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Date: 08 Apr 2005 07:02:25
From:
Subject: R+B vs R
I'm looking for advise on the general approach and what to watch out
for in this type of endgame. White has King and Rook and Bishop.
Black has only King and Rook. Surely white can checkmate but must
watch out for the draw when rooks are exchanged. Thanks.





 
Date: 17 Apr 2005 13:15:18
From: bellatori
Subject: Re: R+B vs R
This is a well documented ending which can be found in the Nalimov
tablebases. Most positions are drawn except for the Philidor (mentioned
already) and some analysis by Lolli both several hundred years ago!! In
practice the 50 move rule ensures that most endings of this type OTB are
agreed draws. You cannot force the Philidor position therefore forcing a
win is unlikely. Batsford chess endings gives a good review of all endings
as a start....

Bellatori



  
Date: 18 Apr 2005 09:15:13
From: Few Good Chessmen
Subject: Re: R+B vs R
"bellatori" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected].
> This is a well documented ending which can be found in the Nalimov
> tablebases. Most positions are drawn except for the Philidor (mentioned
> already) and some analysis by Lolli both several hundred years ago!! In
> practice the 50 move rule ensures that most endings of this type OTB are
> agreed draws. You cannot force the Philidor position therefore forcing a
> win is unlikely. Batsford chess endings gives a good review of all endings
> as a start....

To reach any R+B vs R Position but Drawn by the inferior side (first to
move) I'd said the superior lost the game morally (lost a R+B vs R Game is
acceptable but just a few more it will raise doubt on the player's skill).
So how do you attain The Right to Move First in a R+B vs B Position (surely
not by luck)? The 50 Moves Rule was not in forced during Philidor or Lolli
times but the good Old GMasters knew the Chess Ending well...




 
Date: 08 Apr 2005 18:07:03
From: Henri Arsenault
Subject: Re: R+B vs R
In article <[email protected] >,
[email protected] wrote:

>I'm looking for advise on the general approach and what to watch out
>for in this type of endgame. White has King and Rook and Bishop.
>Black has only King and Rook. Surely white can checkmate but must
>watch out for the draw when rooks are exchanged. Thanks.

Offhand, White must be careful about being forced to exchange the rook,
because a Bishop alone cannot mate. I am not even sure that it is possible
with R_B against B woithout pawns...

Henri


 
Date: 08 Apr 2005 10:54:17
From:
Subject: Re: R+B vs R
I am sure the computers have figured this ending out by now, but Pal
Benko used to call it the "headache ending" because of its difficulty.
In practical play, the ending is most often drawn because of the 50
move rule. There are some winning positions, the most famous of which
may be the Philidor position: White King on d6, Bishop on d5, Rook on
f1, Black King on d8, Rook on e7. The two keys to the position are
that Black's King is trapped on the back rank and that the White Bishop
is positioned in a way that both confines the Black pieces and protects
the White King. White starts by taking the 7th. 1.Rf8+ Re8 2.Rf7 Re2.
The next step is to force the Black Rook to the third rank. 3.Rg7
Re1 4.Rb7 Rc1 5.Bb3 Rc3. Now White re-centralizes the Bishop on d5
where it takes the f3 square away from the Black Rook (that's why the
Black Rook needs to be on the third rank). On d5, the Bishop also
controls the key squares, b7 and f7, keeping the Black King from
escaping from the back rank. 6.Be6 Rd3+ 7.Bd5 Rc3 8.Rd7+ Kc8 This
is forced, since if 8..Ke8, 9. Rg7 and mates. The respite, however, is
only temporary, as White can still set up the back-ranker with some
careful maeuvering: 9.Rf7 Kb8 10.Rb7+ Kc8 11.Rb4 Kd8 12.Bc4 Kc8
13.Be6+ Kd8 14. Rb8 and mates.

Hope this helps,
Richard Stanz