOW!!!!!!!
>
>
> How do you explain the fact that Hikaru Nakamura won enough of
> the
> right stuff with his typical moves to obtain a highly deserved GM
> rating?
>
>
>
>
>> ... I HATE PEOPLE LIKE YOU WHO MAKE JUDGEMENTS WITH NO REASON AT ALL.
>
>
> What judgment was that? Has your -destiny- been affected in some way?
>
>
>
>
>> I CAN HAVE MY OWN OPINIONS, MY OWN REASONABLE OPINIONS.
>
>
> Which does not preclude others from supplying -appropriate- feedback.
>
>
>
>
>> ... AND I NEVER THOUGHT OF CHESS AS WINS AND LOSES.
>
>
> Hmmm. I wonder how you "calculate" a Chess Rating, then ...
>
>
>
>
>> THIS EXPLAINS HOW IMMATURE YOU ARE, IF YOUR ONLY CONCERNED ABOUT
>> THE RATING THEN I FEEL SORRY FOR YOU BECAUSE YOUR MISSING THE WHOLE
>> POINT OF PLAYING CHESS.
>
>
> Amateurs "play" at Chess. For the professionals it's a "job."
>
>
>
>
>> I COULD WRITE PAGES ON THIS, PLEASE DUNT MAKE ME,
>
>
> Are you kidding? Get to work and don't blame me if you're troll
> fodder.
>
>
>
>
>> AND FINALLY LET ME ASK YOU, WHY DO YOU PLAY CHESS??
>
>
> I like to watch them squirm, then I especially like to twist the knife
> and watch them bleed on the board; then I produce anime films about
> it.
>
>
>
>
>> ... I ASPIRE TO BE ONE OF THE CHAMPINOS, I WANT MY NAME IN NEWSPAPERS
>> FORTHE GAME PLAY I DID, NOT FOR THE WINS AND LOSSES.
>
>
> Well, you had better start "improving your rating" any day now...
>
>
>
>
>> ... STOP WORRYING ABOUT ME, AND WORRY ABOUT YOURSELF.
>
>
> Not worrying about you, but praying for you and just lit 13 candles.
>
>
>
>
>
> - regards
> - jb
>
> -----------------------------------------------------------------------
> War Without End
> Re-run of Griffin 9/11 Talk on C-Span Sat 5/7
> http://www.itszone.co.uk/zone0/viewtopic.php?t=34027
> -----------------------------------------------------------------------
>




       
Date: 04 May 2005 14:05:46
From: -
Subject: Re: Nakamura Attack - Andy Soltis Comments !!

"Mike Vetto" <[email protected] > wrote:
> I just lit 14 candles.


What a waste !




> Are you depressed? Kids in my school actually sells Zantax. [ ... ]


Not topical to the Subject: line. Stay on topic.




> There is no reason to talk to you,talking to you is like talking to a
> deaf & blind person, they dunt SEE or HEAR the facts but instead
> makes their own rules for life.


Lodge a complaint with the tournament director, then.




> Hey, i hope you win a lot of games because you unfortunately
> know what your doing, ahem, right!!!


I thought you said Chess wasn't about winning and losing.




> This is my last reply, do you know why, BECASUE I HAVE A LIFE and i dunt
> have the time to chat to monkeys. Bye. GOOD LUCK, iam outta here(troll group).


Be sure to slam the door on your way out...





- regards
- jb

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
INTERENET FILE SHARING SYSTEM ALLOWS WORLD ACCESS
TO YOUR COMPUTERIZED INCOME TAX RETURNS
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2005/05/03/eveningnews/main692765.shtml
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



        
Date: 04 May 2005 17:56:39
From: Mike Vetto
Subject: Re: Nakamura Attack - Andy Soltis Comments !!

"-" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> "Mike Vetto" <[email protected]> wrote:
>> I just lit 14 candles.
>
>
> What a waste !
>

-----i hope your not talking about yourself


>
>
>> Are you depressed? Kids in my school actually sells Zantax. [ ... ]
>
>
> Not topical to the Subject: line. Stay on topic.
>
---------i will decide on the topic

>
>
>> There is no reason to talk to you,talking to you is like talking to a
>> deaf & blind person, they dunt SEE or HEAR the facts but instead
>> makes their own rules for life.
>
>
> Lodge a complaint with the tournament director, then.
>

------Do you understand ENGLISH? its called metaphor


>
>
>> Hey, i hope you win a lot of games because you unfortunately
>> know what your doing, ahem, right!!!
>
>
> I thought you said Chess wasn't about winning and losing.
>
-------i was talking to you. You think chess is all about winning, thus i
hope you win a lot of games, read before replying
>
>
>> This is my last reply, do you know why, BECASUE I HAVE A LIFE and i dunt
>> have the time to chat to monkeys. Bye. GOOD LUCK, iam outta here(troll
>> group).
>
>
> Be sure to slam the door on your way out...
>
>
---------if you live in the NYC area, i challenge to you a match. First to
win 7 games. Get Sam to set it up. i will even play you blindfolded. I will
even set the price amount of 500$ for the winner, if your also willing to
put up that much stake. Please do reply, i cant wait to meet you.
>
>
> -
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
> INTERENET FILE SHARING SYSTEM ALLOWS WORLD ACCESS
> TO YOUR COMPUTERIZED INCOME TAX RETURNS
> http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2005/05/03/eveningnews/main692765.shtml
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
>




         
Date: 05 May 2005 05:24:38
From: -
Subject: Re: Nakamura Attack - Andy Soltis Comments !!

>> "Mike Vetto" <[email protected]> wrote:
>>> I just lit 14 candles.

> "-" <[email protected]> wrote:
>> What a waste !

"Mike Vetto" <[email protected] > wrote:
> -----i hope your not talking about yourself


I think my rek was about candles.



>>> Are you depressed? Kids in my school actually sells Zantax. [ ... ]

>> Not topical to the Subject: line. Stay on topic.

> ---------i will decide on the topic


When?



>>> There is no reason to talk to you,talking to you is like talking to a
>>> deaf & blind person, they dunt SEE or HEAR the facts but instead
>>> makes their own rules for life.

>> Lodge a complaint with the tournament director, then.

> ------Do you understand ENGLISH? its called metaphor


Metaphor of what for what?



>>> Hey, i hope you win a lot of games because you unfortunately
>>> know what your doing, ahem, right!!!

>> I thought you said Chess wasn't about winning and losing.

> -------i was talking to you. You think chess is all about winning,
> thus i hope you win a lot of games, read before replying


No, I said these games were about establishing their record of
wins and losses. A -different- interpretation entirely.




> ---------if you live in the NYC area, i challenge to you a match. First to
> win 7 games. Get Sam to set it up. i will even play you blindfolded. I
> will even set the price amount of 500$ for the winner, if your also willing
> to put up that much stake. Please do reply, i cant wait to meet you.


From: "Mike Vetto" <[email protected] >
Date: Tue, 3 May 2005 18:05:16 -0400
[ ... ]

I NEVER THOUGHT OF CHESS AS WINS AND LOSES.
THIS EXPLAINS HOW IMMATURE YOU ARE, [ ... ]

I WANT MY NAME IN NEWSPAPERS FORTHE GAME PLAY I DID,
NOT FOR THE WINS AND LOSSES.
[ ... ]





- regards
- jb

------------------------------------------------------------------------
CIA agents told to deliver bin Laden's head on ice
http://reuters.myway.com/article/20050504/2005-05-04T225601Z_01_N04302534_RTRIDST_0_NEWS-SECURITY-BINLADEN-DC.html
------------------------------------------------------------------------



          
Date: 05 May 2005 06:57:47
From: Mike Vetto
Subject: Re: Nakamura Attack - Andy Soltis Comments !!
okayyou know what, there no point talking to you, because all you do is sit
infront of the computer with you bag of chips and talk smack, yu cant even
play chess. You need to get a life And most likely lose some fat. Now i
gotta a life, and this is my last reply and iam unsubcribing from the group,
there no reason to join this group anyway. stop talking smack and why dunt
you play me in chess boy? Later. I hope i never see you or talk to you
again.




 
Date: 30 Apr 2005 21:48:11
From: The Historian
Subject: Re: Nakamura Attack

Randy Bauer wrote:
> In article <[email protected]>, Goran Tomic says...
> >
> >"Sam Sloan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> >news:[email protected]
> >> For centuries it has been an opening that every chess player knows
> >> about and has played against, but has never had a name.
> >>
> >> Now, it has a name. Before, it was just the Patzer Opening.
Everybody
> >> knew what that was, but that was not an official name.
> >>
> >> This solves a problem for me because for years I have had a
problem
> >> trying to explain to my students why this opening was no good.
Yet, I
> >> could not demonstrate a refutation.
> >>
> >> Now we know that there is no refutation. It is an opening played
by a
> >> top grandmaster.
> >>
> >> It is the Nakamura Attack, and without even an official naming
> >> ceremony, every active chess player in the world already knows
what it
> >> is. It is the opening 1. e4 e5 2. Qh5 !!!!
> >>
> >> Sam Sloan
> >
> >I just played a game with "coctel".
> >
> >[Event "Ajedrez21"]
> >[Site "www.ajedrez21.com"]
> >[Date "2005.4.30"]
> >[White "rocky5 (Goran Tomic, Yugoslavia)"]
> >[Black "coctel"]
> >[Result "1-0"]
> >[WhiteElo "2439"]
> >[BlackElo "2035"]
> >[TimeControl "2/0"]
> >
> >1. e2-e4 e7-e5 2. Qd1-h5 Nb8-c6 3. Bf1-c4 Ng8-f6 4. Qh5xf7 1-0
>
> Brilliant! Nobody could have seen that attack coming.
>
> Have you submitted the game to the Informant? I look forward to
reading your
> notes to this Titantic struggle.
>
> Randy Bauer

I'd always suspected that Goran the Moron was a weak player. Now we
have proof. In the words of the immortal Internet GM Loyd Turton, "he
is so crap".



 
Date: 30 Apr 2005 13:35:19
From: Taylor Kingston
Subject: Re: Nakamura Attack
Goran Tomic wrote:
> I just played a game with "coctel".
>
> [Event "Ajedrez21"]
> [Site "www.ajedrez21.com"]
> [Date "2005.4.30"]
> [White "rocky5 (Goran Tomic, Yugoslavia)"]
> [Black "coctel"]
> [Result "1-0"]
> [WhiteElo "2439"]
> [BlackElo "2035"]
> [TimeControl "2/0"]
>
> 1. e2-e4 e7-e5 2. Qd1-h5 Nb8-c6 3. Bf1-c4 Ng8-f6 4. Qh5xf7 1-0

This makes Abbot & Costello look like Anderssen and Morphy.



 
Date: 30 Apr 2005 22:23:53
From: Goran Tomic
Subject: Re: Nakamura Attack
"Sam Sloan" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> For centuries it has been an opening that every chess player knows
> about and has played against, but has never had a name.
>
> Now, it has a name. Before, it was just the Patzer Opening. Everybody
> knew what that was, but that was not an official name.
>
> This solves a problem for me because for years I have had a problem
> trying to explain to my students why this opening was no good. Yet, I
> could not demonstrate a refutation.
>
> Now we know that there is no refutation. It is an opening played by a
> top grandmaster.
>
> It is the Nakamura Attack, and without even an official naming
> ceremony, every active chess player in the world already knows what it
> is. It is the opening 1. e4 e5 2. Qh5 !!!!
>
> Sam Sloan

I just played a game with "coctel".

[Event "Ajedrez21"]
[Site "www.ajedrez21.com"]
[Date "2005.4.30"]
[White "rocky5 (Goran Tomic, Yugoslavia)"]
[Black "coctel"]
[Result "1-0"]
[WhiteElo "2439"]
[BlackElo "2035"]
[TimeControl "2/0"]

1. e2-e4 e7-e5 2. Qd1-h5 Nb8-c6 3. Bf1-c4 Ng8-f6 4. Qh5xf7 1-0




  
Date: 30 Apr 2005 20:04:08
From: Randy Bauer
Subject: Re: Nakamura Attack
In article <[email protected] >, Goran Tomic says...
>
>"Sam Sloan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>news:[email protected]
>> For centuries it has been an opening that every chess player knows
>> about and has played against, but has never had a name.
>>
>> Now, it has a name. Before, it was just the Patzer Opening. Everybody
>> knew what that was, but that was not an official name.
>>
>> This solves a problem for me because for years I have had a problem
>> trying to explain to my students why this opening was no good. Yet, I
>> could not demonstrate a refutation.
>>
>> Now we know that there is no refutation. It is an opening played by a
>> top grandmaster.
>>
>> It is the Nakamura Attack, and without even an official naming
>> ceremony, every active chess player in the world already knows what it
>> is. It is the opening 1. e4 e5 2. Qh5 !!!!
>>
>> Sam Sloan
>
>I just played a game with "coctel".
>
>[Event "Ajedrez21"]
>[Site "www.ajedrez21.com"]
>[Date "2005.4.30"]
>[White "rocky5 (Goran Tomic, Yugoslavia)"]
>[Black "coctel"]
>[Result "1-0"]
>[WhiteElo "2439"]
>[BlackElo "2035"]
>[TimeControl "2/0"]
>
>1. e2-e4 e7-e5 2. Qd1-h5 Nb8-c6 3. Bf1-c4 Ng8-f6 4. Qh5xf7 1-0

Brilliant! Nobody could have seen that attack coming.

Have you submitted the game to the Informant? I look forward to reading your
notes to this Titantic struggle.

Randy Bauer
>
>



  
Date: 30 Apr 2005 16:56:59
From: Mike Vetto
Subject: Re: Nakamura Attack
Goran, thats basic, and the person who played you is not very good or even
over 2000 in rating. BTW, did you play speed chess or something? Bye


"Goran Tomic" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> "Sam Sloan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>> For centuries it has been an opening that every chess player knows
>> about and has played against, but has never had a name.
>>
>> Now, it has a name. Before, it was just the Patzer Opening. Everybody
>> knew what that was, but that was not an official name.
>>
>> This solves a problem for me because for years I have had a problem
>> trying to explain to my students why this opening was no good. Yet, I
>> could not demonstrate a refutation.
>>
>> Now we know that there is no refutation. It is an opening played by a
>> top grandmaster.
>>
>> It is the Nakamura Attack, and without even an official naming
>> ceremony, every active chess player in the world already knows what it
>> is. It is the opening 1. e4 e5 2. Qh5 !!!!
>>
>> Sam Sloan
>
> I just played a game with "coctel".
>
> [Event "Ajedrez21"]
> [Site "www.ajedrez21.com"]
> [Date "2005.4.30"]
> [White "rocky5 (Goran Tomic, Yugoslavia)"]
> [Black "coctel"]
> [Result "1-0"]
> [WhiteElo "2439"]
> [BlackElo "2035"]
> [TimeControl "2/0"]
>
> 1. e2-e4 e7-e5 2. Qd1-h5 Nb8-c6 3. Bf1-c4 Ng8-f6 4. Qh5xf7 1-0
>




   
Date: 01 May 2005 08:13:44
From: Goran Tomic
Subject: Re: Nakamura Attack
"Mike Vetto" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Goran, thats basic, and the person who played you is not very good or even
> over 2000 in rating. BTW, did you play speed chess or something? Bye

> [TimeControl "2/0"]

Regards,
Goran Tomic




 
Date: 30 Apr 2005 09:31:53
From: Taylor Kingston
Subject: Re: Nakamura Attack
Sam Sloan wrote:
> Is this Zimmermann the same person who sent the Zimmermann Telegram?

Why don't you try doing some actual research, and maybe you will find
out? I am reliably informed, for example, that New York has several
fine libraries where much information is stored; you may be able to
find something relevant there. This is of course a more difficult
technique than repeating hearsay or resorting to fabrication, but it
usually yields more factual results.



 
Date: 29 Apr 2005 17:27:53
From:
Subject: Re: Nakamura Attack
Why not the Boris Becker Attack? Tennis ace Becker used 1 e4 e5 2 Qh5
live on CNN a few years back against none other than Garry Kasparov!



  
Date: 30 Apr 2005 05:01:51
From: Ray Gordon
Subject: Re: Nakamura Attack
> Why not the Boris Becker Attack? Tennis ace Becker used 1 e4 e5 2 Qh5
> live on CNN a few years back against none other than Garry Kasparov!

Isn't that the David Letterman attack from their telephone game on his show
from the 1980s?


--
Ray Gordon, Author
http://www.cybersheet.com/easy.html
Seduction Made Easy. Get this book FREE when you buy participating
affiliated books!

http://www.cybersheet.com/library.html
The Seduction Library. Four free books to get you started on your quest to
get laid.

Don't buy anything from experts who won't debate on a free speech forum.




 
Date: 29 Apr 2005 12:59:04
From: Mike Vetto
Subject: Re: Nakamura Attack
Sam,
If the genius P. Morphy was still around during these stupid moves like
Qh5, he will literelly crush the grandmaster who plays theseinto pieces. And
i can guareentee that, that GM will never play that move again. Bye




 
Date: 29 Apr 2005 05:38:52
From: Taylor Kingston
Subject: Re: Nakamura Attack

Sam Sloan wrote:
> New names for openings usually come from the names of famous players.
> I believe that shall only played the shall Gambit one time, but
> that was in a famous game against Capablanca.

One of many erroneous Sloan beliefs. He played it at least one other
time, against J.S. Morrison, at the same tournament, New York 1918, and
won.

> Alekhine played the Alekhine Defense in Pasadena 1932.

True, against Samuel Factor, but that was not the first time he used
the line. The first known instance was in a consultation game,
Donegan/Mueller/Zimmerman-Alekhine, Zurich, 27 August 1921 (0-1, 33).
His first use of it in a master tournament was Saemisch-Alekhine,
Budapest 1921 (10 September, =BD-=BD, 24). In the same event he also
played it against Endre Steiner, 15 September (0-1, 53). The latter has
sometimes been erroneously reported as the only time Alekhine ever
played Alekhine's Defense. His last known use of the line was
Milner-Barry - Alekhine, Hastings 1933-34 (2 January 1934, 0-1, 58).
=20
Taylor Kingston



  
Date: 30 Apr 2005 16:11:04
From: Sam Sloan
Subject: Re: Nakamura Attack
On 29 Apr 2005 05:38:52 -0700, "Taylor Kingston"
<[email protected] > wrote:


> True, against Samuel Factor, but that was not the first time he used
>the line. The first known instance was in a consultation game,
>Donegan/Mueller/Zimmerman-Alekhine, Zurich, 27 August 1921 (0-1, 33).

> Taylor Kingston

Is this Zimmermann the same person who sent the Zimmermann Telegram?

Sam Sloan


 
Date: 29 Apr 2005 04:07:27
From: The Historian
Subject: Convicted Felon Sam Sloan on McCutcheon

Sam Sloan wrote:

Snip spewing from a convicted felon/kidnapper.

> Among modernly named openings, the MacCutcheon Variation was nasmed
(sic)
> after a patzer named MacCutcheon who played it in a simultaneous
> exhibition against Steinitz.

His name was John L. McCutcheon, not "MacCutcheon". As for his playing
strength, McCutcheon defeated Lasker in a correspondence game.



 
Date: 28 Apr 2005 23:48:43
From: Mr. Onigiri
Subject: Re: Nakamura Attack
don't call sloan a fool he is my hero



 
Date: 28 Apr 2005 19:26:41
From: Ray Gordon
Subject: Re: Nakamura Attack
> For centuries it has been an opening that every chess player knows
> about and has played against, but has never had a name.
>
> Now, it has a name. Before, it was just the Patzer Opening. Everybody
> knew what that was, but that was not an official name.
>
> This solves a problem for me because for years I have had a problem
> trying to explain to my students why this opening was no good. Yet, I
> could not demonstrate a refutation.
>
> Now we know that there is no refutation. It is an opening played by a
> top grandmaster.
>
> It is the Nakamura Attack, and without even an official naming
> ceremony, every active chess player in the world already knows what it
> is. It is the opening 1. e4 e5 2. Qh5 !!!!

2...Nc6 =/+





  
Date: 28 Apr 2005 15:35:47
From: Orne Batmagoo
Subject: Re: Nakamura Attack
Please remove rec.games.go from the list of newsgroups if you are going
to post in this thread.

Sam Sloan shouldn't have posted there originally, either, but I reckon
there's nothing that can be done about that.

Ray Gordon wrote:

>>For centuries it has been an opening that every chess player knows
>>about and has played against, but has never had a name.
>>
>>Now, it has a name. Before, it was just the Patzer Opening. Everybody
>>knew what that was, but that was not an official name.
>>
>>This solves a problem for me because for years I have had a problem
>>trying to explain to my students why this opening was no good. Yet, I
>>could not demonstrate a refutation.
>>
>>Now we know that there is no refutation. It is an opening played by a
>>top grandmaster.
>>
>>It is the Nakamura Attack, and without even an official naming
>>ceremony, every active chess player in the world already knows what it
>>is. It is the opening 1. e4 e5 2. Qh5 !!!!
>
>
> 2...Nc6 =/+
>
>
>



 
Date: 28 Apr 2005 19:15:00
From: Sam Sloan
Subject: Re: Nakamura Attack
At 10:54 AM 4/28/2005 -0700, Bradley Zang wrote:
> Hi Sam
> I do understand guys like shal got his name on an opening he invented and lost at. (Like that famous game against Capablanca.)
> But doesn't the guy have to win many games or do well in a tournament or contribute to the theory with such a very well known old opening before it is named after him.
I mean why not call it the Adov after the game in 1889
> [Event "?"]
>[Site "St Petersburg"]
>[Date "1889.??.??"]
>[White "Adov"]
>[Black "Borisov"]
>[Round "?"]
>[Result "0-1"]
>[ECO "C20"] 1. e4 e5 2. Qh5 Nc6 3. Bc4 g6 4. Qf3 Nf6 5. Qb3
>Nd4 6. Qc3 d5 7. Bxd5 Nxd5 8. exd5 Bf5 9. d3
> 0-1 Also I've seen it named the Queen Attack.
>Isn't there a master name Rouleau who plays it and wins.
>Brad

This is a very interesting subject about which many articles have been
written, especially by Andy Soltis in Chess Life. The question is: How
do Openings Get Their Names?

I am far from an expert on this but I believe that the two oldest
opening names are the Sicilian Defense and the Guioco Piano. Both
names were provided by Greco in about 1630 I believe.

The Ruy Lopez was a known opening in 1560 but that name for it is
fairly modern.

Among modernly named openings, the MacCutcheon Variation was nasmed
after a patzer named MacCutcheon who played it in a simultaneous
exhibition against Steinitz.

New names for openings usually come from the names of famous players.
I believe that shall only played the shall Gambit one time, but
that was in a famous game against Capablanca.

Alekhine played the Alekhine Defense in Pasadena 1932.

Benko clearly invented the Benko Gambit. Nobody played the Benko
Gambit before Benko did, yet the Soviets refused to call it that,
perhaps because Benko was a defector, so they called it the Volga
Gambitr.

I have a personal beef. I do not like it when anybody calls 1. g4 the
Basman Attack because I taught Basman how to play this opening when I
stayed for two days at his home in Southern England in February 1978.
Before I taught Basman how to play it, he thought it lost by force.
However, Basman is an International Master and a famous player and
author, so the opening is often named after him. Usually to have an
opening named after yourself you have to be a famous player.

I am convinced that the opening 1. e4 e5 2. Qh5 will forever after be
known as the Nakamura Attack. Undoubtedly there is some name for it
already, but nobody knows what it is. Nakamura is a strong and famous
grandmaster, and there is no other likely name, so that will be it.

Sam Sloan


  
Date: 29 Apr 2005 08:06:02
From: Jürgen R.
Subject: Re: Nakamura Attack
On Thu, 28 Apr 2005 19:15:00 GMT, [email protected] (Sam Sloan)
wrote:

>At 10:54 AM 4/28/2005 -0700, Bradley Zang wrote:
>> Hi Sam
>> I do understand guys like shal got his name on an opening he invented and lost at. (Like that famous game against Capablanca.)
>> But doesn't the guy have to win many games or do well in a tournament or contribute to the theory with such a very well known old opening before it is named after him.
>I mean why not call it the Adov after the game in 1889
>> [Event "?"]
>>[Site "St Petersburg"]
>>[Date "1889.??.??"]
>>[White "Adov"]
>>[Black "Borisov"]
>>[Round "?"]
>>[Result "0-1"]
>>[ECO "C20"] 1. e4 e5 2. Qh5 Nc6 3. Bc4 g6 4. Qf3 Nf6 5. Qb3
>>Nd4 6. Qc3 d5 7. Bxd5 Nxd5 8. exd5 Bf5 9. d3
>> 0-1 Also I've seen it named the Queen Attack.
>>Isn't there a master name Rouleau who plays it and wins.
>>Brad
>
>This is a very interesting subject about which many articles have been
>written, especially by Andy Soltis in Chess Life. The question is: How
>do Openings Get Their Names?
>
>I am far from an expert on this but I believe that the two oldest
>opening names are the Sicilian Defense and the Guioco Piano. Both
>names were provided by Greco in about 1630 I believe.
>
>The Ruy Lopez was a known opening in 1560 but that name for it is
>fairly modern.
>
>Among modernly named openings, the MacCutcheon Variation was nasmed
>after a patzer named MacCutcheon who played it in a simultaneous
>exhibition against Steinitz.
>
>New names for openings usually come from the names of famous players.
>I believe that shall only played the shall Gambit one time, but
>that was in a famous game against Capablanca.
>
>Alekhine played the Alekhine Defense in Pasadena 1932.
>
>Benko clearly invented the Benko Gambit. Nobody played the Benko
>Gambit before Benko did, yet the Soviets refused to call it that,
>perhaps because Benko was a defector, so they called it the Volga
>Gambitr.
>
>I have a personal beef. I do not like it when anybody calls 1. g4 the
>Basman Attack because I taught Basman how to play this opening when I
>stayed for two days at his home in Southern England in February 1978.
>Before I taught Basman how to play it, he thought it lost by force.
>However, Basman is an International Master and a famous player and
>author, so the opening is often named after him. Usually to have an
>opening named after yourself you have to be a famous player.
>
>I am convinced that the opening 1. e4 e5 2. Qh5 will forever after be
>known as the Nakamura Attack. Undoubtedly there is some name for it
>already, but nobody knows what it is. Nakamura is a strong and famous
>grandmaster, and there is no other likely name, so that will be it.
>
>Sam Sloan

Sloan, you are a fool.

In the days of Google anyone can instantly look up questionable
assertions made by pseudo-authorities such as you.

Strange that this doesn't keep you from peddling your collection of
half-truths as fact.

For example, Google gives zero hits on "Basman attack". This silly
opening is reasonably widely known as Grob's attack. It is used by
Patzers to exploit the fact that other Patzers are unprepared for it.

Henry Grob was a minor Swiss Chess master and writer who managed to
attach his name to the opening.

For the Wolga-Gambit it is easy to find the reference
Rubinstein-Spielmann, Vienna 1922. Benkö was born in 1928. A number of
Russian players analyzed this opening in the 1950's and gave it the
name Wolga-Gambit.

Incidentally, look up Clyde Nakamura, who believed he had invented a
new gambit, namely 1.d4 Nf6 2.g4...



   
Date: 29 Apr 2005 12:13:51
From: Sam Sloan
Subject: Re: Nakamura Attack
On Fri, 29 Apr 2005 08:06:02 +0200, Jürgen R. <[email protected] > wrote:

>On Thu, 28 Apr 2005 19:15:00 GMT, [email protected] (Sam Sloan)
>wrote:

>>Benko clearly invented the Benko Gambit. Nobody played the Benko
>>Gambit before Benko did, yet the Soviets refused to call it that,
>>perhaps because Benko was a defector, so they called it the Volga
>>Gambit.

>> Sam Sloan

>For the Wolga-Gambit it is easy to find the reference
>Rubinstein-Spielmann, Vienna 1922. Benkö was born in 1928. A number of
>Russian players analyzed this opening in the 1950's and gave it the
>name Wolga-Gambit.

Unfortunately, Jurgen, who used to be a truth-teller, has picked up
Taylor Kingston's habit of lying all the time.

The game Rubenstein-Spielmann was by no stretch a Benko Gambit. It was
not even a gambit at all. Spielmann never sacrificed or offered a
pawn. Rather, it was Rubinstein who sacrificed a pawn.

Here is the game. Look at the moves. There is no gambit pawn at all.

In fact, there is no game ever in the history of chess where the Benko
Gambit was played before Benko played it. There were a few games where
the move b5 was played sacrificing a pawn but that was already later
in the game, never on move 3.

Here is the Rubinstein-Spielmann Game. You will see that there is no
pawn sacrifice:

[Event "?"]
[Site "Vienna"]
[Date "1922.??.??"]
[White "Rubinstein,Akiba "]
[Black "Spielmann,Rudolf "]
[Result "1-0"]
[ECO "A46"]
[Round "12"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 c5 3. d5 b5 4. c4 Bb7 5. a4 bxc4 6. Nc3 e6 7. e4 Nxe4

8. Nxe4 exd5 9. Nc3 d4 10. Bxc4 dxc3 11. Bxf7+ Kxf7 12. Qb3+ c4 13.
Ne5+ Kg8 14. Qxb7 Nc6
15. Nxc6 Qe8+ 16. Be3 cxb2 17. Qxb2 dxc6 18. O-O Bd6 19. Qc3 Qe6 20.
Rac1 Kf7 21. Rfe1 Rhe8
22. Bf4 Qg6 23. Qxc4+ Kf8 24. Bxd6+ Qxd6 25. Re3 Qd5 26. Qxc6 Qxc6 27.
Rxc6 Red8 28. g3 Rd7
29. a5 Rb8 30. h4 Rb5 31. a6 Ra5 32. Kg2 Ra2 33. h5 Ra5 34. h6 gxh6
35. Rxh6 Kg7
36. Rc6 Rf5 37. Rec3 Rff7 38. f4 Rfe7 39. Kh3 Rf7 40. R3c5 Kf8 41. Kh4
Kg7 42. Rb5 Kf8
43. f5 Rfe7 44. g4 Kf7 45. Kh5 Re1 46. Kg5 Ree7 47. Rb8 1-0

I would like to remind you of a quote from Jurgen himself, posted on
Sep 8 2004, 3:02 pm:

"Sam Sloan is nearly always right; the trouble is that his insights
are so deep, and so far ahead of the time, that they appear incredible
to the educated layman. I myself have occasionally made the mistake of
thinking that Sam Sloan had made an error. Invariably, sometimes a
year or more later, I had to admit my mistake."

"Jurgen R."


   
Date: 29 Apr 2005 06:56:09
From: TLOlczyk
Subject: Re: Nakamura Attack
On Fri, 29 Apr 2005 08:06:02 +0200, Jürgen R. <[email protected] > wrote:

>
>Sloan, you are a fool.
Yes he is a fool and and an asshole.
Those responding are even bigger fools.
None of this has anything to do with Go ( I am posting from
rec.games.go ), or Japanese society. So why is he posting to
soc.culture.japan and rec.games.go.

So all of you who try to use a small bit of the shit you call a
brain, remove these two groups when following up.




The reply-to email address is [email protected]
This is an address I ignore.
To reply via email, remove 2002 and change yahoo to
interaccess,

**
Thaddeus L. Olczyk, PhD

There is a difference between
*thinking* you know something,
and *knowing* you know something.


    
Date: 29 Apr 2005 18:46:00
From: -
Subject: Re: Nakamura Attack

> Jürgen R. <[email protected]> wrote:
>> Sloan, you are a fool.

TLOlczyk ("piled higher & deeper" killfiler) <[email protected] > wrote:
> Yes he is a fool and and an asshole.


This kind of language has no place on rec.games.go.southpark.




> Those responding are even bigger fools.


Lead the way, then...




> None of this has anything to do with Go ( I am posting from
> rec.games.go ), or Japanese society. So why is he posting to
> soc.culture.japan and rec.games.go.


Ask yourself and maybe you'll f**k the answer.




TLOlczyk <[email protected] > wrote:
> So all of you who try to use a small bit of the shit you call a
> brain, remove these two groups when following up.


Ok, they've put it into your in-box.




> Thaddeus L. Olczyk, PhD


In what? From where?




> There is a difference between
> *thinking* you know something,
> and *knowing* you know something.


Explain. Use detail. Comply or be regurgitated.




- regards
- jb

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