Main
Date: 14 Oct 2008 19:13:41
From: M Winther
Subject: Chess opening cards
Chess openings cards, such as used by the checkers community (so
called ballot cards), could be an idea to introduce into chess:
http://www.cnchess.com/en/chess_open_card.html

Mats




 
Date: 14 Oct 2008 11:37:22
From: Quadibloc
Subject: Re: Chess opening cards
On Oct 14, 11:13=A0am, "M Winther" <[email protected] > wrote:
> Chess openings cards, such as used by the checkers community (so
> called ballot cards), could be an idea to introduce into chess:

The link, of course, shows cards for another purpose. I could be
wrong, but my perception is that guided opening moves are detested by
many Checkers players - but in that game, the necessity for the
innovation is accepted, if grudgingly. In Chess, the idea simply would
be rejected outright by too large a group of players.

As I've noted, this is why I thought that if some people find Chess960
too "messy", why not choose a chess variant at random - by using a
fixed board, and a fixed pool of pieces from which a set would be
chosen to produce a symmetrical array.

The idea was not to find a panacea, but to provide a 'randomized
chess' which is perhaps more palatable than a scrambled array or
prescribed moves.

John Savard


  
Date: 16 Oct 2008 01:34:53
From: Quadibloc
Subject: Re: Chess opening cards
On Oct 14, 9:43 pm, "M Winther" <[email protected] > wrote:

> We cannot randomize between chessvariants because it is very confusing,
> and we would see many horrid and amateurish games. Chessplayers want
> to develop their competence and feel that they are in command of the
> game, otherwise it isn't fun.

Well, in order to have a large number of chess variants to choose
from, they were systematically related. So it wasn't as if one was
picking, at random, an entry from a book on chess variants. Instead,
one was merely randomly selecting which pieces to use from a constant
pool of pieces.

But somewhat more amateurish play seems to be exactly what is wanted.
Steinitz brought in such a high degree of professionalism to chess
play that we get many draws and few exciting games like Anderssen-
Kieseritzky.

John Savard


  
Date: 15 Oct 2008 00:00:47
From: [email protected]
Subject: Re: Chess opening cards
THIS CRAZY WORLD OF CHESS by GM Larry Evans (page 41)

Kasparov On Fischer Random Chess

=93From my viewpoint, Fischer Random is entirely acceptable.
But instead of 960 possible positions, most of which are poison
to your eyes, downsize the number to 20 or 30. Simply pick one
and play it for a year. Next year a different one. It goes without
saying that a year later this whole theory that has developed
will be of no use to anyone: move a single piece and the entire
position changes radically. But at the same time, to entirely
exclude opening preparation is unimaginable. In that case chess
will turn into a very strange spectacle.=94


M Winther wrote:
> Den 2008-10-14 20:37:22 skrev Quadibloc <[email protected]>:
>
> > On Oct 14, 11:13?am, "M Winther" <[email protected]> wrote:
> >> Chess openings cards, such as used by the checkers community (so
> >> called ballot cards), could be an idea to introduce into chess:
> >
> > The link, of course, shows cards for another purpose. I could be
> > wrong, but my perception is that guided opening moves are detested by
> > many Checkers players - but in that game, the necessity for the
> > innovation is accepted, if grudgingly. In Chess, the idea simply would
> > be rejected outright by too large a group of players.
> >
> > As I've noted, this is why I thought that if some people find Chess960
> > too "messy", why not choose a chess variant at random - by using a
> > fixed board, and a fixed pool of pieces from which a set would be
> > chosen to produce a symmetrical array.
> >
> > The idea was not to find a panacea, but to provide a 'randomized
> > chess' which is perhaps more palatable than a scrambled array or
> > prescribed moves.
> >
> > John Savard
> >
>
> We cannot randomize between chessvariants because it is very confusing,
> and we would see many horrid and amateurish games. Chessplayers want
> to develop their competence and feel that they are in command of the
> game, otherwise it isn't fun.
>
> Mats


  
Date: 15 Oct 2008 05:43:22
From: M Winther
Subject: Re: Chess opening cards
Den 2008-10-14 20:37:22 skrev Quadibloc <[email protected] >:

> On Oct 14, 11:13 am, "M Winther" <[email protected]> wrote:
>> Chess openings cards, such as used by the checkers community (so
>> called ballot cards), could be an idea to introduce into chess:
>
> The link, of course, shows cards for another purpose. I could be
> wrong, but my perception is that guided opening moves are detested by
> many Checkers players - but in that game, the necessity for the
> innovation is accepted, if grudgingly. In Chess, the idea simply would
> be rejected outright by too large a group of players.
>
> As I've noted, this is why I thought that if some people find Chess960
> too "messy", why not choose a chess variant at random - by using a
> fixed board, and a fixed pool of pieces from which a set would be
> chosen to produce a symmetrical array.
>
> The idea was not to find a panacea, but to provide a 'randomized
> chess' which is perhaps more palatable than a scrambled array or
> prescribed moves.
>
> John Savard
>

We cannot randomize between chessvariants because it is very confusing,
and we would see many horrid and amateurish games. Chessplayers want
to develop their competence and feel that they are in command of the
game, otherwise it isn't fun.

Mats