Main
Date: 21 Dec 2007 00:09:05
From: [email protected]
Subject: Weighting pieces
Is there a recommended material and/or method of weighting chess
pieces yourself? I'd like a weighted set, but I already have an
unweighted one, and got to thinking that, maybe, someone had come up
with a good do-it-yourself way (maybe someone who didn't want to pay
all that extra shipping cost for a weighted set). Thanks for your
time - and any answers. (You really have to love the Internet for the
fact that looking for such information is so easy!)

[email protected]

"Love is that condition in which the happiness of another person=20
is essential to your own."
--Robert A. Heinlein




 
Date: 21 Dec 2007 14:44:44
From: David Richerby
Subject: Re: Weighting pieces
[email protected] <[email protected] > wrote:
> Is there a recommended material and/or method of weighting chess
> pieces yourself?

Lead shot and epoxy. But, given the hassle of weighting an unweighted
set, you'd almost certainly be better off just buying a new set.


Dave.

--
David Richerby Mouldy Moistened Windows (TM):
www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~davidr/ it's like a graphical user interface
but it's moist and starting to grow
mushrooms!


  
Date: 23 Dec 2007 12:33:14
From: Guy Macon
Subject: Re: Weighting pieces



help bot wrote:
>
>Guy Macon <http://www.guymacon.com/> wrote:

>> From the Material Safety Data Sheet for Lead:
>> "Lead metal foil, shot or sheets: Not an ingestion hazard."

> C'mon now: do you really believe all that lead shot
>will simply pass through one's system /intact/?
>What about the acids in the stomach-- have they no
>affect on lead?

I have never seen or heard of a single example of a MSDS
that calls something safe when it isn't.

Thinks about all the shotgun pellets, wheel weights, fishing
sinkers, elecric meter seals, stained glass windoews, etc.
Ever hear of any of them hurting anyone? Now think about
the cases wher lead does hurt someone -- paoint chips, toys,
etc. The lead that doesn't hurt anyone is elemental lead.
The lead that hurts poeple is various lead compounds.


--
Guy Macon
<http://www.guymacon.com/ >



  
Date: 22 Dec 2007 16:52:31
From: help bot
Subject: Re: Weighting pieces
On Dec 22, 7:30 am, Guy Macon <http://www.guymacon.com/ > wrote:
> help bot wrote:
> >But as we know, lead has its own
> >dangers; if ingested, lead is *toxic*, unlike so
> >many of the alternatives.
> >Oh-- and don't let
> >the kids near your /poisonous/ lead-shot. (If
> >ingested, induce vomiting by forcing a jalapeno
> >pepper and 1/2 tablespoon of gunpowder down
> >the throat, then call the undertaker.) I believe
> >the real antidote to lead-poisoning is UGTH,
> >which sucks metals and calcium out of the
> >blood vessels, or something like that.
>
> From the Material Safety Data Sheet for Lead:
> "Lead metal foil, shot or sheets: Not an ingestion hazard."
> "Ingestion: Do NOT induce vomiting"http://www.sciencelab.com/xMSDS-Lead-9927204
>
> My comments: Solid lead is really quite safe. Inhaled as fine
> powder, made into a lead salt or organic compound containing
> lead (such as lead tetraethyl -- what they put in gasoline) or
> exposed in small quantities for long periods (water from lead
> pipes) it is very nasty, but you can eat lead shot without any
> problem from toxicity.

Interesting. So then, I could theoretically swallow
ten pounds of lead shot, then bet that I could "lose
ten pounds in under a week", earning a quick fifty
cents for lunch money.

C'mon now: do you really believe all that lead shot
will simply pass through one's system /intact/?
What about the acids in the stomach-- have they no
affect on lead? And what about the epoxy? Is it, too,
completely harmless if ingested (presumably by a
child)? Weird science... . In any case, I now know
I'm gonna have to stop inhaling the stuff. The truth is,
even back when regular gasoline was leaded, I filled
my tank, but I didn't inhale.


-- help bot




   
Date: 24 Dec 2007 10:13:05
From: David Richerby
Subject: Re: Weighting pieces
help bot <[email protected] > wrote:
> Interesting. So then, I could theoretically swallow ten pounds of
> lead shot, then bet that I could "lose ten pounds in under a week",
> earning a quick fifty cents for lunch money.

Nobody ever said it was safe to eat 10lb of lead. That would almost
certainly cause problems just from its physical weight -- your body
would have difficulty moving it around.

> C'mon now: do you really believe all that lead shot
> will simply pass through one's system /intact/?

Pretty much, yes. Remember that the purpose of lead shot is to shoot
things which one is then likely to eat. It's impossible to get the
shot out of the bird before eating it so some of it is going to get
swallowed by accident.

> What about the acids in the stomach-- have they no affect on lead?

Almost none. Lead is very resistant to corrosion, which is why it's
used for church rooves. Of course, minute quantities will dissolve
but the amount of lead that will enter your system after swallowing a
couple of pellets of lead shot will, I'm sure, be negligible compared
to the amount of lead you've inhaled over the years from vehicle
exhausts.

> And what about the epoxy? Is it, too, completely harmless if
> ingested (presumably by a child)?

I believe so, yes. It's very unreactive.

> Weird science...

Not at all.


Dave.

--
David Richerby Evil Psychotic Dictator (TM): it's
www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~davidr/ like a totalitarian leader but it
wants to kill you and it's genuinely
evil!


   
Date: 22 Dec 2007 18:25:18
From: SAT W-7
Subject: Re: Weighting pieces
I buy leaded gas for my I968 Dodge Charger 440 Magnum ....I do not have
hardened valve guides so it needs a little lead + it is II4 octane
gas.....I can not pull my car up to the pump i have to get it in gas
cans....
Makes my 440 cubic inch engine run well and cool ...The unleaded gas
makes it run warmer.



  
Date: 22 Dec 2007 12:30:37
From: Guy Macon
Subject: Re: Weighting pieces



help bot wrote:

>But as we know, lead has its own
>dangers; if ingested, lead is *toxic*, unlike so
>many of the alternatives.

>Oh-- and don't let
>the kids near your /poisonous/ lead-shot. (If
>ingested, induce vomiting by forcing a jalapeno
>pepper and 1/2 tablespoon of gunpowder down
>the throat, then call the undertaker.) I believe
>the real antidote to lead-poisoning is UGTH,
>which sucks metals and calcium out of the
>blood vessels, or something like that.

From the Material Safety Data Sheet for Lead:
"Lead metal foil, shot or sheets: Not an ingestion hazard."
"Ingestion: Do NOT induce vomiting"
http://www.sciencelab.com/xMSDS-Lead-9927204

My comments: Solid lead is really quite safe. Inhaled as fine
powder, made into a lead salt or organic compound containing
lead (such as lead tetraethyl -- what they put in gasoline) or
exposed in small quantities for long periods (water from lead
pipes) it is very nasty, but you can eat lead shot without any
problem from toxicity.

--
Guy Macon
<http://www.guymacon.com/ >



   
Date: 22 Dec 2007 10:46:08
From: Chess One
Subject: Re: Weighting pieces

"Guy Macon" <http://www.guymacon.com/ > wrote in message
news:[email protected]

> My comments: Solid lead is really quite safe. Inhaled as fine
> powder, made into a lead salt or organic compound containing
> lead (such as lead tetraethyl -- what they put in gasoline) or
> exposed in small quantities for long periods (water from lead
> pipes) it is very nasty, but you can eat lead shot without any
> problem from toxicity.

If you wanted to fit weights to an ordinary wood set - how about a couple or
three washers, glued into the bottom recess, using one of those core-drill
bits for drill or dremel of the right diameter - finish the bottom in
China-t felt as bot suggests?

I suppose alternate is to drill hole 1/2 way up piece, and put in metal
plug/slug, finish same way. Probably can't use brass screws into bottom of
piece because of danger of splitting?

Dunno - anyone [laugh] ever tried to do it?

Phil

> --
> Guy Macon
> <http://www.guymacon.com/>
>




    
Date: 22 Dec 2007 15:08:22
From: SAT W-7
Subject: Re: Weighting pieces
What is the name of the triple weighted chess sets that are out there ?

I saw a wooden chess set and the King was 5 inches tall and i picked
it up only to be disappointed in the weight ..It was light ..This has
been awhile ago now and i can not remember the wood it was made out of
.

I have a Oak tree and and about every other year i have pros come out
and trim them , would a oak chess set be cool to have ? I would have to
find a wood craftsmen to do it because i could not do it ......



     
Date: 23 Dec 2007 08:09:03
From: Chess One
Subject: Re: Weighting pieces

"SAT W-7" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> What is the name of the triple weighted chess sets that are out there ?

Dunno - but I think House of Staunton has a bunch on their site, also the
Jacques set...

http://www.houseofstaunton.com/index.shtml

I don't see any extra weighted set there, but it does give height, base
diameter for each set: eg, Petersburg, [King] 3.6", base 1.6" and total set
weight [4 Queen set] of 45 ounces - and this fits recommended board size of
2" squares

looking at another set 'New York' it has 4" king, 1.875" dia. base and set
weight 61 ounces, board size 2.375 to 2.5 sq [34 pieces]

I wonder what the king weight should be in relationshipo to its height?
Also, what the general parameters are for all the pieces based on King
height/weight? I tried a few googles and didn't that info

> I saw a wooden chess set and the King was 5 inches tall and i picked
> it up only to be disappointed in the weight ..It was light ..This has
> been awhile ago now and i can not remember the wood it was made out of

I have a Russian 'Grandmaster Set' [actually used by 6 world champions!] and
the pieces are unwieghted, unfelted. I am too nervous to retrofit it :)

> I have a Oak tree and and about every other year i have pros come out
> and trim them , would a oak chess set be cool to have ? I would have to
> find a wood craftsmen to do it because i could not do it ......

Woods needs seasoning, otherwise will split. Assume this is not red-Oak? The
HoS sets above are priced approx $500-$1000. If you want a /really/ valuable
set, don't turn it, hand-carve it - use hand-chisels, dremel, fine fret-saw
and rasps [that's English name, is American name the same?]. Perhaps someone
more knowlegable can tell you about staining white-Oak for durability, and
if you can apply a finish on top of the stain, other than plastics like
eurethanes.

---
One of the most famous - and very good looking - home made sets was by
cel Duchamp [google picture] , who made at least one set out of a broom
handle.

Cordially and good luck! Phil





   
Date: 22 Dec 2007 04:45:57
From: Mike Murray
Subject: Re: Weighting pieces
On Sat, 22 Dec 2007 12:30:37 +0000, Guy Macon
<http://www.guymacon.com/ > wrote:


>My comments: Solid lead is really quite safe. Inhaled as fine
>powder, made into a lead salt or organic compound containing
>lead (such as lead tetraethyl -- what they put in gasoline) or
>exposed in small quantities for long periods (water from lead
>pipes) it is very nasty, but you can eat lead shot without any
>problem from toxicity.

Easy to crack a tooth though, if you missed some in the duck.


    
Date: 22 Dec 2007 12:56:06
From: Guy Macon
Subject: Re: Weighting pieces



Mike Murray wrote:
>
>Guy Macon <http://www.guymacon.com/> wrote:
>
>>My comments: Solid lead is really quite safe. Inhaled as fine
>>powder, made into a lead salt or organic compound containing
>>lead (such as lead tetraethyl -- what they put in gasoline) or
>>exposed in small quantities for long periods (water from lead
>>pipes) it is very nasty, but you can eat lead shot without any
>>problem from toxicity.
>
>Easy to crack a tooth though, if you missed some in the duck.

I went duck hunting with a machine gun once. I only got one
duck, but I got him 487 times...

--
Guy Macon
<http://www.guymacon.com/ >



  
Date: 22 Dec 2007 01:35:23
From: help bot
Subject: Re: Weighting pieces
On Dec 21, 6:55 pm, "[email protected]" <[email protected] > wrote:

> >> Is there a recommended material and/or method of weighting chess
> >> pieces yourself?
>
> >Lead shot and epoxy. But, given the hassle of weighting an unweighted
> >set, you'd almost certainly be better off just buying a new set.

> Yeah, I'd pretty much decided that. But, once the question occurred
> to me, it became an exercise - a puzzle to be solved. I was curious
> about how one would go about it, especially materials. (I suspect
> that modeling cement might harm the plastic, for instance.) Thanks
> for posting an answer, instead of a diatribe.


Just a week or two ago, this whole issue was
covered here in more detail, and at least one
answer recommended lead shot. Personally,
I find the idea of a "heavy metal" washer flying
at my face during a game of blitz to be rather
upsetting. But as we know, lead has its own
dangers; if ingested, lead is *toxic*, unlike so
many of the alternatives.

The idea is that shot can fill in the tiny spaces
way up inside a plastic chess piece, unlike a
metal washer, so you have the option of
over-weighting the chess men. But in reality,
it is always the bottom of the man which must
face down, so why not put the weight /there/,
as on a ship?

Remember, goobers: Wal-t sells round
pre-cut felt. So when you are done playing with
your cheap, weightless plastic sets, your next
step is *not* to go for the scissors and a
rectangular section of felt. Oh-- and don't let
the kids near your /poisonous/ lead-shot. (If
ingested, induce vomiting by forcing a jalapeno
pepper and 1/2 tablespoon of gunpowder down
the throat, then call the undertaker.) I believe
the real antidote to lead-poisoning is UGTH,
which sucks metals and calcium out of the
blood vessels, or something like that.


-- help bot





  
Date: 21 Dec 2007 17:55:34
From: [email protected]
Subject: Re: Weighting pieces
On 21 Dec 2007 14:44:44 +0000 (GMT), David Richerby
<[email protected] > wrote:

>[email protected] <[email protected]> wrote:
>> Is there a recommended material and/or method of weighting chess
>> pieces yourself?
>
>Lead shot and epoxy. But, given the hassle of weighting an unweighted
>set, you'd almost certainly be better off just buying a new set.
>
>
>Dave.

Yeah, I'd pretty much decided that. But, once the question occurred
to me, it became an exercise - a puzzle to be solved. I was curious
about how one would go about it, especially materials. (I suspect
that modeling cement might harm the plastic, for instance.) Thanks
for posting an answer, instead of a diatribe.


[email protected]

"Love is that condition in which the happiness of another person=20
is essential to your own."
--Robert A. Heinlein


 
Date: 20 Dec 2007 22:58:15
From: help bot
Subject: Re: Weighting pieces
On Dec 21, 1:09 am, "[email protected]" <[email protected] > wrote:

> Is there a recommended material and/or method of weighting chess
> pieces yourself? I'd like a weighted set, but I already have an
> unweighted one, and got to thinking that, maybe, someone had come up
> with a good do-it-yourself way (maybe someone who didn't want to pay
> all that extra shipping cost for a weighted set). Thanks for your
> time - and any answers. (You really have to love the Internet for the
> fact that looking for such information is so easy!)

It's hard to believe so many people want to spend
the time and effort to insert weights into unweighted
chess pieces.

First of all, *good* sets come weighted already.
And secondly, if it's a wooden set with no weights,
you may have to drill 32 holes just to make room
for the weights, and that doesn't even consider
the (presumably) felt coverings.

I once knew a fellow who used /scissors/ to cut
out 32 round pieces of felt, of various sizes, just
to put on the bottoms of a wooden set (which for
reasons unknown to me, had junk paper "felt"
bottoms.

I recently ordered a /plastic/ set which was
triple-weighted at the factory; I can't even begin
to imagine buying an unweighted set like that,
only to turn around and later decide I now want
heavier weights put in. That's like buying a
house with vinyl siding, then changing your mind
and rebuilding the thing with brick; what a waste.

It's like those silly kids who buy junky old Chevy
Cavaliers, then spent countless hours and dollars
spiffying them up to try and look like real sports
cars; in the end, they have just wasted their time
and money, and their cars are still junk.

Now, if I had an expensive wooden set and the
weights were falling out, I might get some epoxy
or something and put 'em back in. Okay, as a
help bot I feel obligated to inform those losers
who want to waste their time rebuilding cheap
sets with no weights, that Wal-t sells sets of
pre-cut felt, just right for certain chess pieces.
So put away your scissors; carefully. Don't
run.


-- help bot