Main
Date: 18 Oct 2008 06:44:35
From:
Subject: Anand-Kramnik real-time coverage
The Anand-Kramnik games can be followed in real time here:

http://www.chesscafe.com/wc2008/client.html

A game is in progress at this moment (9:43 AM USA Eastern time,
Saturday 18 October 2008).




 
Date: 19 Oct 2008 05:54:57
From: Offramp
Subject: Re: Anand-Kramnik real-time coverage
On Oct 18, 2:44 pm, [email protected] wrote:
> The Anand-Kramnik games can be followed in real time here:
>
> http://www.chesscafe.com/wc2008/client.html
>
> A game is in progress at this moment (9:43 AM USA Eastern time,
> Saturday 18 October 2008).

That's really good. It's a new game viewer that I haven't seen before.
Thank you TK
Alan


 
Date: 18 Oct 2008 09:57:13
From:
Subject: Re: Anand-Kramnik real-time coverage
On Oct 18, 11:28=A0am, "Chess One" <[email protected] > wrote:
> Quite interesting commentary from those who can't do real-time. Notes are
> are by Susan Polgar. Phil Innes
>
> [Event "2008 World Championship"]
> [Site "Bonn"]
> [Date "2008.10.18"]
> [Round "4"]
> [White "Anand, V"]
> [Black "Kramnik, V"]
> [ECO "D37"]
> [White Elo "2783"]
> [Black Elo "2772"]
>
> 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. Nc3 Be7 5. Bf4 O-O 6. e3 Nbd7 7. a3 c5 8.
> cxd5 Nxd5 9. Nxd5 exd5 10. dxc5 Nxc5 11.Be5 The players cranked out the
> first 11 moves at rapid pace. These are all book moves so far. I believe =
the
> most popular option for Black here is 11...Bf6. There are also many other
> playable moves such as 11...Bf5, 11...Bg4, 11...Be6, or 11... f6. I do no=
t
> expect Black to go all out in this game because of a few reasons: 1. He i=
s
> very experienced and he will not panic after just one loss. 2. One of the
> common strategies in big matches is you want to try to stabilize the
> bleeding after a bad loss. Tomorrow would be an off day and Kramnik can t=
hen
> prepare to even up the score with the White pieces in game 5.
>
> 11...Bf5 This is not the most common continuation but definitely playable=
.
> White's most logical response here would be 12.Be2. This position is roug=
hly
> even.
>
> 12. Be2 Bf6 White has a number of choices such as 13.0-0, 13.Rc1, or
> 13.Bxf6, which most likely will be Anand's choice. Black is equal in any =
of
> the above lines. I am having a hard time finding a convincing plan for
> White. This opening choice suits Kramnik fine as he will try to grind thi=
ngs
> out without much risks. 12...Bf6 is technically a new move here but it
> really just transpose to another line.
>
> 13.Bxf6 Qxf6 =A0If Anand wants a quiet game, 14.Nd4 would be a logical ch=
oice.
> But if he wants something more lively, he may want to consider 14.0-0
> allowing 14...Qxb2 15 .Qxd5
>
> 14.Nd4 =A0I do not expect much happening in this game. It seems that Anan=
d is
> content with a +1 so far. Even if Kramnik can even up the score by the en=
d
> of the match, I =A0have to believe that Anand is quite confident with his
> rapid chess skill. They have played 45 rapid games against each other and
> Anand has a big edge with +10 =3D33 -2 . One interesting note, Kramnik ha=
s
> never beaten Anand with the Black pieces in classical chess.
>
> 14...Ne6 I expect Anand to capture the Bishop and head to a Bishop versus
> Knight set up. After 0-0, White has nothing to fear and his focus will be=
on
> the isolated d5 pawn. I still believe the position is even.
>
> 15.Nxf5 Qxf5 16.O-O =A0Things move along as expected. Black now can place=
his
> f Rook on d8 threatening d4 to get rid of that isolated pawn. In the mean
> time, White can always play Bg4 to get rid of the Knight. This is certain=
ly
> not an exciting position for either side.
>
> 16...Rfd8 =A0The best thing of this match so far for the chess fans is to=
have
> Anand strike first. This way, Kramnik has to force the issues to even thi=
ngs
> out. If Kramnik would have scored first, he would just play very safe to
> hold. I expect Anand to play Bg4 and not take any chances.
>
> 17.Bg4 =A0Black can safely play 17...Qe5, 17...Qf6, or 17...Qg6 without m=
uch
> difference.
>
> 17...Qe5 This is a possibility 18.Qb3 d4 19.Bxe6 Qxe6 20.Qxe6 fxe6 21.exd=
4
> Rxd4 =3D
>
> 18.Qb3 =A0Unfortunately for the chess fans, basically all lines will most
> likely lead to a peaceful ending.
>
> 18...Nc5 An interesting try but White can simply move out of the way with
> 19.Qb5. Black eventually has to trade the d5 pawn which will lead to a
> symmetrical pawn structure.
>
> 19.Qb5 Black's most logical move is 19...b6 to protect the Knight since i=
t
> is located on a good square. The White can start moving his Rooks to the =
d
> and c files.
>
> 19...b6 20.Rfd1 Rd6 Black obviously will double his Rooks on the d file.
> White can simply chase the Knight away with b4 and if the Knight retreats=
to
> e6, White can simply trade the Bishop and Knight then move the Rook to d4=
to
> block Black's pawn from advancing. White can also play 21.Rd4 immediately=
.
> It really does not matter which order White chooses. =A0Even with all of =
that,
> the position will not yield a decisive result for either side. Perhaps a
> draw will be agreed after move 30.
>
> 21.Rd4 a6 Now White has only one move which is 22.Qb4 to stop the Nb3
> threat.
>
> 22.Qb4 =A0Anand responded with this move instantly. Black has a wide rang=
e of
> possible moves such as 22...h5, 22...f5, or 22...Rad8. They are all
> perfectly playable.
>
> 22...h5 It will be interesting to see if Anand will choose to retreat to =
the
> d1-h5 diagonal with 23.Be2 or 23.Be3 or go the other way with 23.Bh3. The
> ladder one is probably safer to prevent Ne6 to chase the Rook away from t=
he
> nice d4 square.
>
> 23.Bh3 Rad8 =A0Simply a logical move. Sometimes, it is better to follow t=
he
> most logical path and not complicate things for no reason. An interesting
> option for White now is 24.g3 to allow the flexibility for the Bishop to =
go
> back to g2 or even f1. =A0I cannot imagine Kramnik going crazy with the g=
5
> idea because he definitely does not want to take a chance to go down a
> serious 0-2 hole. He is too calm and cool to panic this early with 8 game=
s
> left after this one .
>
> 24.g3
> Chess news from Susan Polgar

And after the further moves 24...g5 25.Rad1 g4 26.Bg2 Ne6 27.R4d3 d4
28.exd4 Rxd4 29.Rxd4 Rxd4, a draw was agreed. Score after 4 games:
Anand 2=BD, Kramknik 1=BD.


  
Date: 18 Oct 2008 15:17:12
From: SAT W-7
Subject: Re: Anand-Kramnik real-time coverage
Thank you Mr Kingston , i appreciate that ...
Maybe you can post again for one or two more of there games ..Preferably
all their games..
I played the game out and i find it exciting , just thinking of how
one blunder at this high of level can cost you the game..

How long have these games been ? I belive one of the games was 4
hours ..



   
Date: 18 Oct 2008 21:43:13
From: EZoto
Subject: Re: Anand-Kramnik real-time coverage
On Sat, 18 Oct 2008 15:17:12 -0700, [email protected] (SAT W-7) wrote:


> I played the game out and i find it exciting , just thinking of how
>one blunder at this high of level can cost you the game..
>
I don't agree totally with that. In a World championship match the
stress level is so high and the pressure intense that the players
usually play at a lower level than they normally do. Some of the
worst blunders ever seen at the highest level of chess usually happens
in the World Championship and one single game can have more mistakes
than they usually do. A perfect example is the match between Kramnik
and Topalov. Game 2 everyone saw the winning move easily except
Topalov and Kramnik.

EZoto


  
Date: 18 Oct 2008 15:07:16
From: Chess One
Subject: Re: Anand-Kramnik real-time coverage

<[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]m...
On Oct 18, 11:28 am, "Chess One" <[email protected] > wrote:
> Quite interesting commentary from those who can't do real-time. Notes are
> are by Susan Polgar. Phil Innes
>
> [Event "2008 World Championship"]
> [Site "Bonn"]
> [Date "2008.10.18"]
> [Round "4"]
> [White "Anand, V"]
> [Black "Kramnik, V"]
> [ECO "D37"]
> [White Elo "2783"]
> [Black Elo "2772"]
>
> 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. Nc3 Be7 5. Bf4 O-O 6. e3 Nbd7 7. a3 c5 8.
> cxd5 Nxd5 9. Nxd5 exd5 10. dxc5 Nxc5 11.Be5 The players cranked out the
> first 11 moves at rapid pace. These are all book moves so far. I believe
> the
> most popular option for Black here is 11...Bf6. There are also many other
> playable moves such as 11...Bf5, 11...Bg4, 11...Be6, or 11... f6. I do not
> expect Black to go all out in this game because of a few reasons: 1. He is
> very experienced and he will not panic after just one loss. 2. One of the
> common strategies in big matches is you want to try to stabilize the
> bleeding after a bad loss. Tomorrow would be an off day and Kramnik can
> then
> prepare to even up the score with the White pieces in game 5.
>
> 11...Bf5 This is not the most common continuation but definitely playable.
> White's most logical response here would be 12.Be2. This position is
> roughly
> even.
>
> 12. Be2 Bf6 White has a number of choices such as 13.0-0, 13.Rc1, or
> 13.Bxf6, which most likely will be Anand's choice. Black is equal in any
> of
> the above lines. I am having a hard time finding a convincing plan for
> White. This opening choice suits Kramnik fine as he will try to grind
> things
> out without much risks. 12...Bf6 is technically a new move here but it
> really just transpose to another line.
>
> 13.Bxf6 Qxf6 If Anand wants a quiet game, 14.Nd4 would be a logical
> choice.
> But if he wants something more lively, he may want to consider 14.0-0
> allowing 14...Qxb2 15 .Qxd5
>
> 14.Nd4 I do not expect much happening in this game. It seems that Anand is
> content with a +1 so far. Even if Kramnik can even up the score by the end
> of the match, I have to believe that Anand is quite confident with his
> rapid chess skill. They have played 45 rapid games against each other and
> Anand has a big edge with +10 =33 -2 . One interesting note, Kramnik has
> never beaten Anand with the Black pieces in classical chess.
>
> 14...Ne6 I expect Anand to capture the Bishop and head to a Bishop versus
> Knight set up. After 0-0, White has nothing to fear and his focus will be
> on
> the isolated d5 pawn. I still believe the position is even.
>
> 15.Nxf5 Qxf5 16.O-O Things move along as expected. Black now can place his
> f Rook on d8 threatening d4 to get rid of that isolated pawn. In the mean
> time, White can always play Bg4 to get rid of the Knight. This is
> certainly
> not an exciting position for either side.
>
> 16...Rfd8 The best thing of this match so far for the chess fans is to
> have
> Anand strike first. This way, Kramnik has to force the issues to even
> things
> out. If Kramnik would have scored first, he would just play very safe to
> hold. I expect Anand to play Bg4 and not take any chances.
>
> 17.Bg4 Black can safely play 17...Qe5, 17...Qf6, or 17...Qg6 without much
> difference.
>
> 17...Qe5 This is a possibility 18.Qb3 d4 19.Bxe6 Qxe6 20.Qxe6 fxe6 21.exd4
> Rxd4 =
>
> 18.Qb3 Unfortunately for the chess fans, basically all lines will most
> likely lead to a peaceful ending.
>
> 18...Nc5 An interesting try but White can simply move out of the way with
> 19.Qb5. Black eventually has to trade the d5 pawn which will lead to a
> symmetrical pawn structure.
>
> 19.Qb5 Black's most logical move is 19...b6 to protect the Knight since it
> is located on a good square. The White can start moving his Rooks to the d
> and c files.
>
> 19...b6 20.Rfd1 Rd6 Black obviously will double his Rooks on the d file.
> White can simply chase the Knight away with b4 and if the Knight retreats
> to
> e6, White can simply trade the Bishop and Knight then move the Rook to d4
> to
> block Black's pawn from advancing. White can also play 21.Rd4 immediately.
> It really does not matter which order White chooses. Even with all of
> that,
> the position will not yield a decisive result for either side. Perhaps a
> draw will be agreed after move 30.
>
> 21.Rd4 a6 Now White has only one move which is 22.Qb4 to stop the Nb3
> threat.
>
> 22.Qb4 Anand responded with this move instantly. Black has a wide range of
> possible moves such as 22...h5, 22...f5, or 22...Rad8. They are all
> perfectly playable.
>
> 22...h5 It will be interesting to see if Anand will choose to retreat to
> the
> d1-h5 diagonal with 23.Be2 or 23.Be3 or go the other way with 23.Bh3. The
> ladder one is probably safer to prevent Ne6 to chase the Rook away from
> the
> nice d4 square.
>
> 23.Bh3 Rad8 Simply a logical move. Sometimes, it is better to follow the
> most logical path and not complicate things for no reason. An interesting
> option for White now is 24.g3 to allow the flexibility for the Bishop to
> go
> back to g2 or even f1. I cannot imagine Kramnik going crazy with the g5
> idea because he definitely does not want to take a chance to go down a
> serious 0-2 hole. He is too calm and cool to panic this early with 8 games
> left after this one .
>
> 24.g3
> Chess news from Susan Polgar

[the same score as per Taylor Kingston & Chesscafe, but with notes]

23.Bh3 Rad8 Simply a logical move. Sometimes, it is better to follow the
most logical path and not complicate things for no reason. An interesting
option for White now is 24.g3 to allow the flexibility for the Bishop to go
back to g2 or even f1. It is risky for Kramnik to go crazy with the g5 - g4
idea because he definitely does not want to take a chance to go down a
serious 0-2 hole. He is too calm and cool to panic this early with 8 games
left after this one .

24.g3 g5 I have to give Kramnik a lot of credit for at least trying to mix
things up. White needs to double up his Rooks to put additional pressure on
Black's d5 pawn.

25.Rad1 g4 26.Bg2 Ne6 White can simply play R4d3 = Black can start pushing
the d pawn now that the Knight is on e6 to reinforce this.

27.R4d3 d4 28.exd4 If Black recaptures with the Knight, White could move his
King to h1. Kramnik is trying to make something happen out of very little.
Black's Knight will be quite active after 28...Nxd4 . The other option is
28...Rxd4 29.Rxd4 Nxd4 30.Kh1.

28...Rxd4 I believe Anand has to take the Rook. 29.Qc3 is too risky.

29.Rxd4 Rxd4 White can play 30.Rxd4 Nxc4 31.Qxb6 Qe1+ 32.Bf1 =

1/2 The players agreed to a draw. As I expected early on, I expected a draw
around move 30 due to the position on the board. Having said that, I think
this is a good game for Kramnik psychologically. He held easily with Black
and even tried to make something happen which forced Anand to think and to
be very careful. He could have tried to push on for a few more moves but it
would lead to the same result.

Tomorrow is a day off and it is time for Kramnik and his team to get back to
the drawing board and come up with something for game 5 with White.
Chess news from Susan Polgar


And after the further moves 24...g5 25.Rad1 g4 26.Bg2 Ne6 27.R4d3 d4
28.exd4 Rxd4 29.Rxd4 Rxd4, a draw was agreed. Score after 4 games:
Anand 2, Kramknik 1.




 
Date: 18 Oct 2008 07:29:45
From: SAT W-7
Subject: Re: Anand-Kramnik real-time coverage
My webtv sucks , i wish i could watch it live , this is why i belive
they should have Pay Per View so people can watch the games live on tv
for a reasonable price .....

Since Anand just won as black and now he is white today i think id press
hard for a win ..If he can win today the match is pretty much over since
they only play I2 games ..They need to go back to 24 games so two loses
does not knock you out......



  
Date: 18 Oct 2008 11:28:40
From: Chess One
Subject: Re: Anand-Kramnik real-time coverage
Quite interesting commentary from those who can't do real-time. Notes are
are by Susan Polgar. Phil Innes

[Event "2008 World Championship"]
[Site "Bonn"]
[Date "2008.10.18"]
[Round "4"]
[White "Anand, V"]
[Black "Kramnik, V"]
[ECO "D37"]
[White Elo "2783"]
[Black Elo "2772"]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 d5 4. Nc3 Be7 5. Bf4 O-O 6. e3 Nbd7 7. a3 c5 8.
cxd5 Nxd5 9. Nxd5 exd5 10. dxc5 Nxc5 11.Be5 The players cranked out the
first 11 moves at rapid pace. These are all book moves so far. I believe the
most popular option for Black here is 11...Bf6. There are also many other
playable moves such as 11...Bf5, 11...Bg4, 11...Be6, or 11... f6. I do not
expect Black to go all out in this game because of a few reasons: 1. He is
very experienced and he will not panic after just one loss. 2. One of the
common strategies in big matches is you want to try to stabilize the
bleeding after a bad loss. Tomorrow would be an off day and Kramnik can then
prepare to even up the score with the White pieces in game 5.

11...Bf5 This is not the most common continuation but definitely playable.
White's most logical response here would be 12.Be2. This position is roughly
even.

12. Be2 Bf6 White has a number of choices such as 13.0-0, 13.Rc1, or
13.Bxf6, which most likely will be Anand's choice. Black is equal in any of
the above lines. I am having a hard time finding a convincing plan for
White. This opening choice suits Kramnik fine as he will try to grind things
out without much risks. 12...Bf6 is technically a new move here but it
really just transpose to another line.

13.Bxf6 Qxf6 If Anand wants a quiet game, 14.Nd4 would be a logical choice.
But if he wants something more lively, he may want to consider 14.0-0
allowing 14...Qxb2 15 .Qxd5

14.Nd4 I do not expect much happening in this game. It seems that Anand is
content with a +1 so far. Even if Kramnik can even up the score by the end
of the match, I have to believe that Anand is quite confident with his
rapid chess skill. They have played 45 rapid games against each other and
Anand has a big edge with +10 =33 -2 . One interesting note, Kramnik has
never beaten Anand with the Black pieces in classical chess.

14...Ne6 I expect Anand to capture the Bishop and head to a Bishop versus
Knight set up. After 0-0, White has nothing to fear and his focus will be on
the isolated d5 pawn. I still believe the position is even.

15.Nxf5 Qxf5 16.O-O Things move along as expected. Black now can place his
f Rook on d8 threatening d4 to get rid of that isolated pawn. In the mean
time, White can always play Bg4 to get rid of the Knight. This is certainly
not an exciting position for either side.

16...Rfd8 The best thing of this match so far for the chess fans is to have
Anand strike first. This way, Kramnik has to force the issues to even things
out. If Kramnik would have scored first, he would just play very safe to
hold. I expect Anand to play Bg4 and not take any chances.

17.Bg4 Black can safely play 17...Qe5, 17...Qf6, or 17...Qg6 without much
difference.

17...Qe5 This is a possibility 18.Qb3 d4 19.Bxe6 Qxe6 20.Qxe6 fxe6 21.exd4
Rxd4 =

18.Qb3 Unfortunately for the chess fans, basically all lines will most
likely lead to a peaceful ending.

18...Nc5 An interesting try but White can simply move out of the way with
19.Qb5. Black eventually has to trade the d5 pawn which will lead to a
symmetrical pawn structure.

19.Qb5 Black's most logical move is 19...b6 to protect the Knight since it
is located on a good square. The White can start moving his Rooks to the d
and c files.

19...b6 20.Rfd1 Rd6 Black obviously will double his Rooks on the d file.
White can simply chase the Knight away with b4 and if the Knight retreats to
e6, White can simply trade the Bishop and Knight then move the Rook to d4 to
block Black's pawn from advancing. White can also play 21.Rd4 immediately.
It really does not matter which order White chooses. Even with all of that,
the position will not yield a decisive result for either side. Perhaps a
draw will be agreed after move 30.

21.Rd4 a6 Now White has only one move which is 22.Qb4 to stop the Nb3
threat.

22.Qb4 Anand responded with this move instantly. Black has a wide range of
possible moves such as 22...h5, 22...f5, or 22...Rad8. They are all
perfectly playable.

22...h5 It will be interesting to see if Anand will choose to retreat to the
d1-h5 diagonal with 23.Be2 or 23.Be3 or go the other way with 23.Bh3. The
ladder one is probably safer to prevent Ne6 to chase the Rook away from the
nice d4 square.

23.Bh3 Rad8 Simply a logical move. Sometimes, it is better to follow the
most logical path and not complicate things for no reason. An interesting
option for White now is 24.g3 to allow the flexibility for the Bishop to go
back to g2 or even f1. I cannot imagine Kramnik going crazy with the g5
idea because he definitely does not want to take a chance to go down a
serious 0-2 hole. He is too calm and cool to panic this early with 8 games
left after this one .

24.g3
Chess news from Susan Polgar